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Tag: Dream Emmy Ballot (1-10 of 16)

Emmy Watch: 'Revenge' creator on the season's best moments

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19. 

Whatever you do, don’t call Revenge a soap opera to creator Mike Kelley. Okay, we’ll call it a smart, addictive, complex, original, hilarious, heartfelt, and yes, occasionally sudsy drama about Emily Thorne’s (Emily VanCamp) return to the Hamptons to take down the family responsible for her father’s death. With a first season full of murder, romance, and fabulous parties aplenty, the highlight had to be the season finale, which wrapped up enough to keep us sated, but left enough questions open to keep us intrigued all summer long. Kelley, who is already writing next season’s scripts (no, he won’t answer anything about Victoria getting off that plane), shared his favorite moments of that episode and the rest of the season.

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Emmy Watch: 'The Middle' boss on turning real-life tragedy into relatable comedy

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

Despite a bevy of critical love in the course of its first three seasons, Emmys have eluded The Middle. Why? We’re not entirely sure. But Eileen Heisler, co-creator of ABC’s quiet comedic gem, has an idea or two. Atop her list? Ironically, the show is sort of stuck in, well, the middle. “We had a line in the beginning of our pilot that was, ‘Yeah, we’re in the middle — the place you fly over on your way to somewhere else,’ and I think that sometimes that happens to our show, too,” she says with a laugh.

The so-called destination, in this case, is of course that other ABC comedy, Modern Family — which, with six Emmy statues, is dripping in award riches. Not that buzz is undeserved; quite the opposite, in fact. If anything, it simply makes it hard to shine, says Heisler. “I think that we’ve always been in the shadow of Modern Family, which we have to be thankful for because it made it a night that gets attention,” she says. “I think there are still some people who are simply not aware of it and not aware that there’s more than one great family show on Wednesday night…But I think there’s also something, maybe, unsexy about [The Middle] and its description — until they watch it. I think there’s always a bit of a bias against something that’s perceived as less hip.”

But the show is edgier than some might think, Heisler says, and relatable. The latter being among the things The Middle does best, which is why Heisler chose “The Map” to take a deep dive into with EW. The episode, in part, dealt with the death of the Hecks’ Aunt Ginny and was a nod to the passing of beloved actress Frances Bay, who portrayed her. See a clip below and read about how the late Bay inspired the episode. READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: Madeleine Stowe looks back at the 'Revenge' finale

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19. 

Thanks to a surge of great roles for women on cable and in broadcast, Supporting Actress in a Drama could end up being the most competitive category when Emmys are handed out Sept. 23 on ABC. With the balloting process beginning June 11, EW asked Madeleine Stowe to reflect on Revenge‘s first season and what episode she would submit if she’s fortunate enough to hear her name read as a nominee next month.

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Emmy Watch: Laura Dern on channeling Lucille Ball in HBO's 'Enlightened'

Photo: Laura Dern in ‘Enlightened.’ Credit: HBO.

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

The first time you see Laura Dern in HBO’s Enlightened, she’s having a full-blown meltdown in the bathroom stall at her office, hurling expletives at her coworkers, storming down the hall toward her least favorite exec, with her mascara streaked down her cheeks, prying open the elevator doors to scream, “I WILL BURY YOU! I WILL KILL YOU! RAGHHHHH!!!” And yet, by the end of the episode, you will have deep sympathy for this woman. This is a huge credit to Dern, who’s funny and cringe inducing and sad and inspiring — sometimes, all at once. (Her character, Amy Jellicoe, is an angry corporate drone who’s sent to anger-management rehab and returns to the office full of bright ideas about how to save the world.) Dern won a Golden Globe for her performance last year, and our critic Ken Tucker’s rooting for her to get an Emmy nod this year. We chatted with Dern about her favorite scene — the opening of the pilot episode. Watch it below, and read our interview with her after the jump. (Warning: the language in the clip below is NSFW.)

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Emmy Watch: Mike White talks about the painfully funny comedy of 'Enlightened'

Photo: Mike White and Laura Dern on the set of ‘Enlightened.’ Credit: Nicola Goode.

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

Before it premiered last fall, many people knew Enlightened as “that HBO show starring Laura Dern and her smeared mascara.” Since then, this moving comedy—which follows corporate whistle-blower Amy Jellicoe (Dern) on her journey from scary, “I will DESTROY you!” meltdown toward Zen-attaining enlightenment—has collected a very devoted group of superfans, including EW’s own Ken Tucker, who put it on his year-end list of the Best TV Shows and called it “beautifully acted, with many stand-out scenes (like, every one in which Dern’s Amy interacted with the dead souls at her company).”

We asked Mike White, who created Enlightened (and also co-stars as Amy’s lonely coworker Tyler), to discuss one of his favorite stand-out scene: the ending of the fourth episode, “Sandy,” which guest stars Robin Wright. We’ll let him explain the background: “Amy has this friend, Sandy, who comes to visit her. Initially, she’s projecting this perfection onto her friend. As the episode goes on, her friend starts to disappoint her, because Amy feels like they’re not on the same page. Then Amy’s paranoid that Sandy is sleeping with Amy’s ex-husband. She’s spun out. Throughout the episode, she really wants to read Sandy’s journal, to see what Sandy thinks of her. At the end, we’re left alone with Sandy, and we look into her journal, and…”

Okay, we won’t spoil it. Watch the scene below, and read our interview with White.

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Emmy Watch: Joel Kinnaman talks breaking promises and acting crazy in 'The Killing'

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19. 

Joel Kinnaman, The Killing
Best Supporting Actor contender
As The Killing‘s Det. Stephen Holder, Joel Kinnaman has been as high as the Space Needle and as low as the depths of the icy Atlantic, emotionally speaking. Despite a viewer-enraging bait-and-switch at the end of the first season, the AMC drama promises to solve the mystery of Rosie Larsen’s murder by the end of Sunday night’s finale. This final stretch “is the resolution,” promises Kinnaman. “All the threads are coming together.”

Holder — a recovering drug addict — has been through the ringer this year, starting with a near-rock-bottom exchange with his nephew Davie (Arien Boey) in this season’s third episode. For the smooth-talking, wisecracking Holder, it was an uncharacteristic moment of vulnerability. Watch the scene below, then find out what it meant to Holder and what it took for Kinnaman (who Ken Tucker says “frequently carried The Killing through its weaker episodes this season) to get him there as an actor. READ FULL STORY

My Dream Emmy Nominations part 5: Best Comedy and Drama Series

dream-emmy-ballotImage Credit: Bob D'Amico/ABC; Ben Leuner/AMC; Patrick Ecclesine/Fox; David M. Russell/CBS; Bill Records/NBCThe fifth and final installment of my Dream Emmy Nominations has arrived and, as you can see, I saved the biggest races for last: best drama and comedy series. Emmy voters, repeat after me: “I promise to transfer these recommendations onto my official ballot when it arrives next week. It may very well be the only thing standing in the way of a Hank sweep come nominations day July 8.” You think I’m kidding about that last bit…okay, I’m kidding. But you get the point. READ FULL STORY

My Dream Emmy Nominations part 4: Best Lead Actor and Actress (drama)

dream-emmy-ballotImage Credit: Prashant Gupta/FX; Justin Stephens/NBC; Mike Muller/FX; Mitchell Haaseth/NBC; Chris Haston/NBCEmmy voters: Welcome to the penultimate installment of my 2010 Dream Emmy Ballot, this one focused on the highly competitive lead actor and actress in a drama series categories. (My picks for outstanding comedy and drama series will be posted tomorrow.) Please consult this list of recommendations when the balloting process begins next week. Otherwise I’m going to be very grumpy when the real nominations come out on July 8. READ FULL STORY

My Dream Emmy Nominations part 3: Best Lead Actor and Actress (comedy)

dream-emmyImage Credit: Mitchell Haaseth/NBC; Martin Segal/Showtime; Adam Larkey/ABC; Mitchell Haaseth/NBC; Paul Drinkwater/NBCHey, Emmy voters, it’s me again! We’re nearing the homestretch. We just have six more categories to get through, including the two below — lead actor and actress in a comedy. (My suggestions for lead actor and actress in a drama will be posted later this afternoon, followed by outstanding comedy series and drama series tomorrow.) To recap: Use this list of recommendations as your guide when the balloting process begins next week. Nods are announced July 8 — don’t let me down! READ FULL STORY

My Dream Emmy Nominations part 2: Best Supporting Actor and Actress (drama)

dream-emmyImage Credit: Justin Stephens/Fox; Bob D'Amico/ABC; Eike Schroter/CBS; NBC; Jaimie Trueblood/HBOTraditionally the toughest categories to narrow down due to the sheer number of potential nominees, this year’s supporting actor and actress in a drama races were made easier for a couple of reasons: Big Love‘s big letdown of a season opened up a bunch of slots, as did the absence of In Treatment. Also, several standout performers (Lily Tomlin for Damages, Walton Goggins for Justified, John Lithgow for Dexter) decided to enter the guest race instead. Having said that, I was still faced with some agonizing dilemmas as I narrowed the field down to a top 12. Emmy voters, you know the drill. Copy and paste my picks when ballots arrive next week. And check back tomorrow for my lead actor/actress picks. READ FULL STORY

My Dream Emmy Nominations part 1: Best Supporting Actor and Actress (comedy)

dream-emmy-ballotImage Credit: Mitchell Haaseth/NBC; Mario Perez/ABC; Mitch Haddad/ABC; Paul Drinkwater/NBC; Patrick Ecclesine/FoxGood news, Emmy voters: Help has arrived. Again.

The arduous process of selecting this year’s nominations begins next week (finalists are announced on July 8), and as has become an annual tradition, I’ve singled out who (and what) I think is most deserving of kudos so you don’t have to. Beginning today and continuing until Friday, I’ll be unveiling my picks in all the major categories. Do me a favor — heck, do us all a favor — and consult these handy cheat sheets when the official ballot drops next week. Pretty please?

First up: Supporting actor and actress in a comedy… READ FULL STORY

Dream Emmy Ballot part 5: Best Comedy and Drama Series

Dreamemmyballot_lThe final installment of my Dream Emmy Ballot has arrived, and, not surprisingly, I saved the biggest races for last: best drama and comedy series. Emmy voters, do me a solid and transfer these recommendations onto your official ballots when they go out next week. It may very well be the only thing standing in the way of a ‘Til Death sweep come nominations day July 16. Oh, and if you missed any of my picks in the acting categories, click here to view the entire ballot.

Best Drama
Big Love (HBO): TV’s most addictive, entertaining, and unpredictable family drama.
Breaking Bad (AMC): You’ve heard of the sophomore-season slump? This is its opposite.
Friday Night Lights (DirecTV/NBC): They shot, they scored their best season since the first. Touchdown!
Mad Men (AMC): I don’t remember anything that happened, but I know it looked and sounded brilliant.
Rescue Me (FX): Bounced back from last season’s creative rut by once again stirring the embers of 9/11.
The Shield (FX): One of the most satisfying (and gut-wrenching) TV swan songs ever.

Best Comedy
30 Rock (NBC): Shaky start, but by the end, we were shaking ourselves — with laughter.
The Big Bang Theory (CBS): I still don’t know what the hell string theory is. But I’m laughing, anyway!
Chuck (NBC): You saved the show. Great. Now how’s about saving it from an Emmy snub?
How I Met Your Mother (CBS): The fact that it’s never been nominated is — wait for it — unacceptable.
The Office (NBC): Splitting the office in two was a swell idea. Bringing Amy Ryan back? Even sweller.
Pushing Daisies (ABC): Good idea, good writing, good directing, good acting, good… bye. [Sigh]

Dream Emmy Ballot Part 1: Best Supporting Actor and Actress (comedy)
Dream Emmy Ballot Part 2: Best Supporting Actor and Actress (drama)
Dream Emmy Ballot Part 3: Best Lead Actor and Actress (comedy)
Dream Emmy Ballot Part 4: Best Lead Actor and Actress (drama)

addCredit(“Leary: FX; Pace: Kate Turning/ABC; Britton: Bill Records/NBC; Cuoco: Clif Lipson/CBS; Paxton: Lacey Terrell/HBO”)

Dream Emmy Ballot part 4: Best Lead Actor and Actress (drama)

Dreamemmyballot_l
Let’s get serious for a moment, Emmy voters. Below you’ll find the penultimate installment of my 2009 Dream Emmy Ballot, this one focused on two of this year’s most competitive categories — lead actor and actress in a drama series. (My suggestions for outstanding comedy and drama series will be posted tomorrow.) Please use this list of recommendations as your own personal cheat sheet when the real balloting process begins next week. Sound good? Cool. Oh, and I will be checking my picks against the official nominations when they come out on July 16. You know, just to see if you copied correctly.

Best Actor (Drama)
•    Gabriel Byrne (In Treatment): He bared his soul as his shrink got shrunk.
•    Kyle Chandler (Friday Night Lights): The series’ heart and soul never punts. Ever.
•    Michael Chiklis (The Shield): He made his character sympathetic right down to his final despicable act. That’s art.
•    Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad): I’m not a fan of reruns, but c’mon, last year’s winner deserves a repeat. 
•    Hugh Laurie (House): He kissed Cuddy, lost Kutner, saw dead people, and got committed. ‘Nuff said.
•    Denis Leary (Rescue Me): Fired up about the show’s creative resurgence? Thank the guy who fanned the flame.

Best Actress (Drama)
•    January Jones (Mad Men): Played the ultimate desperate housewife with remarkable restraint.
•    Regina King (Southland): Her complicated, compassionate cop is the standout in a top-notch ensemble.
•    Jeanne Tripplehorn (Big Love): When her devout character was excommunicated, it was a religious experience for me, too!
•    Glenn Close (Damages): So sharp, she cut clean through a scattered season 2.
•    Evangeline Lilly (Lost): She parted ways with "son" Aaron and delivered the mother of all performances.
•    Elisabeth Moss (Mad Men): Masterfully conveyed the quiet pain of giving up a child.

Dream Emmy Ballot Part 1: Best Supporting Actor and Actress (comedy)
Dream Emmy Ballot Part 2: Best Supporting Actor and Actress (drama)
Dream Emmy Ballot Part 3: Best Lead Actor and Actress (comedy)

addCredit(“Chandler: Bill Records/NBC; Lilly: Art Streiber/ABC; King: Mitchell Haaseth/NBC; Chiklis: Prashant Gupta/FX”)

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