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L.A. Clippers' Chris Paul developing autobiographical comedy at ABC

It looks like basketball has been an untapped goldmine of comedic riches, as the Los Angeles Clippers’ Chris Paul is the latest in a string of NBA players to develop a comedy for television.

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Fox developing basketball comedy about former NBA player Baron Davis

Fox may have a fictional Latvian basketball player in New Girl‘s Winston, but a new comedy in development brings some professional NBA talent to the network.

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Jonathan Katz on the legacy of 'Dr. Katz' and his new album 'Dr. Katz Live'

In between Mystery Science Theater 3000 and South Park, Comedy Central’s biggest breakout was a cheaply made animated show called Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist. Co-created by comedian Jonathan Katz and animator/producer Tom Snyder, it starred Katz as the titular shrink and his relationships with his receptionist (Laura Silverman) and his son (H. Jon Benjamin, now of Archer and Bob’s Burgers fame). The show was fleshed out by comedians like Ray Romano, Dom Irrera, Dave Attell, Louis C.K., Denis Leary, Jon Stewart, and Janeane Garofalo.

The show last aired in 2002, but a few years back, Katz dusted off his old Dr. Katz character to perform a live show, which is finally getting an audio release today as Dr. Katz Live. The special features Katz going through his own session with Snyder (who plays Katz’s therapist), then finds him welcoming Andy Kindler, Eugene Mirman, and B.J. Novak. “These live shows are very different,” Katz explains. “In the cartoon, I was essentially a straight man. In the live show, Tom Snyder plays my therapist, so I get to make jokes. Part of the deal is that he is there to sit in on sessions with my patients, and nobody gives him permission. We’re all sitting on the stage within earshot of each other, and we were pretending that Tom couldn’t hear us even though he’s ten feet away from us.” READ FULL STORY

Dane Cook talks 'Troublemaker,' Louis C.K., and all the haters

The mid-2000s were some pretty damn good years for Dane Cook. In ’06, the Comedy Central alum’s Retaliation became the bestselling comedy album in 28 years, going platinum; Rolling Stone named him Hot Comic of the Year. Cook was the comic messiah of frat boys.

Then in late ’07—the same year Cook became the second comedian ever to sell out at Madison Square Garden—the tides began to turn against him, as they often do. Of course, Cook always had detractors—but at some point, the loathing reached critical mass, tipping the scales of public consensus. Dane Cook-fatigue set in. Accusations of stealing jokes from the likes of Joe Rogan and Louis C.K. were hurled, and an ugly blitz of online haters ensued.

Then Cook, 42, hit a rough patch personally, too. “I lost both my mom and dad to cancer within nine months and it was brutal. I was close with them—my mom was my best friend. I took a year off in 2010, and my goal was [to] work as hard on myself as I ever have on my standup. And I’m glad I did that, because I can honestly say that I feel now very similar to how I felt before the first CD broke, which was all love.” READ FULL STORY

5 fun facts about how 'Saturday Night Live' made its title sequence

Saturday Night Live alters the style of its opening credit sequence and commercial bumpers every few years, making adjustments for cast additions and departures in the years between. This year is no different, especially as the show celebrates its 40th anniversary. But there’s more to the process than most viewers would think.

On Wednesday, Alex Buono, director of photography on SNL‘s film unit, posted a lengthy explainer about making this year’s opener. Whether you’re a film aficionado looking for detailed discussions of camera lenses, an SNL fan looking for behind-the-scenes details, or a layperson simply interested in learning something new, the post is filled with fascinating tidbits. Here are a few of the best. READ FULL STORY

'Cristela' creator talks sitcom inspiration, 'Golden Girls'

Cristela Alonzo has come a long way from her childhood, eight years of which she spent living with her family in an abandoned diner in South Texas. It wasn’t exactly the townhouse from her favorite childhood sitcom, The Cosby Show. Which is why it’s funny that years later, the 35-year-old comedian now has her own semi-autobiographical show, about a law student-turned-intern who tries to balance her career with the concerns of family life.

“I think I got here because I grew up really poor,” Alonzo says of her piecemeal-to-primetime story. “My family didn’t have money and I think it made me fearless. I’m willing to try everything and not be afraid because what’s the worst that can be happen? It might not work out but I can’t be worse off than when I was a kid.” READ FULL STORY

'Uganda Be Kidding me' react: Chelsea Handler nails Netflix debut

“Are there any black people here?” Chelsea Handler asks as she pans the audience, one minute into Uganda Be Kidding Me Live. “Smile, so I can see you.” Mildly offended? Morally upright readers, stop reading now—you’re strongly advised to skip Netflix’s new, horribly funny stand-up comedy special. READ FULL STORY

Watch the first clip from Doug Benson's 'Doug Dynasty' Netflix special

Sure, original series like House of Cards and Orange Is the New Black get all the digital ink, but Netflix’s strongest original programming lies in the incredible string of stand-up specials the service has premiered. Like HBO or Comedy Central before them, Netflix has become an outlet for long-form comedy for both established names (Aziz Ansari, Chelsea Handler, Marc Maron) and up-and-comers (Moshe Kasher, Jim Jeffries).

Add comic and compulsive podcaster Doug Benson to that list of talent. His new special, Doug Dynasty, will be premiering on Netflix on Nov. 6. If you know Benson, it’s either because you listen to one of his many EW-approved podcasts (including Doug Loves Movies and Getting Doug With High) or because you loved his fantastically funny film Super High Me. (He has also made a habit out of being one of the dominant panelists on @midnight.) READ FULL STORY

'Goldbergs' brothers Adam and Barry rock out to Twisted Sister in new clip

“We were the stuff of legends,” says Sean Giambrone as Adam Goldberg in the upcoming episode of The Goldbergs. “Well, in our minds.”

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Groundlings comedians accuse 'Saturday Night Live' of stealing sketch

River boats are apparently a hot spot for Tina Turner impersonators.

After Saturday Night Live aired a sketch in which Cecily Strong, Sasheer Zamata, and host Sarah Silverman donned Turner-style wigs and flashy red dresses, two comedians from improv company the Groundlings took to Twitter to point out that the SNL sketch was strikingly similar to one of their own.  READ FULL STORY

'A to Z' premiere react: Feldman, Milioti elevate lackluster love story

A to Z lays out its hand in the opening minutes of the pilot. Narrator Katey Sagal explains that lead characters Andrew and Zelda “will date for 8 months, 3 weeks, 5 days, and 1 hour. This television program is the comprehensive account of their relationship, from A to Z.” The show has an endgame in mind from the start and seems overly aware of its existence as a romantic comedy—those frequent (500) Days of Summer comparisons in recent months are more than apt.

While the show can’t quite live up to its predecessors in the initial outing, the first episode, “A is for Acquaintances,” is an incredible example of how the chemistry between two leads can carry a show that stumbles more often than not.

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'Bad Judge' premiere react: Pilot lives up to its name in quality, not in spirit

The pilot to Bad Judge feels off. That’s not unexpected for a show that’s already had two showrunners, a heavily revised first episode, and major cast alterations before the pilot has even premiered. Out of all of the behind-the-scenes calamity, though, comes a pilot that looks more like Frankenstein’s Monster than a half-hour comedy. It’s an episode that stitches together parts of completely different concepts in the hopes of making something cohesive, but instead delivers an episode nothing short of erratic.

In the patchwork of a pilot, Bad Judge is missing just about every key ingredient—coherent plotting, concrete characterization, and, most importantly, actual jokes.

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NBC orders 'Peter Pan'-inspired comedy told from Wendy's point of view

NBC can’t get enough of Peter Pan, it seems. While the network is currently underway on a live-action musical version of the classic tale, NBC has now also ordered a modern-day, half-hour comedy loosely based on J.M. Barrie’s characters Wendy and Peter.

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