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Tag: Emmy Watch (1-10 of 60)

Emmy Watch: Tatiana Maslany shows many shades in 'Orphan Black'

Leading up to today’s deadline for Emmy voters to submit nomination ballots, EW.com is featuring interviews with some of the actors and actresses whose names we hope to hear when nominations are announced on July 18.

Could BBC America’s addictive new drama Orphan Black hold the flag for classic sci-fi when Emmy nominations roll around? Tatiana Maslany, the show’s captivating and chameleon-like star, sure hopes they can.

“It would be so amazing if the show got nominated or we got out there; I think people would be really excited about that because so many incredible sci-fi-shows go under the radar and don’t get taken seriously in award season,” she says. “But I think sci-fi definitely belongs there because it tells sort of subversive stories about society without hitting you over the head. It puts very real stories into the context of a fantastical world, so there’s a sense of escapism but there’s also a sense of, ‘This isn’t far from our reality.’”

Reality has just started to set in for the newcomer, who has burst onto the scene to become a dark horse contender for a nomination this Emmy season. In a Q&A with EW, she talks about the show’s success and some of her most challenging scenes. And with seven different roles, she had plenty to choose from!

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Emmy Watch: Vera Farmiga on playing a 'Psycho' mother for 'Bates Motel'

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to submit nomination ballots, EW.com will feature interviews with some of the actors and actresses whose names we hope to hear when nominations are announced on July 18.

We all know that Psycho’s Norman Bates had mother issues. But now we know why thanks to Vera Farmiga’s full-bodied performance as mama Norma on Bates Motel, A&E’s reboot of the famous Hitchcock thriller. Desperately clinging to her son like a manic depressive lioness, Farmiga portrays both a formidable heroine and an unstable mess.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: You have a very successful film career — why take on a TV series?
VERA FARMIGA: I’m not trying out TV, I think my career was born out of TV way back with [Fox’s 1997 series] Roar and my first prominent job, my first big paycheck, or real paycheck rather, the start of my career was Roar. I supposed there are very few things on my don’t list: Don’t eat poisonous mushrooms, don’t do my own taxes, and I guess TV just wasn’t on my don’t list. And culturally, as well, things have shifted. For me then what I gravitate toward is character and challenge and I’m quite honestly wasn’t feeling challenged in a long time in this way, in this capacity. So man, I jumped at the opportunity.
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Emmy Watch: Monica Potter on Kristina's tough year on 'Parenthood'

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to submit nomination ballots, EW.com will feature interviews with some of the actors and actresses whose names we hope to hear when nominations are announced on July 18.

Monica Potter brought TV viewers to tears every week this season on Parenthood as super-mom Kristina Braverman battled breast cancer that nearly took her life.

We’ve said it once, twice and 10 times over: Potter gave a performance that’s worth its weight in Emmy gold. So it’s only fitting that we hopped on the phone with her as part of our continued coverage leading up to nominations to dissect all those gut-wrenching scenes.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: You were really the center of the storm this season. And I know you had your own personal breast cancer scare and Jason Katims’ wife is a survivor. What surprised you about how the whole story line was approached?
POTTER: You know, I feel like we didn’t talk about it too much. I don’t think I talked to Kathy — maybe just once about it. We just came in every day and tackled the scenes and let it happen naturally. That, to me, was such a learning experience because I don’t normally do that with the show — or anything I do. I’m always on it too much. I’m trying to figure out what’s going to happen next and analyzing things, and this year, I didn’t do that at all. We just sort of let things happen as we went along. And for me, it was the best way to approach it.
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Emmy Watch: Sarah Burns discusses that extremely awkward hospital visit in 'Enlightened'

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to submit nomination ballots, EW.com will feature interviews with some of the actors and actresses whose names we hope to hear when nominations are announced on July 18.

Krista was in an impossible position from the beginning. As Amy Jellicoe was burning out in a spectacular fashion at Abbadon, her assistant Krista was actually given an opportunity: with her old boss gone, she could rise in the corporate ranks. When Amy returns after an extended leave, she finds Krista thriving. She’s pregnant. She’s happy. She’s successful. And she’s occupying Amy’s old office. It was always going to be awkward.

Creator and writer Mike White allowed his show to luxuriate in complexity, and Krista is never reduced to just one thing. Actress Sarah Burns created an empathetic character who is fundamentally conflicted about her relationship with Amy. Even though we may have experienced most things in Enlightened through the vehicle of Amy, we’re never blinded by her, and can see the always earnest and sometimes tone-deaf strain that she manages to put on others. On one level, Krista is just kind of trying to lead her own life and deal with Amy’s intermittent, terribly self-centered, interruptions as they come.

EW spoke with Burns about her character, knowing what it feels like to outgrow a boss, and Enlightened’s bittersweet ending.

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Emmy Watch: Elisabeth Moss has blood on her hands in 'Top of the Lake'

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to submit nomination ballots, EW.com will feature interviews with some of the actors and actresses whose names we hope to hear when nominations are announced on July 18.

Increasingly there’s the sense that Elisabeth Moss can do anything. After six seasons of playing such a marvelous character like Peggy Olson on Mad Men, some actresses would have a hard time ever sliding out of such a comfortable wheelhouse. But this spring Moss, 30, reinvented herself in Jane Campion’s dark and moody miniseries masterpiece Top of the Lake.

As detective Robin Griffin, driven wild to solve the mystery of a missing pregnant 12-year-old girl, Moss was a churning ball of opposing forces. She was brittle (“You can be very hard,” Robin’s mother warned her at one point, “and what I don’t like is, you think it’s strength.”) and vulnerable and deeply wounded and weary and magnificently capable and a total mess. She was at once the youngest and oldest person in the room. She seemed always dangerous of both cracking open and throwing down, a tricky combination she nailed in a blistering scene in episode 4 when she attacks her childhood rapist in a bar. She is magnificent, boiling with feeling, and it’s pleasure to talk about a performance outside of her Mad Men‘s walls that’s worthy of Emmy consideration. READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: Michael Cudlitz on being handcuffed in his underwear for 'Southland'

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to submit nomination ballots, EW.com will feature interviews with some of the actors and actresses whose names we hope to hear when nominations are announced on July 18.

On TNT’s Southland, Michael Cudlitz and an ensemble cast delivered some of the most consistently raw and lauded performances on television. And if nothing else, he’s proud that the show, which was canceled in May, leaves behind that legacy.

“Some shows just go away — and that’s fine. They serve their purpose and their entertainment value, but there are shows that touch people in different ways and that they remember. I think this is definitely one of them,” he says. “It’s definitely a character I will never forget.”

And after last season, it’s easy to understand why. In a Q&A with EW, the actor, who many consider in the running for an Emmy nomination, relives John Cooper’s most compelling moments from the last year.
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Emmy Watch: Sigourney Weaver on getting Presidential on 'Political Animals'

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to submit nomination ballots, EW.com will feature interviews with some of the actors and actresses whose names we hope to hear when nominations are announced on July 18.

Last summer, the brilliant Sigourney Weaver made her series TV debut on USA’s Political Animals as Elaine Barrish, the current Secretary of State. Barrish not only had to deal with DC politics but an ex-husband who was also the former President (Ciaran Hinds), two troubled sons (James Wolk and Sebastian Stan), a snooping reporter (Carla Gugino) and a boozy mother (Ellen Burstyn). Weaver gave an award-worthy performance as a woman trying to balance her own ambition with the needs of her family.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: This was your first time doing a lead role on an hour-long drama. What was that like?
SIGOURNEY WEAVER: I thought it was really exciting. Very challenging. I loved the role. I loved the ensemble. I loved working with Greg Berlanti. I had never done this kind of thing before and it was very exciting material. Of course somedays one wished one had more time but I think everyone was so good and on the ball that we really tried to go in there and squeeze everything out of it. I have even more respect for people, for instance Breaking Bad. I read about their schedule because I think Bryan Cranston is in everything!
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Emmy Watch: Parker Posey on channeling Ruth Gordon in 'Louie'

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to submit nomination ballots, EW.com will feature interviews with some of the actors and actresses whose names we hope to hear when nominations are announced on July 18.

Parker Posey has played her share of whimsical characters. So when Louie first met Liz — with her bangs and braids and vintage looking dress and bookstore job — it was tempting to assume that she would fall into the manic pixie dream girl bucket and exist only to bring Louie out of his slump with her quirky ways and optimistic outlook.

But this is Louis C.K. He was never going waste our time with a bland superficial “type” fit for an Apple commercial. In her four-episode arc on FX’s Louie, Posey used her arsenal of talent and the material written and directed by C.K. to bring Liz to life and subvert the expectations of audiences who expect the cute girl in the bookstore to be a certain way, especially on television shows.

EW got the chance to speak with Posey about her theories on Liz and the brilliance of Louis C.K.

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Emmy Watch: 'Rectify' star Abigail Spencer on the importance of chemistry (and nail polish)

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to submit nomination ballots, EW.com will feature interviews with some of the actors and actresses whose names we hope to hear when nominations are announced on July 18.

When you first see Abigail Spencer on screen in Sundance’s strong miniseries Rectify, she’s a chain-smoking ball of nervous energy. Over the course of the six-parter, her character, Amantha, becomes the foil to her brother Daniel (Aden Young), who went from death row to freedom. As he is quiet and still, she’s electric, right down to the you-can’t-tame-me mane of hers. READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: Adam Scott on Ben and Leslie's wedding: 'It wasn't just a day at work'

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to submit nomination ballots, EW.com will feature interviews with some of the actors and actresses whose names we hope to hear when nominations are announced on July 18.

Fans and critics will often agree that season 5 of Parks and Recreation was one of — if not the — best of the series. But standing out in the pool of awesome is Adam Scott, who plays Ben Wyatt, the lovably geeky Game of Thrones enthusiast who in a few seasons has won the hearts of Leslie Knope and audiences alike.

But why, after nearly three seasons on the show, has Scott, 40, entered the possible running for an Emmy nomination more than ever? We have some ideas, but Scott hesitates to offer his own theories. “I can’t answer to that specifically because, 1) I’d sound like a boob,” he deadpans. “Also, because I’m not really sure. But the season itself to me was special.”

Below, in a Q&A with EW, Scott relives the standout season.
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Emmy Watch: Jimmy Smits talks Nero's dark turn on 'Sons of Anarchy'

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to submit nomination ballots, EW.com will feature interviews with some of the actors and actresses whose names we hope to hear when nominations are announced on July 18.

Sons of Anarchy has never earned an acting Emmy nomination, but with a dozen career nods to his credit, including one win for L.A. Law, and a character as layered as sensitive ex-addict/OG gangster Nero Padilla, Jimmy Smits might be the man to change that. After meeting Smits at a Directors Guild of America function honoring Paris Barclay, an executive producer and director of Sons of Anarchy with whom Smits feels he did some of his best work at the end of his NYPD Blue run, SOA creator Kurt Sutter began talks for Smits to join the FX drama’s fifth season as the escort service-operating “companionator.”

“I was in Las Vegas the other day introducing [Vice President Joe] Biden at this function, and he comes walking in, and there’s this long receiving line, and he clocks me at the end of the line — because I’m the tallest, I always go to the end — and he says, ‘Smits, you’re breaking my heart. You go from a politician, to a policeman, to a judge, to now you’re with these guys,’” Smits tells EW, laughing at the ribbing. Here, we asked Smits to talk about the episode (“To Thine Own Self”) in which nice-guy Nero, who wanted to leave the life behind him, was sucked back in.

And yes, Barclay directed it.
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Emmy Watch: 'Nashville' star Hayden Panettiere on the hardest scene she's ever shot

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to submit nomination ballots, EW.com will feature interviews with some of the actors and actresses whose names we hope to hear when nominations are announced on July 18.

Who would have thought that country-pop starlet Juliette Barnes (Hayden Panettiere) would end Nashville‘s first season as the character in the healthiest place — even as she’s mourning her recovering addict mother, who’d just committed murder-suicide to save Juliette from another scandal? Even more surprising: Originally, Juliette wasn’t going to be as large a role as she’s become. “I found this out on Heroes: Especially when you do ensemble casts, you can try as hard as you want to tell the audience how to feel, what character or story line they like the most, but they will always choose. Everybody loves to hate one of the characters,” Panettiere says, with a laugh. “But Callie [Khouri] and the writers created this character that you still had sympathy for, and empathy. I would never want to play the villain who didn’t have heart, who didn’t have something to back it up.” Here, we ask Panettiere to break down the emotional season finale. READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: 'House of Cards' star Corey Stoll on pretending to be 'as drunk as I could possibly be'

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to submit nomination ballots, EW.com will feature interviews with some of the actors and actresses whose names we hope to hear when nominations are announced on July 18.

It’s been almost five months since the Great House of Cards Binge Watch of 2013, but Corey Stoll, who played alcoholic Congressman Peter Russo, isn’t worried about the show — or its compelling characters — being forgotten.

“I don’t feel like a TV show has to be a constant companion to somebody to have resonance in their life,” he says of the series’ unique approach to distribution and the flare-and-fade online discussion that followed. “That’s how I watch TV. There are maybe a few things I watch in real time, but for the most part, I watch in chunks. I think The Wire will remain with me even though I watched it all very quickly.”

As Emmy season continues in full force, EW spoke with Stoll about his journey in the shoes of his complicated — and, ultimately, tragic — character.
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