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Tag: Comedy (14-26 of 123)

'A to Z' premiere react: Feldman, Milioti elevate lackluster love story

A to Z lays out its hand in the opening minutes of the pilot. Narrator Katey Sagal explains that lead characters Andrew and Zelda “will date for 8 months, 3 weeks, 5 days, and 1 hour. This television program is the comprehensive account of their relationship, from A to Z.” The show has an endgame in mind from the start and seems overly aware of its existence as a romantic comedy—those frequent (500) Days of Summer comparisons in recent months are more than apt.

While the show can’t quite live up to its predecessors in the initial outing, the first episode, “A is for Acquaintances,” is an incredible example of how the chemistry between two leads can carry a show that stumbles more often than not.

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'Bad Judge' premiere react: Pilot lives up to its name in quality, not in spirit

The pilot to Bad Judge feels off. That’s not unexpected for a show that’s already had two showrunners, a heavily revised first episode, and major cast alterations before the pilot has even premiered. Out of all of the behind-the-scenes calamity, though, comes a pilot that looks more like Frankenstein’s Monster than a half-hour comedy. It’s an episode that stitches together parts of completely different concepts in the hopes of making something cohesive, but instead delivers an episode nothing short of erratic.

In the patchwork of a pilot, Bad Judge is missing just about every key ingredient—coherent plotting, concrete characterization, and, most importantly, actual jokes.

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NBC orders 'Peter Pan'-inspired comedy told from Wendy's point of view

NBC can’t get enough of Peter Pan, it seems. While the network is currently underway on a live-action musical version of the classic tale, NBC has now also ordered a modern-day, half-hour comedy loosely based on J.M. Barrie’s characters Wendy and Peter.

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NBC and Adam Sandler adapting '80s satire 'Real Genius' into workplace comedy

NBC has come up with a really smart idea for their next workplace comedy.

The Peacock network is teaming with up Adam Sandler‘s Happy Madison Productions, 3 Arts Entertainment and Sony TV to reboot the 1985 film Real Genius as a comedy series. The original movie starred Val Kilmer as a college senior working on a chemical laser at the fictitious Pacific Tech University. The NBC reboot however will be a modern-day workplace comedy focusing on the relationship of two incompatible co-workers.

NBC has given the project written by Craig DiGregorio (Workaholics) and David King (Parks and Recreation) a script commitment plus penalty. 

These are the best sketches from each season of 'Saturday Night Live'

Before we begin, an explanation: This is not a list of the 39 best SNL sketches of all time.

Any institution that lasts as long as Saturday Night Live has—and that experiences as much cast and writer turnover as Saturday Night Live does—will necessarily have stronger years and leaner years. In SNL‘s case, the difference between eras can be especially stark; you’re more likely to laugh at a meh John Belushi sketch than you are at even the finest display of Charles Rocket’s talents. Given that fact, it’s easy for a simple “best sketches ever” list to focus only on the best-known work of SNL‘s biggest stars (your Will Ferrells, your Eddies Murphy) while totally ignoring its less memorable seasons—which also means that such a list won’t really provide an overview of the show’s long, tangled, uneven history.

Thus this: In honor of the show’s upcoming 40th season, EW‘s team of SNL experts has assembled an inventory of each individual season’s best sketch. You’ll find many familiar picks below, as well as more obscure selections—and, perhaps, the absence of a few sure things. (There’s no “Celebrity Jeopardy,” for example, both because those sketches aired during a particularly fertile period—how can you pick even Turd Ferguson over “More Cowbell”?—and because we included one of them in a magazine feature called “Build a Perfect SNL Episode.”) Scroll through—and don’t forget to vote for your favorite one by 5 p.m. ET Sept. 26 at our poll here.

Season 1, 1975–1976
“Word Association,” Dec. 13, 1975
What kind of janitorial company gives job applicants a racist psychological test? The one Saturday Night Live invented for one of the most audacious two-minute segments in TV history. Even nearly 40 years later, Chevy Chase and Richard Pryor’s tense pas de deux (“Jungle bunny!” “Honky!”…”N—–!” “Dead honky!”) is just as sharp as it was in the ’70s—not to mention every bit as uncomfortably funny. READ FULL STORY

Watch 'Key & Peele' characters come together in 'Where You At' music video

Comedy Central’s Key & Peele has debuted a number of memorable characters over its first three seasons, but few are more memorable than Luther, President Obama’s anger translator. He and the president are taking a break from their regular addresses to the American people, however, to premiere “Where You At,” an exclusive new music video that brings some of Key & Peele‘s favorites together for the first time.

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Chris Pratt talks end of 'Parks and Recreation': 'I think people are ready for it to be done'

Chris Pratt will officially become a big time movie star with today’s release of Guardians of The Galaxy (my personal pick for best film of the summer). And considering that GOTG is coming on the heels of The Lego Movie and will be followed by next year’s sure-to-be-massive Jurassic World…well, let’s just say Pratt (who stars in all three) has a lot of things to talk about. And we talked about all of those things when he stopped by the Entertainment Weekly Radio (SiriusXM, channel 105) studio this morning. But we also wanted to chat with Pratt (hey, they rhymes!) about the impending ending (again, rhymes!) of NBC’s Parks and Recreation, which will sign off after one final season. So how does Pratt feel about gearing up for the last go round in Pawnee? READ FULL STORY

'You're the Worst' gives the rom-com formula a mild case of crabs

Suggested alternate title: Love in the Time of Cynicism.

From the moment you see Jimmy Shive-Overly (Chris Geere) taking pictures of his junk during a wedding toast, it’s pretty clear You’re the Worst doesn’t celebrate Valentine’s Day. To wit, Jimmy is mid-waltz with the bride—his ex—when he informs her he’s only come to her wedding to gawk at the imminent “disaster” of love and marriage.

The surly new half-hour rom-com from Stephen Falk (Orange Is the New Black) presents a challenge for itself by offering up a character like Jimmy as its entrée into the series. Despite audiences’ seemingly insatiable appetite for antiheroes in basic-cable dramas, it’s fairly rare to lead a comedy with someone kind of awful (Worst‘s FX sibling Louie has been blazing that trail to much acclaim). How are viewers meant to fall in love with Jimmy, who’s as reactive as he is bitter? And, more importantly, how are they to believe a woman would fall in love with him? READ FULL STORY

'Reno 911!' creators remember the show 5 years later, talk potential reunion

On July 8, 2009, Reno 911! aired its season six finale, an episode titled “Wiegel’s Couple Therapy.” It concluded with Jones and Dangle telling a classroom of young children (in song!) that it’s okay to have gay parents; a fitting season finale, but not necessarily a fitting conclusion to the entire series.

After killing off series regulars Wendy McLendon-Covey, Carlos Alazraqui, and Mary Birdsong at the end of season five—a decision that some fans disagreed with—season six was the show’s most heavily debated. Still, that didn’t make it less shocking Comedy Central decided to pull the plug on Reno altogether that August.

Series creators Ben Garant and Thomas Lennon had never intended for “Wiegel’s Couple Therapy” to serve as the show’s true ending. So now, on the accidental series finale’s five-year anniversary, EW chatted with Lennon and Garant about how they’d planned to end the series, what their favorite episodes were, whether there’s hope for the future, and more. READ FULL STORY

'The Daily Show' hires 'SNL' writer Michael Che as correspondent

The Daily Show has hired another correspondent in the wake of John Oliver’s exit.

Saturday Night Live writer and standup comic Michael Che will join the Comedy Central series in June after he finishes his stint at SNL. The hire follows the exit of Oliver, who launched his new HBO talk show, Last Week Tonight, on Sunday. The Daily Show also recently added Jordan Klepper last March.

Che is an NYC standup comic who joined the SNL writing staff last fall. Che started doing standup in 2010, and since then has won New York’s Funniest Stand-Up Competition, appeared on CBS’ Late Show, and was a regular on VH1’s short-lived Best Week Ever reboot. He’s been writing for SNL since 2013.

Here’s Che on Late Show: READ FULL STORY

Sutton Foster, Hilary Duff to star in TV Land comedy from Darren Star

Sutton Foster and Hilary Duff will be joining forces this fall in a TV Land comedy from Sex and The City creator Darren Star. READ FULL STORY

NBC asks viewers for better sitcom ideas

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Got an idea for a sitcom? NBC wants to hear from you.

The broadcast network announced “an unprecedented effort to discover fresh comedic voices” on Tuesday by launching a national campaign offering aspiring comedy writers from around the country the chance to pitch their sitcom ideas.

“We are taking a bold, alternative approach in what we hope will uncover original comedy minds who are looking for a way to get into the television business,” said NBC entertainment president Jennifer Salke. READ FULL STORY

'Last Comic Standing' adds judges Roseanne Barr and Keenen Ivory Wayans; J.B. Smoove to host

Wannabe comedy stars looking to make it big via NBC’s Last Comic Standing are going to have to win over a few icons first.

Roseanne Barr and Keenen Ivory Wayans will serve as celebrity judges on the eighth season of the reality competition, set to premiere May 22 at 9 p.m. ET. International comic superstar Russell Peters will join them at the judges’ table, while J.B. Smoove has been tapped as host. Wanda Sykes will serve as an executive producer on the season’s 13 one-hour episodes.

After a four-year hiatus, Last Comic Standing returns to NBC with a new format, too. The season will open with invitation-only auditions. A pool of 100 comics will be whittled down to 20; those contestants will compete in semifinal rounds. The Top 10 will move into “challenge rounds,” which will test the competitors’ sketch, improv and stand-up skills, as well as their ability to work both alone and in teams.

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