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Bob Costas eyes his return, NBC Olympics EP defends Bode Miller interview

After six nights away from his Fortress of Solitude desk, Bob Costas will return to NBC’s primetime Olympics coverage Monday night. Speaking on a conference call with reporters this afternoon, Costas categorized his pinkeye status: “On the injury list of 1 to 10, this is now at about a 2.” The light sensitivity and blurriness has subsided, but, “as people will see tonight, there’s still some redness there,” he said. “It won’t look as bad as it did the last night I was on the air. And probably it will look better 10 days from now, but the Olympics will be over, so you just go with it.” READ FULL STORY

Joel McHale to headline 100th White House Correspondents' Dinner

The Soup goes to Washington!

Community star Joel McHale — who also hosts E!’s weekly pop culture recap show — will headline the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, WHCA President Steven Thomma announced today.

“We’re thrilled that Joel will headline the dinner when we celebrate our centennial,” said Thomma on Twitter. “He’s sharp, funny, and just the type of comic who can navigate the unique challenge of our dinner, making fun of Democrats, Republicans and especially the news media. Washington can use a little good-natured ribbing.”

Last year, Conan O’Brien hosted the annual event, which skews both politicians and the media. (The most memorable Correspondents’ performance, however, is probably still Stephen Colbert’s blistering 2006 speech.) This year, the event — broadcast on CSPAN — will take place May 3.

In a likely preview of jokes to come, McHale tweeted, “This is very cool & the website to apply to host it worked perfectly.”

'Believe': Alfonso Cuaron, J.J. Abrams lead us through pilot's first scene -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

Believe — the NBC drama created by Oscar-nominated Gravity director Alfonso Cuarón (and exec produced with J.J. Abrams) — doesn’t premiere until March 10, but we’ve got your first look at how they shot the tone-setting opening sequence.

In it, the mysterious “sinister forces” hunting 10-year-old Bo (Johnny Sequoyah) — a girl with the powers of levitation and telekinesis and the abilities to control nature and see the future — crash her family’s car. “It, to me, was one of those great opening scenes that, when Alfonso described it, I had that sense of, ‘Wait a minute, I’m not changing the channel until I know exactly what’s going on,’” Abrams says in the video below.

So what is going on in the Cuarón-directed pilot? Bo’s protector, Milton Winter (Delroy Lindo), will be forced to enlist the help of Tate (Jake McLaughlin), a wrongfully imprisoned death row inmate, to protect Bo — and the two go on the run. READ FULL STORY

'Scrubs' Broadway musical: Everything you want to know, and why there won't be a movie -- EXCLUSIVE

First, NBC canceled Scrubs after seven seasons, then ABC picked it up before scrapping it again after season 9. By the time the ax finally fell on the hospital sitcom in 2010, creator Bill Lawrence had to agree that the show had come to a fair end. “We filmed so many episodes that I feel like it had played its full course,” says Lawrence, who tells EW that he currently has no plans to pursue a movie continuation of the series, despite the wishes of some fans. “You could argue Veronica Mars got cut short in its lifespan, but for us, I never really saw any life moving past nine years. It’s not really the type of show for a movie.”

Enter another idea for Lawrence: Rather than let the series (which still boasts around 13 million Facebook fans) completely fizzle out, Lawrence has set his sights on a different type of future for Scrubs. He announced back in September 2012 that he was developing a musical for Broadway, and just in time for EW’s cover story on the rebirth of Veronica Mars, we caught up with Lawrence to find out where his musical resurrection project stands. As it turns out, the sitcom might be scrubbing in to a Broadway theater near you by, oh, 2017 or so. READ FULL STORY

Sid Caesar dies at age 91

Sid Caesar, at once one of the greatest improvisors and one of the most rigorous sketch-comedy artists in television history, has died at the age of 91. His friend Larry King revealed Caesar’s passing Wednesday on Twitter.

Caesar was a modest dynamo, a man who disappeared into his comedy as though it was his escape from reality. A New York-born nightclub performer, he helped to usher in the dawn of the TV revolution. His 90-minute Saturday night variety program, Your Show of Shows, premiered in 1950. The live broadcast became a hit that lasted four years and immediately morphed into Caesar’s Hour, from 1954 to 1957. Eddy Friedfeld

The legendary writing staff of Your Show of Shows included Woody Allen, Neil Simon, Mel Brooks, and Larry Gelbart (the latter would go on to adapt M*A*S*H for TV). They wrote sketches that played off Caesar’s tall, broad-shouldered physique, casting him as everyone from Tarzan to blustering military types. (Brooks’ famous description of Caesar: “He could punch a Buick in the grille and kill it.”) READ FULL STORY

'Justified' postmortem: EP Graham Yost dissects 'Kill the Messenger'

Spoiler alert! If you haven’t watched this week’s episode of Justified, “Kill the Messenger” written by Ingrid Escajeda and directed by Don Kurt, stop reading now. As he’ll do throughout the season, showrunner Graham Yost takes us inside the writers room. READ FULL STORY

'Outlander' scoop: Author Diana Gabaldon to cameo

Fans of the hugely popular Outlander book series should keep their eyes peeled for author Diana Gabaldon when the much-anticipated adaptation bows on Starz later this year: She’ll make a cameo!

The Arizona-based author was in Scotland last week filming the episode. She wrote at length about her appearance on her Facebook page. “Now, originally, they’d asked if I’d like to be an extra, and I said sure, that might be fun, and the fans could play ‘Where’s Waldo?’ when the show is released. But some weeks later, they … the production team … emailed me to say that they’d been thinking about this. If I were an extra, I’d have to stand essentially in the same place for three days … as you can’t be pulling extras out of carefully composed crowd scenes and screwing up the painstaking configurations that the director and director of photography … have worked out. As the producer put it, ‘The novelty wears off quickly.

“They’d therefore come up with a better suggestion; Matt Roberts, the scriptwriter for this particular episode … would write a tiny scenelet for me. Just a couple of lines of dialogue. They could then film that pretty quickly on its own, and I’d then be released.”

Gabaldon is not allowed to reveal too much about her cameo, but she did write this much: “The lady in question is at the Gathering, and the scenelet in question takes place in one of the galleries over the Great Hall. I’m not supposed to post set photos or describe the sets in great detail—but hey, you’ve read the book. You know what it looks like.”

The series is expected to closely mirror the book, which follows Claire (Caitriona Balfe), a married combat nurse in the 1940s who’s vacationing with her husband (Tobias Menzies) in Scotland. Claire falls through a time-travel portal to the 18th century, where she falls in love with a young warrior (Sam Heughan). Ron Moore (Helix, Battlestar Gallactica) is executive producing.

'Psych': First look at '60s episode -- EXCLUSIVE PHOTOS

With news of USA’s Psych ending its run with the March 26 season 8 finale, devoted Psych-Os may need some cheering up today. How about a first look at the Feb. 26 episode that flashes back to the ’60s?

Star James Roday (Shawn) co-write the episode, “1967: A Psych Odyssey,” which marks the directorial debut of castmate Kirsten Nelson (Chief Vick). Hoping to secure an appointment as chief of police, Det. Lassiter (Timothy Omundson) decides to prove himself worthy by trying to solve the murder of the mayor’s uncle, Archie Baxter — who is also played by Omundson in flashback. READ FULL STORY

Winter Olympics: Peter Dinklage is the voice of NBC's opening ceremony tease

The Winter Olympics is coming! In an inspired move, NBC has enlisted Game of Thrones star Peter Dinklage to voice the opening tease for the montage that will begin its coverage of the opening ceremony, which airs Friday, Feb. 7 at 7:30 p.m. ET. NBC Olympics executive producer Jim Bell made the announcement via Twitter (with the hashtag #winteriscoming, of course).  READ FULL STORY

'Justified' postmortem: EP Graham Yost dissects 'Shot All to Hell'

Spoiler alert! If you haven’t watched this week’s episode of Justified, “Shot All to Hell” written by supervising producer Chris Provenzano and directed by Adam Arkin, stop reading now. As he’ll do throughout the season, showrunner Graham Yost takes us inside the writers room.  READ FULL STORY

Study: Jay Leno's favorite target was Clinton

Jay-Leno-Monologue.jpg

Hey Jay Leno: the ’90s want their jokes back!

According to a study from the Center for Media Affairs at George Mason University, the outgoing host of The Tonight Show relied heavily on yuks about Bill Clinton while delivering his monologue over the last two decades. In fact, one out of every 10 political jokes was about the 42nd President.

The center’s study covered 43,892 jokes about public figures and public affairs that were told by Leno between 1992 and 2014. “Leno’s monologues focused on power and scandal, and Bill Clinton was the top two-fer,” said Prof. Robert Lichter of the CMPA.

All told, Leno made 4,601 Clinton jokes. Democrats, as a whole, were the target of 10,885 yuks — 15% more than the 9,465 jokes that were lobbed against the GOP.

Here were his top 10 political targets:

1. Bill Clinton (4,607)
2. George Bush (3,239)
3. Al Gore (1,026)
4. Barack Obama (1,011)
5. Hillary Clinton (939)
6. Dick Cheney (673)
7. Monica Lewinsky (454)
8. Bob Dole (452)
9. John McCain (426)
10. Mitt Romney (361)

Besides Simpson (795 jokes), Leno’s top celebrity targets were Michael Jackson (505), Martha Stewart (208) and Paris Hilton (153). Leno’s last day on The Tonight Show is this Friday.

'Walking Dead' star to appear on 'Archer' for multi-episode arc -- EXCLUSIVE

The survivors on The Walking Dead haven’t had a lot to laugh about lately, what with one of their own being executed and the loss of the prison fortress they called home. However, one of the actresses on the show recently had an opportunity to explore her comedic side when she went in to record a multi-episode arc for FX’s Archer. Who is that mystery actress? Well, judging by the photo above you’ve probably already figured it out: It’s Lauren Cohan, who plays farmer’s daughter turned complete badass Maggie Greene on the zombie drama. READ FULL STORY

EW Radio talks to Baby-Daddy TV pioneer Maury Povich

In a special installment of tonight’s Inside TV show on EW Radio, I’ll focus on three of TV’s most enduring programs — America’s Funniest Home Videos, COPs and Maury.

After talking with AFHV founder Vin Di Bona and COPS creator John Langley, Maury Povich will come on to not only chat about tabloid TV but to answer this burning question: who is the true pioneer of Who’s Your Daddy TV?

Here’s what he said: READ FULL STORY

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