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Showtime's 'Inside Comedy' returning for fourth season

The critically acclaimed documentary series Inside Comedy is returning to Showtime for its fourth season. Stephen Colbert, Bryan Cranston, and Dan Aykroyd are just a few of the big names expected to stop by this time around.

The one-on-one interviews introduce audiences to comedians beyond their jokes, reflecting on career-defining moments, influences, and hilarious stories from the inner workings of the comedy world.

Creator David Steinberg will continue to host, with co-creator Steve Carell acting as executive producer.

“Inside Comedy” premiered in 2012, and all of the episodes are available to watch online through Showtime. Season 4 is slated for premiere later this year.

A step-by-step guide to the medieval musical numbers of 'Galavant'

ABC is galloping into the unknown with its half-hour medieval musical comedy Galavant, premiering January 4 at 8 p.m. for four consecutive double-episode weeks. Starring Joshua Sasse as the tuneful hero (with guest appearances by the likes of Ricky Gervais as a potion peddler and John Stamos as a medieval John Stamos), the show features adventure, chivalry, and magic—not to mention musical numbers by Disney legend Alan Menken (The Little Mermaid, Aladdin, everything else from your childhood). We took a look at how Galavant‘s Broadway-style songs get the royal treatment, from start to finish. READ FULL STORY

HBO orders Sarah Silverman-led pilot

Sarah Silverman is returning to HBO with a comedy pilot.

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Watch an exclusive clip from the Darren Star's new series, 'Younger'

TV Land—known for Hot in Cleveland and its reruns of classic sitcoms—is targeting Younger audiences with the announcement that its newest comedy, starring Sutton Foster and Hilary Duff, will premiere on March 31 of next year. READ FULL STORY

'Arrested Development' creator: A new, chronological version of season 4 is on its way

Whether you loved or hated it, Arrested Development‘s fourth season was a departure for the show, telling its story out of sequence as each episode focused on a single character’s perspective. Sometimes it worked (i.e., Maeby’s episode) and sometimes it didn’t (some of George Sr. or Lindsay’s episodes), but it appears fans will now have a chance to watch the show in a brand-new way.

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'Portlandia' season 5 sneak peek presents the perfect goth funeral

Making arrangements for your own funeral can be a macabre experience, but for two darker characters on Portlandia, it’s more exciting than their birthdays.

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Watch the 'It's Always Sunny' cast shoot into space in season 10 trailer

Its-Always-Sunny

At this point, is it surprising the Paddy’s pub gang could scheme themselves into flying into space?

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L.A. Clippers' Chris Paul developing autobiographical comedy at ABC

It looks like basketball has been an untapped goldmine of comedic riches, as the Los Angeles Clippers’ Chris Paul is the latest in a string of NBA players to develop a comedy for television.

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Fox developing basketball comedy about former NBA player Baron Davis

Fox may have a fictional Latvian basketball player in New Girl‘s Winston, but a new comedy in development brings some professional NBA talent to the network.

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Jonathan Katz on the legacy of 'Dr. Katz' and his new album 'Dr. Katz Live'

In between Mystery Science Theater 3000 and South Park, Comedy Central’s biggest breakout was a cheaply made animated show called Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist. Co-created by comedian Jonathan Katz and animator/producer Tom Snyder, it starred Katz as the titular shrink and his relationships with his receptionist (Laura Silverman) and his son (H. Jon Benjamin, now of Archer and Bob’s Burgers fame). The show was fleshed out by comedians like Ray Romano, Dom Irrera, Dave Attell, Louis C.K., Denis Leary, Jon Stewart, and Janeane Garofalo.

The show last aired in 2002, but a few years back, Katz dusted off his old Dr. Katz character to perform a live show, which is finally getting an audio release today as Dr. Katz Live. The special features Katz going through his own session with Snyder (who plays Katz’s therapist), then finds him welcoming Andy Kindler, Eugene Mirman, and B.J. Novak. “These live shows are very different,” Katz explains. “In the cartoon, I was essentially a straight man. In the live show, Tom Snyder plays my therapist, so I get to make jokes. Part of the deal is that he is there to sit in on sessions with my patients, and nobody gives him permission. We’re all sitting on the stage within earshot of each other, and we were pretending that Tom couldn’t hear us even though he’s ten feet away from us.” READ FULL STORY

Dane Cook talks 'Troublemaker,' Louis C.K., and all the haters

The mid-2000s were some pretty damn good years for Dane Cook. In ’06, the Comedy Central alum’s Retaliation became the bestselling comedy album in 28 years, going platinum; Rolling Stone named him Hot Comic of the Year. Cook was the comic messiah of frat boys.

Then in late ’07—the same year Cook became the second comedian ever to sell out at Madison Square Garden—the tides began to turn against him, as they often do. Of course, Cook always had detractors—but at some point, the loathing reached critical mass, tipping the scales of public consensus. Dane Cook-fatigue set in. Accusations of stealing jokes from the likes of Joe Rogan and Louis C.K. were hurled, and an ugly blitz of online haters ensued.

Then Cook, 42, hit a rough patch personally, too. “I lost both my mom and dad to cancer within nine months and it was brutal. I was close with them—my mom was my best friend. I took a year off in 2010, and my goal was [to] work as hard on myself as I ever have on my standup. And I’m glad I did that, because I can honestly say that I feel now very similar to how I felt before the first CD broke, which was all love.” READ FULL STORY

5 fun facts about how 'Saturday Night Live' made its title sequence

Saturday Night Live alters the style of its opening credit sequence and commercial bumpers every few years, making adjustments for cast additions and departures in the years between. This year is no different, especially as the show celebrates its 40th anniversary. But there’s more to the process than most viewers would think.

On Wednesday, Alex Buono, director of photography on SNL‘s film unit, posted a lengthy explainer about making this year’s opener. Whether you’re a film aficionado looking for detailed discussions of camera lenses, an SNL fan looking for behind-the-scenes details, or a layperson simply interested in learning something new, the post is filled with fascinating tidbits. Here are a few of the best. READ FULL STORY

'Cristela' creator talks sitcom inspiration, 'Golden Girls'

Cristela Alonzo has come a long way from her childhood, eight years of which she spent living with her family in an abandoned diner in South Texas. It wasn’t exactly the townhouse from her favorite childhood sitcom, The Cosby Show. Which is why it’s funny that years later, the 35-year-old comedian now has her own semi-autobiographical show, about a law student-turned-intern who tries to balance her career with the concerns of family life.

“I think I got here because I grew up really poor,” Alonzo says of her piecemeal-to-primetime story. “My family didn’t have money and I think it made me fearless. I’m willing to try everything and not be afraid because what’s the worst that can be happen? It might not work out but I can’t be worse off than when I was a kid.” READ FULL STORY

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