Writers won't picket NAACP Image Awards on Fox

The Writers Guild of America announced on Tuesday that it has granted an interim agreement that will allow the 39th Annual NAACP Image Awards to air live on Fox Feb. 14. The pact permits the Image Awards to hire scribes to write the show’s script, and it also means that no picketing will occur outside the Shrine Auditorium, where the ceremony will be held. This is a reversal of sorts from the decision the WGA made regarding Dick Clark Productions and the Golden Globes: DCP, which usually produces the Golden Globes for NBC, had requested a similar agreement from the WGA, so that the Globes could have aired without the fear of picket
lines, but the union denied its request.

“The Guild examines each request like this individually and no
decision is easy,” WGA West president Patric Verrone said in a
statement. “Our ultimate goal is to resolve this strike by achieving a
good contract. Because of the historic role the NAACP has played in
struggles like ours, we think this decision is appropriate to jointly
achieve our goals.”

In response, a spokesman for the Alliance of Motion Picture and
Television Producers released this statement: “The Writers Guild is
picking and choosing which awards shows will be able to go on
uninterrupted and which shows it will picket and disrupt. The Guild’s
disruption of the awards shows does a lot to hurt the creative
community in entertainment and audiences everywhere, but it does
nothing to get us closer to a negotiated settlement of this dispute.”

This is the third awards show that the WGA has allowed to go on the
air without the threat of picket lines. The union granted waivers to
the Broadcast Critics Awards, which aired earlier this month on VH1,
and the upcoming SAG Awards, which will air Jan. 27 on TBS and TNT.
Already, the People’s Choice Awards and the Globes were forced to alter
their planned shows because of the threat of WGA picketing.

It’s still unclear how the ongoing strike will affect the Oscars or,
more immediately, the Grammys on Feb. 10, though the WGA has indicated
that it will deny the music awards a waiver
to hire writers to help script that show. There’s also fear the
WGA and SAG will discourage musicians from attending the kudocast, but
so far the WGA hasn’t said whether it will picket the Grammys.

"The Guild examines each request like this individually and nodecision is easy," WGA West president Patric Verrone said in astatement. "Our ultimate goal is to resolve this strike by achieving agood contract. Because of the historic role the NAACP has played instruggles like ours, we think this decision is appropriate to jointlyachieve our goals."

In response, a spokesman for the Alliance of Motion Picture andTelevision Producers released this statement: "The Writers Guild ispicking and choosing which awards shows will be able to go onuninterrupted and which shows it will picket and disrupt. The Guild’sdisruption of the awards shows does a lot to hurt the creativecommunity in entertainment and audiences everywhere, but it doesnothing to get us closer to a negotiated settlement of this dispute."

This is the third awards show that the WGA has allowed to go on theair without the threat of picket lines. The union granted waivers tothe Broadcast Critics Awards, which aired earlier this month on VH1,and the upcoming SAG Awards, which will air Jan. 27 on TBS and TNT.Already, the People’s Choice Awards and the Globes were forced to altertheir planned shows because of the threat of WGA picketing.

It’s still unclear how the ongoing strike will affect the Oscars or,more immediately, the Grammys on Feb. 10, though the WGA has indicatedthat it will deny the music awards a waiver to hire writers to help script that show. There’s also fear theWGA and SAG will discourage musicians from attending the kudocast, butso far the WGA hasn’t said whether it will picket the Grammys.


Comments (22 total) Add your comment
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  • Dan

    Seriously? I’m personally not to convinced in this whole strike if they are letting this show and that show go on, but oh no these two over here we will picket. I mean come on, I understand the NAACP is wonderful and all but I don’t pity these writers at all if they can’t stand strong in their fight.

  • Ceballos

    Ok, first off, I’ve 100% supported the writers’ right to negotiate and earn a fair deal from studios and producers. You can call them greedy if you want, though I think people who call them greedy are probably thinking of the more successful scribes, as opposed to the majority of WGA members who probably don’t make THAT much more than you and me. Still, I don’t think you can really deny them the right to ask for what’s fair.
    All that being said, I think Patric Verrone needs to be a bit more careful when comparing the struggles of people who write for a living with some of the work the NAACP has done.

  • star

    I am all for fairness and the writers. But this is getting ridiculous before they permanently damage how production is handled for all shows from now on. The picking, choosing, and select targeting is ruining their message. And they should think of their message and reach an agreement ASAP before shows learn to go on without them. Look at Leno!

  • jim

    The Writers Union is allowing writers, directors and stars to participate in the TV show for:
    The National Association for Colored People?
    The same Writers Union just refused writers, directors and stars from participating in the Golden Globes, at a cost to the California Economy of $ 120,000,000.00!
    The Union also said that the Grammys and the Oscars would fall to the same strike rules.
    so my question is does the Writers Guild of America (and its members) decide on who to punish base on skin color, creed, or religion?
    If that isn’t racist, please feel free to explain it to me….

  • Trio

    What strike?

  • Horst

    Union? SO – WHO”S WORKIN

  • jim

    To: Trio, Host
    Your indifferent, racist, or undecided?
    Best,
    jim

  • Dawn

    Ok, so now the strike has taken off on a racism gig. Do you think that it may be due to the fact that a good portion of viewers just DO NOT CARE…Those of us that do not care are finding other ways to spend our time with family and friends. Those of us that do not care are actually getting off of our arses an MOVING around…We are finding other areas of entertainment; we are slowly getting back to the way things use to be before depending so heavily on the television. We are finding alternative ways to spend our cash besides blowing it on over inflated ticket costs for shows and movies. We feel empowered; freeā€¦Thank You Writers Guild of America! =) XOXO

  • JohnT

    Pick and choose, pick and choose. Of course the WGA will roll over for the NAACP. It’s the politically correct thing to do. Also, they’re probably afraid of cranking up a Jesse Jackson shakedown, or an Al Sharpton demonstration against their picket line. This is getting to be all too ridiculous.

  • Cliff

    Yes it is a double standard.
    If they felt so strongly for African Americans and our struggle. Wouldn’t you tell the writers for the 5 African American sitcoms still on the air to go back to work?
    Or is this a case of not wanting NAACP, Jesse Jackson and other African American leaders going after the WGA, who are costing various folks thier jobs with this strike, that they seem to be happy with.

  • J

    Why? So the NAACP can give an award to its sponsored show on GSN “Without Prejudice”?? You know the show with all of the rampant bigotry and racism, a show promoted by the NAACP? Give me a break – “Image” Award?? What a laugh – NAACP. Suggest you spend time fixing YOUR image instead.

  • J

    Obviously the WGA doesn’t want the NAACP to turn on them. What a pair: the WGA “fighting for the rights” of writers making $500K-$2M, and the NAACP “fighting for the rights” to promote racist and bigoted television shows like “Without Prejudice” that they sponsor. They demonstrate what is wrong with America today.

  • NAACPer

    I think the story speaks more to the relationship between Organized Labor and the NAACP that has existed since the NAACP’s birth 99 years ago. And I for one look forward to seeing a show that does more than honor the hottest celebs of the moment.

  • NAACPer

    I think the story speaks more to the relationship between Organized Labor and the NAACP that has existed since the NAACP’s birth 99 years ago. And I for one look forward to seeing a show that does more than honor the hottest celebs of the moment.

  • jim

    NAACPer: both of your Wednesday are soft racist statements, and the Union decision to write for The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and not the other shows is an act of racism. It is what it is.
    everyone in America can now spot racism a mile away and this is real racism. If your comfortable with supporting it, than I would hope you woud reconsider.

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