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Tag: Emmy Awards (79-91 of 240)

Emmy Watch: Giancarlo Esposito of 'Breaking Bad' on 'Hermanos' and his unlikely inspiration for Gus

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

He was calm. He was cool. He was always collecting information on his surroundings. Gustavo “Gus” Fring — the pleasant fast-food restaurant owner and upstanding community member who moonlighted as a merciless drug kingpin on AMC’s Breaking Bad — proved to be one of TV’s most intriguing and fearsome villains in recent years. And the actor who played Gus, Giancarlo Esposito, treated viewers to a reign of tranquil terror that [SPOILER ALERT] lasted from the end of season 2 to the conclusion of season 4, when rising meth lord Walter White (Bryan Cranston) felled him with an explosion. But in season 4′s eighth episode, “Hermanos,” we were shown a new (make that old) side of Gus: a somewhat innocent soul who watched in horror as his dear partner, Max (James Martinez), was gunned down in front of — and on — him, the splattered blood staining him forever.

Revisit that long, tense scene below and then read our interview with Esposito, in which he discusses the challenges of pulling off that scene, his unlikely inspiration for Gus, and his next role. READ FULL STORY

Emmy preview: Becky on 'Glee' goes for the gold

It’s not often that a recurring actor has generated enough buzz to warrant an Emmy nod — but Glee’s Lauren Potter may just be the exception.

The 22-year-old actress who plays Sue Sylvester’s sidekick Becky enjoyed not one but two big storylines this season. Her first breakout moment occurred in January’s episode titled “Yes/No,” in which Becky sets her sights on Artie (with heartbreaking results). And in the May episode of “Prom-asaurus,” Puck crowns her queen of the “anti-prom.”

For Potter, however, the winter episode that included the voiceover talents of Helen Mirren as Becky’s alter-ego still tugs at her heart. “It made me cry after I saw the episode,” Potter tells EW. “I wanted to date this typical boy.” That memorable moment could also serve as a big reminder to Emmy voters that co-stars like Chris Colfer and Jane Lynch may not be the only Glee actors who are deserving of Emmy love.

“Oh my God, it would be so exciting,” Potter says of the possibility.

READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: 'Parks and Recreation' EP Michael Schur on 'The Debate,' why Amy Poehler is due

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

In EW.com’s annual Season Finale Awards, readers voted Parks and Recreation‘s season 4 ender the episode most likely to earn someone an Emmy — that person being Amy Poehler. Parks and Recreation exec producer Michael Schur, who thinks there are about a dozen episodes from last season that could do that for Poehler, would obviously love that. “It’s very important to me that people know she’s never won an Emmy before,” Schur says. “I watched this happen with Steve Carell. I think if you ask the average person on the street how many Emmys Steve Carell won for playing Michael Scott, they would probably say, ‘I don’t know. Nine?’ The answer is zero, and it bummed me out deeply. Everyone who worked on that show with Steve feels this way. And now Amy is kinda in this weird similar position where she’s been nominated a bunch of times, and she’s been so good at what she’s done for so long, that I think everybody just assumes she’s been properly rewarded for that and she hasn’t. I hope this is the year that changes.”

Could 2012 also bring the show, which broke into the Best Comedy category last year, its first Emmy as well? Below, Schur takes us inside the episode he hopes voters will revisit. READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: 'Justified' EP Graham Yost talks 'Slaughterhouse' and not repeating yourself

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Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

Last year, FX’s Justified earned four acting Emmy nominations (including one win for supporting actress Margo Martindale). With writing that had us checking in with showrunner Graham Yost each week during season 3, isn’t it time the show break into the Best Drama category? “It would be delightful and we’d be incredibly happy, but I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again, I don’t think the competition in that category has ever been stiffer. I was talking to friends last night, and without breaking a sweat, you can name five shows that should be on that list: Homeland, Game of Thrones, Breaking Bad, Mad Men, The Good Wife. That’s just to start. Boardwalk Empire, on down the line, including us and Sons of Anarchy and a bunch of other things,” Yost says. “They never announce what show was in the sixth spot. Back when Boomtown didn’t get a nomination, I was told by someone at the Academy, ‘You know, we’re not supposed to talk about this, but suffice it to say you didn’t miss by much.’ So that could happen again. I try to be realistic…. For me, the reason you want success is that you get to keep doing the show. To be considered for something like the Emmy, that’s such wonderful icing.”

In our dreams, both Justified and SOA would get nominations. “We would all do a big dance, and [FX president] John Landgraf would lead us in the dance, a big conga line of gratitude,” Yost says. And if just Justified gets a nod, can we make that a Walton Goggins clog number? “I will guarantee you, we will get Walton to do a celebratory clog if we get a nomination.” Goggins, for the record, has promised EW.com the exclusive. But here are more reasons this show deserves its shot at Emmy. READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: 'Sons of Anarchy' EP Paris Barclay talks setting up a season right

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

There have been a few times in Sons of Anarchy EP/director Paris Barclay’s career when he’s known he’s had something special. “Like when David Milch would write a script at NYPD Blue, and I’d go, ‘Wow, this will be fantastic,’ and I’d direct it and he’d win the Emmy and I’d win the Emmy,” Barclay says, laughing. He had the same “wow” feeling when Sons of Anarchy creator Kurt Sutter handed him the script for the season 4 opener, “Out.” “It has not only the brutality that some people associate with Sons, but also some really tender, loving scenes — a wedding, a proposal. It’s a great juxtaposition of the kind of hard action that we do really well and some really deep emotional stuff.”

That juxtaposition was set up by the brilliant end montage of the season opener and defined Sons of Anarchy‘s entire fourth season. We’re hoping this is the year the show finally breaks into the Outstanding Drama category. READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: Katey Sagal talks 'Hands' (and Kurt Sutter's decision to stay silent during Emmy season)

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

Katey Sagal has never been nominated for an Emmy, which becomes more baffling when you add her turn as Gemma Teller, the tough-as-nails old lady to Clay (Ron Perlman) on FX’s Sons of Anarchy, to her long list of credits. In season 4, under the weight of a secret neither of them wanted revealed to Gemma’s son Jax (Charlie Hunnam), their marriage frayed (Perlman’s real-life mother told him his character on Sons had gone too far) and Gemma wanted Clay dead. Here, Sagal takes us inside “Hands,” the episode when the situation came to a head — and blows — after Gemma pieced together Clay’s involvement in the attempted murder of Jax’s fiancée, Tara (Maggie Siff). READ FULL STORY

Daytime Emmy Awards 2012 salute Regis and 'General Hospital'

General Hospital was the biggest winner at the 2012 Daytime Emmy Awards, which aired live from the Beverly Hilton tonight on the HLN channel. The venerable soap pulled in five trophies, including Best Drama and three acting categories. But the night’s most poignant awards went to Regis Philbin, the daytime TV icon who shot his final episode of Live with Regis and Kelly in November after nearly 30 years on the air. That show won for Best Entertainment Talk Show, while Philbin and co-host Kelly Ripa won side-by-side awards for Outstanding Talk Show Host. Check out all of the night’s big winners below. READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: Tina Fey on Liz Lemon as a mom, and her season 7 'bucket list'

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

Tina Fey is the first to admit that 30 Rock hasn’t survived on ratings alone. The series has always relied on the kindness of award voters. It’s been nominated for the Outstanding Comedy Series Emmy every year it’s been eligible, winning three times. 30 Rock and Fey herself have earned so much acclaim that you’d think the novelty of awards would have worn off, especially now that the show is going into its 7th and final season. But Fey tells EW that it hasn’t gotten old. “It’s super fun if you win,” she says. “I mean, it’s super duper fun. Believe me, I wouldn’t be mad if it happened again, but at a certain point, it’s also just avarice.”

Since its premiere, 30 Rock has operated as though every season were its last. “Because we lived in fear, or freedom from fear, of getting canceled for so long, anything weird we wanted to do, we went ahead and did it,” says Fey. Yet season 6 has still found new, weird territory to explore, including a memorably bizarre superhero sequence and another live show. And even crazier, we’ve seen Liz Lemon make real strides toward happy, functional adulthood. Read on as Fey takes us through some of Liz’s most pivotal moments of season 6 and teases what’s in store for season 7. READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: 'Good Wife' star Archie Panjabi talks Kalinda's sexual manipulation, 'Who shot JR?' moment

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Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

The mystery surrounding The Good Wife‘s Kalinda Sharma, a role that has already earned Archie Panjabi two Emmy nominations (including one win), reached a fever pitch in April’s season 3 finale when Kalinda sat herself down in a chair facing the door to her apartment, loaded a gun, and awaited a knock that viewers assume was her estranged husband. “I had phone calls from around the world asking me, ‘WHO IS AT THE DOOR?!’ I said, ‘Pizza delivery,’” Panjabi says, laughing. “It was like a ‘Who shot JR?’ moment. I never anticipated the response to be that great, but obviously, I was really thrilled. People are really excited to see who it is and what he’s going to be like.”

When we chatted with Panjabi earlier this week, she said she still hadn’t heard if Good Wife creators Robert and Michelle King have cast the part, which they’ve said will require a strong, sexy, and intimidating presence. (Panjabi approves of our pick, Idris Elba, but worries the arc would be too long for his movie career, should he even be interested.) “People always say to me, ‘Why is she tough and strong?’ And I say, ‘People are normally like that because they’ve been dealt certain cards in life, and it’s a way of surviving,’” Panjabi says. “I think through her husband, we’ll really get to learn why Kalinda is the way she is: Why she’s so hard and so sexual, why she turned to Peter Florrick [Chris Noth] to get her name changed and escape her past, why she’s so distrustful of people. Something so dreadful must have happened if she wanted to leave the firm and just run. She made the decision to stay and knows that there’s a huge cost but is prepared to take it.” Watch a clip below. Panjabi takes us inside another season 3 scene that showed a new side to Kalinda. READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: John Slattery talks about his 'Mad Men' LSD trip

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

As any Mad Men fan will tell you, any scene with Roger Sterling (John Slattery) has the potential for brilliance or at least a one-liner that you’ll be quoting for the next week. But no episode was more full of stellar Sterling moments than “Far Away Places,” or, as you probably know it, “The LSD Episode.”

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Emmy Watch: 'Fringe' star John Noble on slapping Joshua Jackson

John Noble is scoping out the competition.

The Fringe actor is working his way through his Emmy screeners — a collection of the best television from the past year. He’s usually too busy to watch live, but now, just before Emmy voters narrow an expansive list of talent to just a few names, he’s catching up. “I’ve seen some terrific television the last few weeks just watching the screeners,” he tells EW. “Someone said the other day, ‘It’s a golden age of television.’ And it really could be; there’s some marvelous stuff being made.” Several critics agree: Fringe included.

And as the show heads into its final 13 episodes (something that will happen without co-showrunner Jeff Pinkner, whose exit was announced Tuesday night), Noble is hoping for closure above all. “Fringe is a saga…there needs to be a resolution,” he says. “People are so devoted to Fringe and to wanting this story to be completed. And if we can complete it properly, then it goes into the annals as one of the greatest science fiction stories of all time.”

How that will happen, he’s not sure. What he does know is that “most of next season” will take place in 2036, a world fans first got a glimpse of in the 19th episode of last season, “Letters of Transit.” “Episode 4.19 didn’t just appear,” he says. “We didn’t even know we were picked up then. But what they said was, ‘If we are being picked up, this is where we’re going.’” But most of Noble’s conversation with EW was more focused on where we’ve been with Walter Bishop in the last year. So, we walked through the highlights  in our Emmy Watch deep dive. First, watch a clip of one of his favorite moments:

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Emmy Watch: 'How I Met Your Mother' boss on keeping finale secrets, not being 'above a pity vote'

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

How I Met Your Mother closed its seventh season on the top of its ratings game, ending the broadcast season with a 3.4 rating in the all-important 18-49 demographic, its best stat since the ’08-’09 season. But can ratings success translate into Emmy success? Executive producer Craig Thomas isn’t so sure. “It’s always tricky to speculate on Emmy chances,” he tells EW via e-mail. “We’ve only been nominated for Outstanding Comedy once, for Season 4.  Season seven — this past season — was our highest-rated so far and while I have no idea if that helps our Emmy chances, I’m pretty excited about that fact just by itself!”

Meanwhile, as Mother cruises toward its final years (no word on exactly how many remain), Thomas is also unsure of how the show’s age factors into the Emmy process. “I don’t know if our show’s age helps or hurts.  All I can do is hope that Emmy voters go, ‘Oh crap, HIMYM ain’t gonna be on forever — let’s throw those poor bastards a bone!’” he jokes. “Hey, I never claimed we were above a pity vote.”

Some fans would argue no such consideration is necessary. Creatively, this was a banner year for the show, which in one season revealed Robin’s infertility, showed Lily and Marshall’s journey toward parenthood, saw Barney in two serious relationships (with Nazanin Boniadi and Becki Newton), and reunited Ted with fan favorite Victoria.

But if you ask Thomas, the season’s high note was their first-ever hour-long finale, titled “The Magician’s Code, Part One and Two.” Read on as Thomas takes us behind the scenes of the episode. But first, watch a clip: READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: Aziz Ansari talks Tom's Oh-no-nos list

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

Season 4 of NBC’s Parks and Recreation revealed more about the extravagant taste of Tom Haverford (Aziz Ansari) — both at work, with his doomed business venture Entertainment 720, and at home, with his Diamond Collection bed and breakfast amenities. “It’s always just kinda like, ‘Well, where did he get all this money from to buy all this stuff? It’s never really quite explained,” Ansari says with a laugh. “That’s the fun with all the characters in our show: They’re all very different from what you normally see on TV. They’re weirder than most TV characters, but the more you see into their world, the funnier it is.”

To that end, season 4 also taught us about the things Tom considers potential deal breakers in a relationship. No. 3 on his “Oh-no-nos” list: Not loving ’90s R&B music. He was shocked when Ann (Rashida Jones) didn’t know who Ginuwine is after Donna (Retta) shared that he’s her cousin. Watch a clip below. Ansari takes us inside the scene, which just might help you understand why you and Ann like wannabe playa Tom (even if it’s against your better judgment). READ FULL STORY

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