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Daytime Emmy Awards 2012 salute Regis and 'General Hospital'

General Hospital was the biggest winner at the 2012 Daytime Emmy Awards, which aired live from the Beverly Hilton tonight on the HLN channel. The venerable soap pulled in five trophies, including Best Drama and three acting categories. But the night’s most poignant awards went to Regis Philbin, the daytime TV icon who shot his final episode of Live with Regis and Kelly in November after nearly 30 years on the air. That show won for Best Entertainment Talk Show, while Philbin and co-host Kelly Ripa won side-by-side awards for Outstanding Talk Show Host. Check out all of the night’s big winners below. READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: Tina Fey on Liz Lemon as a mom, and her season 7 'bucket list'

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

Tina Fey is the first to admit that 30 Rock hasn’t survived on ratings alone. The series has always relied on the kindness of award voters. It’s been nominated for the Outstanding Comedy Series Emmy every year it’s been eligible, winning three times. 30 Rock and Fey herself have earned so much acclaim that you’d think the novelty of awards would have worn off, especially now that the show is going into its 7th and final season. But Fey tells EW that it hasn’t gotten old. “It’s super fun if you win,” she says. “I mean, it’s super duper fun. Believe me, I wouldn’t be mad if it happened again, but at a certain point, it’s also just avarice.”

Since its premiere, 30 Rock has operated as though every season were its last. “Because we lived in fear, or freedom from fear, of getting canceled for so long, anything weird we wanted to do, we went ahead and did it,” says Fey. Yet season 6 has still found new, weird territory to explore, including a memorably bizarre superhero sequence and another live show. And even crazier, we’ve seen Liz Lemon make real strides toward happy, functional adulthood. Read on as Fey takes us through some of Liz’s most pivotal moments of season 6 and teases what’s in store for season 7. READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: 'Good Wife' star Archie Panjabi talks Kalinda's sexual manipulation, 'Who shot JR?' moment

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Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

The mystery surrounding The Good Wife‘s Kalinda Sharma, a role that has already earned Archie Panjabi two Emmy nominations (including one win), reached a fever pitch in April’s season 3 finale when Kalinda sat herself down in a chair facing the door to her apartment, loaded a gun, and awaited a knock that viewers assume was her estranged husband. “I had phone calls from around the world asking me, ‘WHO IS AT THE DOOR?!’ I said, ‘Pizza delivery,'” Panjabi says, laughing. “It was like a ‘Who shot JR?’ moment. I never anticipated the response to be that great, but obviously, I was really thrilled. People are really excited to see who it is and what he’s going to be like.”

When we chatted with Panjabi earlier this week, she said she still hadn’t heard if Good Wife creators Robert and Michelle King have cast the part, which they’ve said will require a strong, sexy, and intimidating presence. (Panjabi approves of our pick, Idris Elba, but worries the arc would be too long for his movie career, should he even be interested.) “People always say to me, ‘Why is she tough and strong?’ And I say, ‘People are normally like that because they’ve been dealt certain cards in life, and it’s a way of surviving,'” Panjabi says. “I think through her husband, we’ll really get to learn why Kalinda is the way she is: Why she’s so hard and so sexual, why she turned to Peter Florrick [Chris Noth] to get her name changed and escape her past, why she’s so distrustful of people. Something so dreadful must have happened if she wanted to leave the firm and just run. She made the decision to stay and knows that there’s a huge cost but is prepared to take it.” Watch a clip below. Panjabi takes us inside another season 3 scene that showed a new side to Kalinda. READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: John Slattery talks about his 'Mad Men' LSD trip

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

As any Mad Men fan will tell you, any scene with Roger Sterling (John Slattery) has the potential for brilliance or at least a one-liner that you’ll be quoting for the next week. But no episode was more full of stellar Sterling moments than “Far Away Places,” or, as you probably know it, “The LSD Episode.”

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Emmy Watch: 'Fringe' star John Noble on slapping Joshua Jackson

John Noble is scoping out the competition.

The Fringe actor is working his way through his Emmy screeners — a collection of the best television from the past year. He’s usually too busy to watch live, but now, just before Emmy voters narrow an expansive list of talent to just a few names, he’s catching up. “I’ve seen some terrific television the last few weeks just watching the screeners,” he tells EW. “Someone said the other day, ‘It’s a golden age of television.’ And it really could be; there’s some marvelous stuff being made.” Several critics agree: Fringe included.

And as the show heads into its final 13 episodes (something that will happen without co-showrunner Jeff Pinkner, whose exit was announced Tuesday night), Noble is hoping for closure above all. “Fringe is a saga…there needs to be a resolution,” he says. “People are so devoted to Fringe and to wanting this story to be completed. And if we can complete it properly, then it goes into the annals as one of the greatest science fiction stories of all time.”

How that will happen, he’s not sure. What he does know is that “most of next season” will take place in 2036, a world fans first got a glimpse of in the 19th episode of last season, “Letters of Transit.” “Episode 4.19 didn’t just appear,” he says. “We didn’t even know we were picked up then. But what they said was, ‘If we are being picked up, this is where we’re going.'” But most of Noble’s conversation with EW was more focused on where we’ve been with Walter Bishop in the last year. So, we walked through the highlights  in our Emmy Watch deep dive. First, watch a clip of one of his favorite moments:

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Emmy Watch: 'How I Met Your Mother' boss on keeping finale secrets, not being 'above a pity vote'

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

How I Met Your Mother closed its seventh season on the top of its ratings game, ending the broadcast season with a 3.4 rating in the all-important 18-49 demographic, its best stat since the ’08-’09 season. But can ratings success translate into Emmy success? Executive producer Craig Thomas isn’t so sure. “It’s always tricky to speculate on Emmy chances,” he tells EW via e-mail. “We’ve only been nominated for Outstanding Comedy once, for Season 4.  Season seven — this past season — was our highest-rated so far and while I have no idea if that helps our Emmy chances, I’m pretty excited about that fact just by itself!”

Meanwhile, as Mother cruises toward its final years (no word on exactly how many remain), Thomas is also unsure of how the show’s age factors into the Emmy process. “I don’t know if our show’s age helps or hurts.  All I can do is hope that Emmy voters go, ‘Oh crap, HIMYM ain’t gonna be on forever — let’s throw those poor bastards a bone!'” he jokes. “Hey, I never claimed we were above a pity vote.”

Some fans would argue no such consideration is necessary. Creatively, this was a banner year for the show, which in one season revealed Robin’s infertility, showed Lily and Marshall’s journey toward parenthood, saw Barney in two serious relationships (with Nazanin Boniadi and Becki Newton), and reunited Ted with fan favorite Victoria.

But if you ask Thomas, the season’s high note was their first-ever hour-long finale, titled “The Magician’s Code, Part One and Two.” Read on as Thomas takes us behind the scenes of the episode. But first, watch a clip: READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: Aziz Ansari talks Tom's Oh-no-nos list

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

Season 4 of NBC’s Parks and Recreation revealed more about the extravagant taste of Tom Haverford (Aziz Ansari) — both at work, with his doomed business venture Entertainment 720, and at home, with his Diamond Collection bed and breakfast amenities. “It’s always just kinda like, ‘Well, where did he get all this money from to buy all this stuff? It’s never really quite explained,” Ansari says with a laugh. “That’s the fun with all the characters in our show: They’re all very different from what you normally see on TV. They’re weirder than most TV characters, but the more you see into their world, the funnier it is.”

To that end, season 4 also taught us about the things Tom considers potential deal breakers in a relationship. No. 3 on his “Oh-no-nos” list: Not loving ’90s R&B music. He was shocked when Ann (Rashida Jones) didn’t know who Ginuwine is after Donna (Retta) shared that he’s her cousin. Watch a clip below. Ansari takes us inside the scene, which just might help you understand why you and Ann like wannabe playa Tom (even if it’s against your better judgment). READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: 'Revenge' creator on the season's best moments

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19. 

Whatever you do, don’t call Revenge a soap opera to creator Mike Kelley. Okay, we’ll call it a smart, addictive, complex, original, hilarious, heartfelt, and yes, occasionally sudsy drama about Emily Thorne’s (Emily VanCamp) return to the Hamptons to take down the family responsible for her father’s death. With a first season full of murder, romance, and fabulous parties aplenty, the highlight had to be the season finale, which wrapped up enough to keep us sated, but left enough questions open to keep us intrigued all summer long. Kelley, who is already writing next season’s scripts (no, he won’t answer anything about Victoria getting off that plane), shared his favorite moments of that episode and the rest of the season.

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Emmy Watch: 'Happy Endings' EPs reveal Mandonna was almost Sex Pants None the Richer

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

There’s a moment in Happy Endings‘ season 2 finale, “Four Weddings and a Funeral (Minus Three Weddings and a Funeral),” in which guest star Stephen Guarino (as groom Derrick) tells the show’s regulars he doesn’t have time for their endless bantering: “The back and forth, it’s exhausting. I don’t even know what you’re saying half the time. So slow down!” As a fan of Arrested Development, 30 Rock, and Aaron Sorkin, creator David Caspe admits he’s preconditioned to enjoying a fast-paced show. (Exec producer Jonathan Groff says EP/director Joe Russo even told the cast — Casey Wilson, Damon Wayans Jr., Adam Pally, Zachary Knighton, Elisha Cuthbert, and Eliza Coupe — to go see The Social Network as they began work on the series.) But Caspe can think of two other reasons for its rapid-fire dialogue, which he’s been told some fans have to rewind to catch: The show’s writers find the six characters so funny, they want them all to get jokes in every episode and pen scripts that are too long, and his own insecurity.

“A window into my troubled soul is I tend to think well, f—, if we just keep throwin’ them at ‘em, they won’t have any time to hate any of them,” Caspe says, with a laugh. “In my opinion, it kinda takes the pressure off the jokes. If you didn’t like this one, maybe this one! It’s sorta my desperate attempt to be liked. I sometimes watch the show and feel like it’s just me screaming out ‘Love me! Love me! Love me! Love me! Love me!”

Here, Caspe and Groff take us inside the ABC comedy’s season finale and tease what’s to come.

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Emmy Watch: 'The Middle' boss on turning real-life tragedy into relatable comedy

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

Despite a bevy of critical love in the course of its first three seasons, Emmys have eluded The Middle. Why? We’re not entirely sure. But Eileen Heisler, co-creator of ABC’s quiet comedic gem, has an idea or two. Atop her list? Ironically, the show is sort of stuck in, well, the middle. “We had a line in the beginning of our pilot that was, ‘Yeah, we’re in the middle — the place you fly over on your way to somewhere else,’ and I think that sometimes that happens to our show, too,” she says with a laugh.

The so-called destination, in this case, is of course that other ABC comedy, Modern Family — which, with six Emmy statues, is dripping in award riches. Not that buzz is undeserved; quite the opposite, in fact. If anything, it simply makes it hard to shine, says Heisler. “I think that we’ve always been in the shadow of Modern Family, which we have to be thankful for because it made it a night that gets attention,” she says. “I think there are still some people who are simply not aware of it and not aware that there’s more than one great family show on Wednesday night…But I think there’s also something, maybe, unsexy about [The Middle] and its description — until they watch it. I think there’s always a bit of a bias against something that’s perceived as less hip.”

But the show is edgier than some might think, Heisler says, and relatable. The latter being among the things The Middle does best, which is why Heisler chose “The Map” to take a deep dive into with EW. The episode, in part, dealt with the death of the Hecks’ Aunt Ginny and was a nod to the passing of beloved actress Frances Bay, who portrayed her. See a clip below and read about how the late Bay inspired the episode. READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: Madeleine Stowe looks back at the 'Revenge' finale

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19. 

Thanks to a surge of great roles for women on cable and in broadcast, Supporting Actress in a Drama could end up being the most competitive category when Emmys are handed out Sept. 23 on ABC. With the balloting process beginning June 11, EW asked Madeleine Stowe to reflect on Revenge‘s first season and what episode she would submit if she’s fortunate enough to hear her name read as a nominee next month.

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Emmy Watch: Nick Offerman talks the toughest thing he's had to do as Ron Swanson

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

Four seasons into NBC’s Parks and Recreation, Nick Offerman has turned burly libertarian Ron Swanson into one of TV’s most well-defined characters. It’s impossible to read the Swanson Pyramid of Greatness and not hear his voice in your head, which makes it easy to take Offerman’s deadpan performance for granted. Perhaps that’s why we’re hoping Emmy voters revisit the September 2011 episode “Ron and Tammys,” in which Ron’s first ex-wife, Tammy 1 (guest star Patricia Clarkson), turns him into the anti-Ron Swanson (a “neutered wimp,” to borrow Leslie Knope’s words). Watch a clip below. Offerman reflects on his transformation.  READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: 'Modern Family' co-creator talks about surprise finale

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Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to return nomination ballots, EW.com is running a series called Emmy Watch, featuring highlight clips and interviews with actors, producers, and writers whom EW TV critic Ken Tucker has on his wish list for the nominations announcement on July 19.

Steve Levitan, the co-creator of the Emmy-winning Modern Family, talked to EW about Gloria’s surprise pregnancy in the finale, and why he opted to expand her family with Jay rather than another little one to the Cameron-Mitchell household.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY Should Modern Family receive another nomination in the Outstanding Comedy, what episodes will you submit?

STEVE LEVITAN After much debate, we decided “Aunt Mommy,” “Baby on Board,” “Door to Door,” “Punkin Chunkin,” and “Leap Day.”

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