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Tag: Christine Baranski (1-3 of 3)

Here's why Diane Lockhart is the best character on 'The Good Wife'

First of all, we know: everyone is awesome on The Good Wife. (We love you, Alicia and Eli and Jackie and Finn and Will Gardner’s Ghost!)

But on this yearand certainly we can all agree that the show’s fifth season was truly extraordinary, as well as ridiculously snubbed by the Emmys—it was Diane Lockhart who managed to get even more awesome. After all, she had a lot to contend with: She was up for and lost a Supreme Court nomination. Her fourth years left to start a competing company. There’s a Game of Thrones-like power struggle threatening her future at the firm she created. READ FULL STORY

Christine Baranski also laments that 'Good Wife' Best Drama snub

The Good Wife started production on season 6 Thursday, but since Christine Baranski wasn’t on the call sheet, she distracted herself that morning with coffee and a swim as the Emmy nominations were announced. “One doesn’t want to invest too much in it, but that said, when you find out that you’ve got a nomination, it’s always a wonderful thing and a great privilege,” the 12-time nominee says. With one win for Cybill, this is her fifth consecutive nomination for The Good Wife. “I always get the biggest kick to hear I’m in a category with Maggie Smith,” she says. “It just kind of blows my mind.”

Still, the day is a little bittersweet, Baranski admits. “The anticipation, for me, was my really great hope that the show would be recognized and get a nomination this year, because I thought, as so many people did, that it was an extraordinary year for the show. The Kings, Robert and Michelle, and our writers did an extraordinary job of crafting season 5 and taking the show in that brave place—so much drama, so much emotion, so much craftsmanship went into those 22 episodes. The audience was really invested in it,” she says. “We’ve got three actors with nominations [including supporting actor Josh Charles and guest actor Dylan Baker], and that’s largely because we’re just given such great writing. I don’t follow Twitter or anything,” she continues, with a laugh, “but I guess the show’s getting a lot of press for being snubbed.” READ FULL STORY

'The Good Wife' and the problem of too much good TV

The moment I finally became a fan of The Good Wife occurred just about three weeks ago. It came in the current season’s widely praised fifth episode, “Hitting The Fan.” This was the one where Will (Josh Charles) and Diane (Christine Baranski) fired Alicia (Julianna Margulies) and Cary (Matt Czuchry) for plotting to start their own firm. As Will progressed from betrayal (his reaction, a symphonically-performed shock-face culminating in a downbeat “what?!”, was priceless) to “commando mode” (rallying emergency quorums; hustling clients to keep them from bolting), and as Alicia progressed from resolute yet regretful to full-on “Oh, it’s so on!” (countering Will’s counter-attacks; wooing Chum Hum; an adrenaline rush quickie with Governor Hubby), it was thrilling to watch them find new energy and purpose in their lives amid the crisis, if slightly heartbreaking to watch the former lovers, now former colleagues, become enemies. It was impossible to take a side; I wanted both to win. In a story full of such grand drama and significant developments, it was a smaller, funnier exchange between Alicia and Will that grabbed me. As a contentious phone conversation came to a close (“Go to hell!” “No, you go to hell!”), Will remembered something very important. “Oh, your daughter called,” he said, suddenly civil. “She needs you to call her school to let her go on a field trip.” “Oh. When was this?” Alicia asked, equally pleasant. “About 40 minutes ago.”  “Thank you.” “You’re welcome.” Click. And then war resumed.

Not a terribly ingenious scene, I grant you. It hewed to a familiar screwball comedic structure. The whiplash tonal shift; two rivals abruptly making nice or banal in a way that almost feels out of character. Except here, the moment felt true to the characters, at least as I understand them so far. It was an effective way to dramatize that their relationship was more complex than their current conflict, to show that neither of them should be defined by the crisis/concerns consuming them at present; and it was a moment that was representative of all of everything else in the show that was converting me to rabid Good Wife fandom. READ FULL STORY

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