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'Breaking Bad,' 1 year later: Emmy-winning team tells 'Ozymandias' secrets

With the final four episodes of Breaking Bad looming last fall, Vince Gilligan hinted, “A great many chickens will come home to roost for Walt.” And, sure enough, in “Ozymandias,” the third-to-last episode of AMC’s harrowing, Emmy-winning meth drama, many of said chickens knocked down the front door of his house and made themselves comfortable in his living room.

During that hour of punishing and mesmerizing television, Walt (Bryan Cranston) would lose much of his blood money and most of his family (except for his baby daughter, whom he kidnapped in a moment of desperation), the latter being the reason that he supposedly turned to a life of meth kingpinnery in the first place. READ FULL STORY

Emmys: Jeff Jensen and Melissa Maerz on a show that made TV seem small

JEFF JENSEN: Melissa, for all the self-serving yet correct talk about how expansive and diverse and ambitious television has become over the past few years, the Emmys made TV seem rather small last night.

Maybe I lost my sense of humor over the summer (too much Rectify and Ferguson, I guess), but Seth Meyers didn’t work for me. The Late Night comedian—at his best when seated behind a desk, gleefully reading his sharp, tart jokes and engaging guests with smart chat—kept the show flowing and didn’t fumble. He was an effective game manager, but nothing more. And he simply lacks the presence and dynamism that an event like this requires.

Meyers invoked his former Saturday Night Live pals Tina Fey and Amy Poehler and their ace work hosting the Golden Globes, but inviting the comparison only hurt him. (Could they host the Emmys next year? Check that: Can they host everything, like, from now on?) His funniest bit was the “Billy On The Street” video he did with Billy Eichner—and there, Eichner was dragging him along like luggage. (Emmy and NBC would have been better served by Jimmy Fallon, whose strengths—playful and inventive interaction with celebs; genuinely sincere gushing—seem ideally suited to emceeing a kudosfest.) READ FULL STORY

Julia Louis-Dreyfus: Bryan Cranston is a 'pretty good' kisser

Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Bryan Cranston were big winners at the Emmys—and not just because they both took home awards.

The Veep and Breaking Bad stars were the talk of the night after smooching on live television as Louis-Dreyfus made her way to the stage after winning for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series. “It was pretty good,” the actress said backstage of the kiss. “He went for it, man. I appreciate that. He goes for it in everything he does.”

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'Breaking Bad' wins program of the year at TCA Awards

On Saturday, the 30th annual TCA Awards named Breaking Bad program of the year for the second year in a row. However, Bad did not face off against True Detective—its biggest rival in the upcoming Emmy race—which instead took home the award for outstanding miniseries. Matthew McConaughey was also honored for his work in True Detective.

Netflix hit Orange is the New Black won for best new program, and the Emmy-snubbed The Good Wife was named top drama.

In the comedy category, Veep tied with Louie for best comedy, while Veep star Julia Louis-Dreyfus was also honored.

Other winners included Saturday Night Live, which snagged the Television Critics Association’s Heritage Award, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey, which won for news and information, and RuPaul’s Drag Race, which was honored in reality programming.

Finally, ABC Family’s The Fosters won for youth programming, and James Burrows took home the Career Achievement Award.

All in all, HBO came out on top with the most awards of any network.

'Better Call Saul' will take place before, during, and after 'Breaking Bad'

We may not have seen the last of Walter White.

Peter Gould, executive producer of AMC’s Breaking Bad spinoff Better Call Saul, told the New York Daily News that the spinoff will jump between decades and may even include scenes that take place during the Breaking Bad timeline. This means that there’s a chance Bryan Cranston will reprise his three-time Emmy-winning role as school teacher-turned-meth kingpin Walter White. READ FULL STORY

AMC orders second season of 'Breaking Bad' spin-off 'Better Call Saul,' moves season 1 debut to early 2015 -- PHOTO

AMC is already calling Saul again. The network announced Thursday that it had picked up a second season of Better Call Saul, the Breaking Bad spin-off starring Bob Odenkirk, before the first episode of the show has even aired. READ FULL STORY

'Breaking Bad' spin-off adds three cast members

Better Call Saul has a trio of actors on the line: Patrick Fabian, Rhea Seehorn, and Michael Mando are joining the cast of AMC’s highly anticipated Breaking Bad spin-off, EW has confirmed. (Deadline first reported the news.) Fabian’s credits include The Last Exorcism and The Newsroom, Seehorn has starred on Whitney and appeared on Franklin & Bash, while Mando has guest-starred on Orphan Black and Pysch. Details on their roles are being kept under wraps. READ FULL STORY

'Breaking Bad' spin-off casts Michael McKean

Better Call Saul has dialed up a third cast member. READ FULL STORY

Vince Gilligan on the 'Breaking Bad' finale, the abandoned 'Wild Bunch' bloodbath ending, and the all-time best finale

All Bad things must come to an end, read the tagline for the final season of Breaking Bad. And when the revered drug drama came barreling to a finish last September, creator Vince Gilligan, his writers, Bryan Cranston, Aaron Paul, and the rest of the cast sent off Walt in a machine-gun blaze of tragic glory — and it was good. And that’s no easy task. For EW’s “The Art of Saying Goodbye” story, which ran in the April 11 issue, we interviewed the masterminds behind 10 iconic series, who discussed the formidable challenges of concocting the perfect farewell episode. Here, in a bonus Q&A, Gilligan — who wrote and directed the send-off, titled “Felina” — dishes on the process of crafting the last installment of the critically adored drug drama, provocative ideas for the endings that were abandoned, how the spin-off Better Call Saul factored into the plans, and his all-time favorite TV finale. READ FULL STORY

Spanish 'Breaking Bad' remake 'Metastasis' vs. the original: What's new? PHOTOS

The bad news is you’re suffering from Breaking Bad withdrawal. The good news? Fans of the hit AMC show — which wrapped up its five-season run in a gripping finale last fall — can look forward to an upcoming Spanish language remake that has plenty in common with Vince Gilligan’s Emmy-winning drama.

Or will it? Sure, true to the original, Walter Blanco — his last name means “white” — is a timid chemistry teacher who transforms into a meth-dealing mastermind after he’s diagnosed with lung cancer. But there are also a few notable differences too, which make Metástasis a blend of high-stakes telenovela drama and American cable TV storytelling. (Never fear: Gilligan consulted on the Colombian remake.) Here are a few of the most striking differences — with the promise of a lot more to come when the show premieres in July in the United States on Univision-owned network UniMás.

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'Breaking Bad' alum Betsy Brandt joins cast of ABC drama 'The Club'

Betsy Brandt is set to return to the drama world: The Breaking Bad veteran, who starred this season on NBC comedy The Michael J. Fox Show, has signed on to ABC’s The Club, the network confirmed Monday. It’s the second dramatic gig this month for Brandt, who just scored a recurring role in the second season of Showtime’s Masters of Sex. READ FULL STORY

'Better Call Saul': Jonathan Banks joins 'Breaking Bad' spin-off

One of the big questions surrounding Breaking Bad spin-off Better Call Saul has been: Will any characters from the original show be seen conspiring with shady criminal lawyer Saul Goodman (Bob Odenkirk)? The answer: You can Banks on it.

Jonathan Banks — a.k.a. lethal, world-weary fixer Mike Ehrmantraut on AMC’s acclaimed drug drama — has signed on as a series regular, the network confirmed today. (Deadline first reported the news.) The one-hour prequel, which is being overlorded by BB creator Vince Gilligan and co-executive producer Peter Gould, will focus on Goodman’s legal wheeling and dealings before crossing paths with chemistry teacher-turned-crystal meth king Walter White (Bryan Cranston). The casting of Banks makes sense: In addition to serving as the head of security for drug and chicken lord Gustavo Fring (Giancarlo Esposito), and later partnering up with Walter and Jesse (Aaron Paul), Mike worked as a PI/cleaner in association with Saul. Banks joined Breaking Bad at the end of season 2 and received an Emmy nomination in season 5 for his role, which ended when [SPOILER ALERT] Mike was murdered by Walt. READ FULL STORY

Final 'Breaking Bad' episodes to hit Netflix

Already remembering how much you miss Breaking Bad, which just took home its well-deserved Best Drama award at last night’s Golden Globes? The good news is, you’ll soon be able relive all the heart-wrenching — and heart-pounding — moments of last season whenever you want, as Netflix has announced its plans to make the final eight episodes available on Feb. 24. This also means that series, which ended its five-year run in September, will now be able to viewed in its entirety — a perfect time to introduce that one friend or family member to the exploits of Walter White.

Additionally, Netflix has signed a deal that will allow it to stream the anticipated Breaking Bad prequel Better Call Saul, which is expected to debut on AMC this fall.

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