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'Sons of Anarchy' casts Marilyn Manson in recurring role

Filming of Sons of Anarchy‘s final season got underway May 28. Here’s something to look forward to: Marilyn Manson will recur as Ron Tully, a white supremacist prison shot-caller who Jax uses to expand his power base. He’ll make his debut in the season 7 premiere this fall.

Sons has been such a big part of my life, as well as my father’s,” Manson says in FX’s announcement. “So I was determined to make him proud by being involved in what will probably be remembered as the most amazing piece of television cinema. After all, the very heart of SOA is about that relationship. So, now all I need is a motorcycle.”

UPDATE: The Bridge‘s Annabeth Gish has been cast as the new sheriff.

'The Bachelorette' sneak peek: Boyz II Men's Wanya Morris tolerates Andi's vocals -- EXCLUSIVE

Sometimes you want to hide your eyes when you watch The Bachelorette. Other times, you need to wrap that pillow around your head and cover your ears.

The two-night Bachelorette event that begins Sunday, June 1 apparently will be the latter, as 12 men get the “[group] date of a lifetime” when they have the opportunity to sing with Boyz II Men live in concert. In our exclusive sneak peek below, Boys II Men’s Wanya Morris tells Andi she sucks while practicing “I’ll Make Love to You.” He is not wrong. But they both seem to be having a great time nevertheless. READ FULL STORY

Season Finale Awards: 'Big Bang Theory' EP talks show's serious win

Seven seasons in, The Big Bang Theory has scored its most-watched finale and its first award for being “not funny.” Or so joked exec producer Steve Molaro, who phoned Entertainment Weekly Radio to accept our reader-voted Season Finale Award for Best Serious Moment in a Comedy for the train station scene.

The goal of the finale, as Molaro puts it, was to “chip away at Sheldon and break him down to the point where he just needed to leave to process everything.” The university wouldn’t let him change his field of study. Newly-engaged Leonard wanted to talk about new living arrangements (as did Amy). And the comic book store burned down. Leonard and Penny found an overwhelmed Sheldon at the train station and decided they needed to let him go. With the writers not yet back to work, Molaro won’t say how much the experience will change Sheldon, only that it will affect him.

Watching Penny kiss Sheldon’s cheek goodbye got Molaro choked up. But the half hour also packed enough laughs for readers to vote it Funniest Finale. Molaro shares his favorite joke in the interview below. READ FULL STORY

Season Finale Awards: 'Arrow' stunt team vows to somehow do it even better

When Arrow star Stephen Amell teased the show’s second season finale to EW, he said, “If we can’t win the stunt Emmy for this episode, then the system is broken, for sure. I’m starting a campaign, because it’s movie s— that we do in this finale.” Well, it’s working. The show’s stunt coordination was voted Most Likely to Earn Someone an Emmy in our 5th Annual Season Finale Awards.

Stunt coordinator J.J. Makaro and fight coordinator James Bamford phoned in to Entertainment Weekly Radio to accept the honor and chat about the blowout tunnel battle and the dual showdown between Oliver and Slade. “Both fights actually became more of a practical, on-the-day kind of situation,” Makaro says. “We really, really strongly rehearsed the final fight where we had to figure out where the editing points were gonna be [between past and present], but [the tunnel] was more a logistical planning situation where we just put James in a room and he just sat there and he planned. He sat for hours staring at the tunnel [thinking] where he was gonna put his people, where the camera was gonna move.”

Makaro is quick to point out that his team succeeds because of the respect the show’s other departments have for what they do. He also says he and Bamford are used to hearing the question we asked them: How in the world do you top this?

“We have that question asked of us every episode,” Makaro says. “We’ve got the most incredible writers. They come up with terrific ideas, they use them to fuel our imaginations and leave us open to take that and make it even bigger. So they keep pushing the bar higher and higher and higher for us. And that’s the fun and thrill of doing the show…. ‘Try to top this, try to top this.’ Greg Berlanti, our producer, has a mantra that says, ‘Never leave anything behind.’ Don’t save anything for tomorrow. Give it your best, give it your all, and then figure out tomorrow how to do it better.”

Listen to the interview below (at one point we lose Bamford, who was kind enough to call from Italy). Then watch those epic fight scenes again. READ FULL STORY

Season Finale Awards: 'Once Upon a Time' creators on Regina's misfortune, casting Elsa, and that Hook-Emma hook-up

One of the big winners of EW.com’s fifth annual Season Finale Awards (voted on by readers like you!) was Once Upon a Time, ABC’s fantasy fairy tale which took home five awards* including Best Romantic Cliffhanger, Funniest Moment in a Drama, and Biggest Regret That I Didn’t See It, I Just Heard or Read About It.

To accept the awards, show creators Edward Kitsis and Adam Horowitz called in to Entertainment Weekly Radio on Sirius XM 105, where we quizzed them about all things season finale – including that steamy kiss between Hook and Emma, the misfortune of Regina, and what’s coming next in season four.

On Hook being jealous of Hook (Funniest Moment in a Drama): “I think all of us inside have jealousy and sometimes that even includes ourselves in past lives. For us, we kind of look at Captain Hook as our Han Solo. We say he’s Han Solo with guyliner.”

On the Robin-Regina-Marian triangle (Best Romantic Cliffhanger): “[Lana Parilla, who plays Regina] was like, ‘Oh, I’m really enjoying this, I’m falling in love,’ and we said, ‘Great, enjoy it, because we are going to destroy you.’”

On surprising fan love for Regina: “What’s amazing for us is that this is a woman who started the show trying to kill all the lead characters, and now everyone’s mad at us for ripping away her boyfriend.”

On whether Elsa, whose arrival was teased in the final moment of the finale, is more Frozen or fairy tale (Biggest Regret That I Didn’t See It…): “For us, I think this is Elsa from Frozen. That was kind of the inspiration… Will there be our own elements put to it? Yes. Like all things like we do with Snow White or Peter Pan or Captain Hook, we take our own kind of twist on it but remaining faithful to the actual essence of the character.”

Listen to the interview below: READ FULL STORY

Season Finale Awards: 'Revenge' EP talks winning cliffhanger, most disturbing image

Spoiler alert! That’s something we forgot to say to Revenge EP Sunil Nayar when he phoned in to Entertainment Weekly Radio today to accept his show’s Season Finale Award for Best Non-Romantic Cliffhanger and heard the list of nominees. Lucky for you, the clip below is all about his decision to have David Clarke be alive (and to stab Conrad Grayson), as well as the show’s second win in our fifth annual reader-voted awards, Most Disturbing Image. That, of course, would be Victoria’s “gift” to Emily — Aiden’s dead body sitting and waiting for her in front of the fireplace.

“To the credit of Barry [Sloane], who played the part, and to Ken Fink, who directed [the finale], and just the makeup department, it was so much more wonderfully creepy than I even thought it was gonna be,” Nayar says. “Even on the day we shot it, Barry just sitting there and the mouth kinda vaguely open, and how he managed to just stay committed to the moment while being dead was really remarkable. I love the image, and I thought Emily [VanCamp's] performance just seeing it was so tremendous. Her screams, and Victoria turning — it all turned out almost more wonderful and terrifying than we thought it could have been.”

The Revenge writers returned to work May 27, with David’s return and Emily’s reaction to Aiden’s death (she had Victoria, who’d figured out she’s Amanda Clarke, committed!), and more fun lies ahead. “One of the ideas was to reboot [the show], and one of the ideas was to really just kind of boot it in the ass, and I think we did both things really well,” Nayar says. READ FULL STORY

Season Finale Awards: 'Vampire Diaries' director takes us inside Damon's goodbye and that final shot

The winners of EW.com’s fifth annual reader-voted Season Finale Awards were announced today (see them here), and The Vampire Diaries earned five prizes: Most Rewound Moment, Most Unforgettable Line, and Best Use of Music for Damon’s goodbye to Elena; and Best (Presumed) Death or Exit and Best Final Shot for Damon’s mysterious disappearance with Bonnie.

Episode director Chris Grismer called into Entertainment Weekly Radio to accept Best Final Shot for that fade to white as the Other Side crumbled, and frenemies Damon (Ian Somerhalder) and Bonnie (Kat Graham) held hands to accept their unknown fate. In the end, he took a low-tech approach. “We just sort of over-exposed it, just old-school, and used smoke, and then I just had them grab the cameras and shake them,” he says, with a laugh. “The weird thing about it was the actors couldn’t hear each other because we had fans going and it was just pure chaos. So they kinda had to guess when it was their turn to talk, and then we dubbed their voices afterward.”

Damon’s emotional farewell to Elena (Nina Dobrev) had its own challenges. Somerhalder could look at Dobrev for his close-ups — but since Elena wasn’t supposed to be able to see dead Damon, Dobrev had to spend more time acting without Somerhalder in the frame. “To have her hair move [as though Damon was touching it], I had to have a green rod come in in the middle of the scene and move her hair, and she had to just keep in the moment, even though we were throwing all these curveballs at her,” Grismer says. “She did a great job.”

And for those wondering, he believes Somerhalder did improvise the “baby.”

Listen to the clip below. READ FULL STORY

'The Normal Heart' ratings solid

The Sunday premiere of The Normal Heart — Ryan Murphy’s stellar adaptation of Larry Kramer’s play about the HIV-AIDS crisis in early ’80s New York City  –  was a solid hit for HBO. 

The movie, which starred Mark Ruffalo and Matt Bomer, averaged 1.4 million viewers across two plays Sunday. The premiere at 9 averaged just under one million viewers, with an additional 434,000 at 11:15.

Its premiere ranks fifth in viewership among the 17 films that HBO has premiered since 2010.

 

Top 50 most-watched shows of 2013-14

Which show had you gathering around the TV the most this season? The results probably won’t surprise you Mark Harmon lovers, but there are plenty of bragging rights to go around for the James Spader and Blake Shelton fan clubs.

Here are the top 50 most-watched shows among viewers (not to be confused with the top 50 shows in the 18-49 demo, which you can see by clicking here): READ FULL STORY

Top 50 broadcast TV shows of 2013-14

The 2013-14 TV season for the broadcast nets ends this week — and no surprise, football continues to reign supreme for NBC. Here are the top 50 top 55 shows (because lots are tied) among adults 18-49 for the TV season that began Sept. 23.

Each rating point in the 18-49 demo equals 1.3 million viewers.  READ FULL STORY

Remaining 'Enlisted' episodes to air in June

Enlisted was one of the Upfronts’ most-lamented casualties, but Fox is making good on its promise to run four unaired episodes. The network confirms new episodes will premiere Sundays at 7 p.m. ET, starting June 1. Which means you can mourn the show again after the finale on June 22.

But we’ll always have this: READ FULL STORY

'The View' farewell to Barbara Walters rates big

Barbara Walters’ last day on The View was a ratings bonanza: The star-studded show that featured appearances from Hillary Clinton and Oprah Winfrey averaged 5.2 million viewers — the show’s fourth-ranked broadcast of all time, Nielsen says.

It was also the most-watched telecast in over a year and a half among women 18-49 (818,000) and women 25-54 (1 million).

Thursday’s telecast averaged 4.2 million and featured 11current and former View co-hosts for the first time on stage together.

On Friday, several female TV journalists filled the stage to pay tribute to Walters, including Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric, Jane Pauley, Connie Chung, Joan Lunden, Paula Zahn and Robin Roberts.

 

Billboard Music Awards most watched in 13 years

ABC took the winner’s trophy on Sunday thanks to a decent turnout for the Billboard Music Awards. The two-hour ceremony was the No. 1 show of the night in viewers (10.4 million) and adults 18-49 (3.5 rating), Nielsen says. It was also the most-watched Billboard telecast in 13 years.

CBS just edged out a second place spot in 18-49 (at least according to early estimates) by airing the season finales of The Amazing Race (1.7/5); The Good Wife (1.2/3, down 25% from last season’s finale) and The Mentalist (1.5/4, down 12% from last season’s finale). CBS’ most-watched show of the night was 60 Minutes at 9.8 million.

Fox had the second-highest rated program on the night in 18-49 in Family Guy (2.0). Bob’s Burgers got a .9, American Dad a 1.2; The Simpsons a 1.6, and Cosmos a 1.1. At 3.8 million, Family Guy was the net’s most-watched show.

NBC came in fourth with the special Coldplay: Ghost Stories (.4), American Dream Builders (.4) and the repeat special Women of SNL (.8), which was also the net’s most-watched show for the night at 2.8 million.

 

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