Golden Globes mess gets even messier

The Hollywood Foreign Press Association announced on Friday that NBC would no longer have the exclusive rights to broadcast Sunday’s Golden Globes press conference and that the event would be open to all media. This latest change of plans will be a boon to cable nets like E!, CNN, and TV Guide Channel, which can now air the press conference live. The Writers Guild of America, which some suspected would still picket the press conference, announced that it will not protest the event now.

The Globes ceremony was scrapped earlier this week when the Screen Actors Guild vowed to boycott the show because the Writers Guild of America planned to picket the event. After NBC decided to turn the event into an NBC News sponsored press conference, Dick Clark Productions, which was contracted to produce the event for NBC on behalf of the HFPA, backed out. NBC News had planned to air the one-hour press conference, with hosting help from Access Hollywood anchors Billy Bush and Nancy O’Dell, following a two-hour Dateline special.

But the HFPA, according to one insider familiar with the talks, had growing concerns over how the event was turning into a promotional ploy for NBC’s Access Hollywood. Dick Clark Prods. wasn’t happy either. According to this insider, NBC’s 11th-hour decision to turn the Globes into a press conference was irksome to Dick Clark Prods. because the production company had been led to believe that the network would bow out of the telecast completely.

Instead, NBC continued to say the show would go on, which forced
Dick Clark Prods. to incur more costs for a televised ceremony that was
ultimately not to be. The insider says Dick Clark Prods. was not only
trying to recoup money it lost in pre-production of the ceremony, but
it was upset about the two-hour Dateline special that is set to
precede the Globe press conference. “NBC wanted to have an exclusive,
three-hour broadcast disguised as a news conference,” Dick Clark Prods.
declared in a statement. “The HFPA and Dick Clark Prods. felt this
arrangement was unfair.” That’s when the production company stepped
back in and requested a million dollar-plus licensing fee — what its
spokesman deemed “a nominal license fee” — even though it was no longer
producing the event. NBC declined. So Dick Clark Prods. and the HFPA
decided to open the Globes press conference to all media.

It’s unclear if this will all get heated enough to lead to some sort
of legal action. One NBC source hints the network “will pursue all
available legal options” for losses in excess of $10 million because
Dick Clark Prods. and the HFPA withdrew the network’s exclusivity. NBC
pays well north of $4 million to air the annual Globes each year.

In the meantime, the HFPA has called on entertainment show anchors such as Showbiz Tonight’s Brooke Anderson, Extra’s Dayna Devon, ET’s Mary Hart, Inside Edition’s Jim Moret, E!’s Giuliana Rancic, and The Insider’s
Lara Spencer to help HFPA President Jorge Camara announce this year’s
recipients. Remarkably, NBC will stick with its plans to have Bush and
O’Dell host a special telecast, taped in a different location than the
Beverly Hilton, where the press conference will be held.

Instead, NBC continued to say the show would go on, which forcedDick Clark Prods. to incur more costs for a televised ceremony that wasultimately not to be. The insider says Dick Clark Prods. was not onlytrying to recoup money it lost in pre-production of the ceremony, butit was upset about the two-hour Dateline special that is set toprecede the Globe press conference. "NBC wanted to have an exclusive,three-hour broadcast disguised as a news conference," Dick Clark Prods.declared in a statement. "The HFPA and Dick Clark Prods. felt thisarrangement was unfair." That’s when the production company steppedback in and requested a million dollar-plus licensing fee — what itsspokesman deemed "a nominal license fee" — even though it was no longerproducing the event. NBC declined. So Dick Clark Prods. and the HFPAdecided to open the Globes press conference to all media.

It’s unclear if this will all get heated enough to lead to some sortof legal action. One NBC source hints the network "will pursue allavailable legal options" for losses in excess of $10 million becauseDick Clark Prods. and the HFPA withdrew the network’s exclusivity. NBCpays well north of $4 million to air the annual Globes each year.

In the meantime, the HFPA has called on entertainment show anchors such as Showbiz Tonight’s Brooke Anderson, Extra’s Dayna Devon, ET’s Mary Hart, Inside Edition’s Jim Moret, E!’s Giuliana Rancic, and The Insider’sLara Spencer to help HFPA President Jorge Camara announce this year’srecipients. Remarkably, NBC will stick with its plans to have Bush andO’Dell host a special telecast, taped in a different location than theBeverly Hilton, where the press conference will be held.

Comments (23 total) Add your comment
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  • Anonymous

    looks like strike is finally working and making costly fighting between producers and networks

  • KG

    ok writers, you’ve shown how powerful you are in hollywood. now can we have our awards shows and scripted shows back on tv? the reading a book thing is not working out for me.

  • anthony

    This WGA strike is the most irritating thing in recent memory. Greed in hollywood leads to this…and also leads to my not being able to enjoy normal, non-reality tv.
    just kiss and make up already, for everyone’s sake.

  • Michigan Man

    Too cool… a grand example of how much money the producers are seeing, and how selfish and avaricious they are!!! Woo to the chaos! I hope they all lose their shirts.

  • JohnT

    To the studios and production companies: Do not roll over for the WGA. In particular, do not allow them into reality TV. The last thing you need is 3 or 4 WGA writers hanging around the food service tables at various production sites all day, contributing nothing. Don’t you have enough of that crew ballooning already with some of the other unions?

  • John

    All the writers want is a fair shake, which they are not getting. Producers and studios are making millions of their work through the internet and other avenues. The writers aren’t paid for this at all. Lets all support these writers.

  • Jon

    This is all so stupid. I was on the writers’ side at first, but now I think both sides are at fault. It’s a bunch of big headed famous people who have more than an average person could ever dream of having. They need to get their act together and compromise on something. They’re acting like taking all of this away from the public is hurting everyone, but it’s not like it’s a doctors’ strike or something. I want them to know that society can continue and function normally without their industry presence. I love my shows, but I’m getting to the point where I don’t even want to support any of them by watching anything.

  • jackjone

    great!

  • Declan

    The writers have to hit where they will have the most impact. This strike is making painfully clear just how much everyone benefits from writers, but nobody wants to pay them. Keep it going guys!

  • donner

    I’m still rootin’ for the writers…they are taken advantage of by the corporate suits and not compensated for it, while the suits gain millions off their work…wouldn’t you want to be compensated if you were working while your bosses raked in the sweet moolah? the fault is with the producers who won’t even come back to the table to discuss the issues any longer…Netflix is full of decent movies/tv shows – watch something worthwhile and not stupid reality shows…

  • Jon

    Society can function without TV shows? What utopia is this? must. have. brain acid.

  • Mulrey

    KG-your comment about reading not working out for you gave me the biggest laugh in along time. Thanks.

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