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'Breaking Bad' alum Betsy Brandt joins cast of ABC drama 'The Club'

Betsy Brandt is set to return to the drama world: The Breaking Bad veteran, who starred this season on NBC comedy The Michael J. Fox Show, has signed on to ABC’s The Club, the network confirmed Monday. It’s the second dramatic gig this month for Brandt, who just scored a recurring role in the second season of Showtime’s Masters of Sex. READ FULL STORY

'Better Call Saul': Jonathan Banks joins 'Breaking Bad' spin-off

One of the big questions surrounding Breaking Bad spin-off Better Call Saul has been: Will any characters from the original show be seen conspiring with shady criminal lawyer Saul Goodman (Bob Odenkirk)? The answer: You can Banks on it.

Jonathan Banks — a.k.a. lethal, world-weary fixer Mike Ehrmantraut on AMC’s acclaimed drug drama — has signed on as a series regular, the network confirmed today. (Deadline first reported the news.) The one-hour prequel, which is being overlorded by BB creator Vince Gilligan and co-executive producer Peter Gould, will focus on Goodman’s legal wheeling and dealings before crossing paths with chemistry teacher-turned-crystal meth king Walter White (Bryan Cranston). The casting of Banks makes sense: In addition to serving as the head of security for drug and chicken lord Gustavo Fring (Giancarlo Esposito), and later partnering up with Walter and Jesse (Aaron Paul), Mike worked as a PI/cleaner in association with Saul. Banks joined Breaking Bad at the end of season 2 and received an Emmy nomination in season 5 for his role, which ended when [SPOILER ALERT] Mike was murdered by Walt. READ FULL STORY

Final 'Breaking Bad' episodes to hit Netflix

Already remembering how much you miss Breaking Bad, which just took home its well-deserved Best Drama award at last night’s Golden Globes? The good news is, you’ll soon be able relive all the heart-wrenching — and heart-pounding — moments of last season whenever you want, as Netflix has announced its plans to make the final eight episodes available on Feb. 24. This also means that series, which ended its five-year run in September, will now be able to viewed in its entirety — a perfect time to introduce that one friend or family member to the exploits of Walter White.

Additionally, Netflix has signed a deal that will allow it to stream the anticipated Breaking Bad prequel Better Call Saul, which is expected to debut on AMC this fall.

How will 'Breaking Bad' cast celebrate Golden Globes win? 'Wife-swapping'

The Breaking Bad victory tour is far from over. The latest stop was Sunday’s Golden Globes, where the series’ final season picked up the prize for Best TV Drama. So how will the cast celebrate?

“I think we’re going to wife-swap,” Bryan Cranston told reporters backstage, as co-stars Aaron Paul and RJ Mitte about fell over in laughter. “That’s been discussed. Wife-swapping. You know, you put your card in the basket…”

In all seriousness, though, Cranston marveled at how the show’s consistently growing fanbase took the show out on the highest note possible. “The fans took us to this level that none of us could have anticipated, the zeitgeist of it all,” he said. “And even though Walter White is dead, he seems to be able to stay alive somehow on life-support systems.”

Bryan Cranston finally wins Best Actor in a TV Drama at Golden Globes

Bryan Cranston finally won his first Golden Globe after his fourth consecutive nomination for playing Walter White on AMC’s Breaking Bad, which also picked up its first Globe for Best Drama. Cranston, who was also once nominated for Malcolm in the Middle, said his win was a lovely way to say goodbye to the show that meant so much to him. And, he noted, now everyone in the world will be able to share in Breaking Bad‘s “mirth and merriment.”

Cranston has won three Emmys for Breaking Bad, which aired its series finale last September.

Directors Guild TV nominations: Bryan Cranston nominated for 'Breaking Bad' and 'Modern Family'

Now that Breaking Bad is over, Bryan Cranston can pursue his side career full-time. The actor picked up two Directors Guild television nominations on Thursday: one for directing an episode of BB, and one for Modern Family.

Winners will be announced at the DGA Awards dinner on Feb. 25. Check out all the film nominees here, and the full list of TV nominees below:
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'Breaking Bad' creator Vince Gilligan on the finale, 'Better Call Saul' and his acting debut on 'Community'

2013 was the breakout year for Breaking Bad. The critically adored meth drama, which had enthralled a fervent yet modest-sized fanbase, went next level with its final eight episodes, rocketing to record ratings while dominating talk on Twitter and around watercoolers. Before the New Mexico dust had settled, the show also scored its first Outstanding Drama Series Emmy. For those reasons and more, Breaking Bad was named as one of EW’s Entertainers of the Year and EW critic Melissa Maerz’s No. 1 TV show of 2013, while season 5’s “Ozymandias” topped our Best Episodes of 2013 list. Series creator Vince Gilligan talked with EW about his year to remember, Breaking Bad‘s finale, the plans for spin-off prequel Better Call Saul, his upcoming guest spot on Community and the person he’s dying to work with.
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'Breaking Bad' creator: Jesse probably got caught because he forgot this

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We’d like to think Jesse Pinkman is hanging out in some dive bar in Anchorage enjoying his new life, but if you look at Breaking Bad‘s finale honestly and realistically … creator Vince Gilligan notes that probably didn’t actually happen.

“My personal feeling is that he got away,” Gilligan said to GQ magazine, echoing what he told us previously. But then Gilligan had to add: “But the most likely thing, as negative as this sounds, is that they’re going to find this kid’s fingerprints all over this lab and they’re going to find him within a day or a week or a month. And he’s still going to be on the hook for the murder of two federal agents.”

Fingerprints in the lab! Of course … Pinkman should have torched the lab before he rage-crashed out the gate. But you can hardly blame the guy for not wanting to spend another second in that compound where he worked as a meth-slave.  Aw, what a bummer coda….

Gilligan tried to reassure: “But yeah, even though that’s the most likely outcome, the way I see it is that he got away and got to Alaska, changed his name, and had a new life. You want that for the kid. He deserves it.” READ FULL STORY

'Breaking Bad': Watch Bryan Cranston and Dean Norris film the 'tread lightly' scene -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

When Breaking Bad returned for the second half of its final season back in August, everyone seemed to have a pretty good idea of how the Walt-Hank story line would unfold. Still reeling from that bathroom-reading revelation in the midseason finale that Walt (Bryan Cranston) was actually the crystal meth kingpin that he’d been tracking, Hank (Dean Norris) would methodically plot to take down his brother-in-law over the next few episodes before some sort of showdown occurred toward the end of the season. READ FULL STORY

'Breaking Bad': Preview the final season blooper reel -- VIDEO

Breaking Bad is considered one of the finest and darkest dramas of the new century, but critics and fans have also long delighted in its sly-and-dry comedy. You can see in the clips below how the actors wind up keeping things light on the set of the brutal meth drama with this collection of bloopers from the final season. The full gag reel can be found on Breaking Bad: The Complete Series (Nov. 26, Blu-ray), which also includes a two-hour-plus documentary about the making of the last eight episodes. (Click here to watch Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul reading the finale script for the first time.)

Press play and enjoy Matt “Badger” Jones versus a bong, Paul versus a pack of cigarettes, and Cranston versus two faucets and an A-1 door.
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'Breaking Bad' stars: See their stunned reaction reading the final script -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

You know how you felt when you watched the series finale of Breaking Bad? Now imagine if you’d been one of the people actually living in the complicated skin of these characters since 2006, when that groundbreaking pilot was shot. Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul decided to honor the last unforgiving leg of Walt and Jesse’s meth-making journey to hell by reading the finale script aloud together. (Fun fact: Paul actually had to delete a copy of the script from his email because he was so worried that he would sneak a peek.)

The pair convened in March at Cranston’s place in Albuquerque, ordered some Greek take-out, cracked open a few beers and tackled the “Felina” script for the first time, dividing up the roles between them. (Cranston, for example, played Todd and Marie while Paul assumed the roles of Skyler and Lydia.) As Paul told EW earlier this fall: “When we got to the final page, it was just… [He takes a deep breath.] Usually at the end of an episode, it says, ‘End of episode,’ but Bryan read, ‘End of series.’ And that was it. We sat there and just kind of looked at each other, not knowing what to say. But I could tell both of us were just so…so happy.” Recalled Cranston: “It was a moment of silence, like, wowww. We were just quiet for a while, realizing that was the last time we were ever going to read a Breaking Bad script. And then we looked at each other. There are people that you work with and you hope you would stay in touch with, and I know I’ll be a friend of Aaron’s forever.”

A camera crew that had been trailing the show for a two-hour-plus documentary on the making of the final season was on the scene for this moment, and their access is your gain. You can check it out on Breaking Bad: The Complete Series (Nov. 26), the barrel-shaped Blu-ray box set that contains all 62 episodes and 55 hours of special features. To preview their reading of “Felina” right now, watch the following video. And if you want a detailed report from the Breaking Bad set as Cranston & Co. filmed the last scene of the finale, click here. READ FULL STORY

'Breaking Bad': See the 'alternate ending' to the series finale -- UPDATE

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UPDATE: The alternate ending has been pulled from YouTube on copyright grounds.

For months — years, even — fans of Breaking Bad speculated how the AMC drama would wrap up the story of Walter White (Bryan Cranston), a harmless chemistry teacher who became a murderous meth maker. Asked earlier this year to name his favorite creative this-is-how-it-all-ends theory, Cranston told EW,  “The one that gets around the most is he goes into the witness protection program and that’s the start of Malcolm in the Middle. He goes into the witness protection program, his family is splintered, remarries and then begins Malcolm in the Middle.”

Cranston & Co. did wind up shooting a playful alternate ending for the series finale with a special guest, and it is featured on the Breaking Bad complete box set, which is being released on Nov. 26. Would you like to wait until then to see it? Hal, no! Check it out below.
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'The Good Wife' and the problem of too much good TV

The moment I finally became a fan of The Good Wife occurred just about three weeks ago. It came in the current season’s widely praised fifth episode, “Hitting The Fan.” This was the one where Will (Josh Charles) and Diane (Christine Baranski) fired Alicia (Julianna Margulies) and Cary (Matt Czuchry) for plotting to start their own firm. As Will progressed from betrayal (his reaction, a symphonically-performed shock-face culminating in a downbeat “what?!”, was priceless) to “commando mode” (rallying emergency quorums; hustling clients to keep them from bolting), and as Alicia progressed from resolute yet regretful to full-on “Oh, it’s so on!” (countering Will’s counter-attacks; wooing Chum Hum; an adrenaline rush quickie with Governor Hubby), it was thrilling to watch them find new energy and purpose in their lives amid the crisis, if slightly heartbreaking to watch the former lovers, now former colleagues, become enemies. It was impossible to take a side; I wanted both to win. In a story full of such grand drama and significant developments, it was a smaller, funnier exchange between Alicia and Will that grabbed me. As a contentious phone conversation came to a close (“Go to hell!” “No, you go to hell!”), Will remembered something very important. “Oh, your daughter called,” he said, suddenly civil. “She needs you to call her school to let her go on a field trip.” “Oh. When was this?” Alicia asked, equally pleasant. “About 40 minutes ago.”  “Thank you.” “You’re welcome.” Click. And then war resumed.

Not a terribly ingenious scene, I grant you. It hewed to a familiar screwball comedic structure. The whiplash tonal shift; two rivals abruptly making nice or banal in a way that almost feels out of character. Except here, the moment felt true to the characters, at least as I understand them so far. It was an effective way to dramatize that their relationship was more complex than their current conflict, to show that neither of them should be defined by the crisis/concerns consuming them at present; and it was a moment that was representative of all of everything else in the show that was converting me to rabid Good Wife fandom. READ FULL STORY

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