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Tag: Emmys (14-26 of 50)

'Fargo' star Allison Tolman reacts to her first Emmy nomination

Fargo scene-stealer Allison Tolman was the heart—and brains—of FX’s movie-to-TV adaptation. Playing dogged deputy police officer Molly Solverson was Tolman’s first major acting role—and now it’s her first Emmy-nominated role. The 32-year-old is in the running for best supporting actress in a miniseries or movie. Spoiler alert: She’s pretty stoked about the nod.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Congrats! Were you awake when the nominations were announced? How did you find out you’ve been shortlisted?
ALLISON TOLMAN: Thank you! It’s awesome that the show is so well-represented in so many categories. I was awake; I didn’t have to wake up much earlier than usual. I was awake and logged in with my cat in my lap. I’m at home in Chicago right now, so it was nice to be able to be home while I got this news, and be in a familiar place with familiar surroundings. READ FULL STORY

Anna Chlumsky reacts to her Emmy nom, reveals which 'Veep' scene was an accident

Veep‘s Amy had a roller coaster of a year, what with losing (and then winning) the role of Selina’s campaign manager—but for the actress that plays her, things are looking up. We caught up with Chlumsky, nominated for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy for the second year in a row, right after she found out about her nod.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Congratulations!
ANNA CHLUMSKY: Thank you very much!

Where were you when you found out this morning?
I was actually about to take a little morning nap, because I had already been up for a few hours with my daughter. I was like, “Oh, do I do yoga, or do I nap, or do I do both?” And so I was planning on doing both, and really, I was just about to put my head on the pillow and then my phone rang.

So now you don’t get to nap, but do you get to do yoga?
I will tonight after rehearsal. This is worth it. [Laughs] READ FULL STORY

Lizzy Caplan talks 'Masters of Sex' Emmy nod, her love for 'Real Housewives'

Lizzy Caplan prepared for today’s Emmys announcement like anyone would: by reading her horoscope. Which didn’t give her the most hope. “They were all bad!” Caplan told EW. “And then I just started laughing and realized, I really need to get a life.”

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'Orange Is the New Black' star Uzo Aduba reacts to her first Emmy nomination

When the 2014 Emmy nominations were announced Thursday morning, Uzo Aduba was sitting in traffic. But after a phone call from her rep, the Orange is the New Black star realized that she had just earned her first ever Emmy nomination for her work as Suzanne “Crazy Eyes” Warren in the show’s first season. EW caught up with Aduba right after she got the news.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: First of all, congratulations!
UZO ADUBA: Oh my goodness, thank you so much!

So where were you when you found out this morning?
I was in traffic. [Laughs] I was in traffic and, true story, I just happened to look down and see my phone ringing and I was like, “Oh it’s my publicist, let me pick up the phone.” I don’t know how long it was ringing because my ear buds were in, and I picked it up, and she and my manager told me. I was like, “Are you kidding?” I couldn’t stop saying, “Are you joking?” And they were like, “We would not joke about this.” READ FULL STORY

2014 Emmys: Jimmy Fallon, Mayim Bialik, other nominees react

It’s still near the crack of dawn on the west coast—but reactions from newly-minted nominees for this year’s 66th Annual Primetime Emmys have already begun to roll in. Here’s a partial list of tweets and statements; we’ll update it constantly throughout the day as more nominees react. (And keep an eye out for EW’s individual nominee interviews as well.)

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2014 Primetime Emmys: And the nominees are...

UPDATE: Here are the nominees in the ceremony’s biggest categories. Game of Thrones is this year’s most nominated program, with 19 nods total; close behind it are Fargo and American Horror Story: Coven, which received 18 and 17 nominations respectively. HBO, naturally, reigns as the most nominated network with 99 total nods; behind it is CBS with 47 noms, NBC with 46, and FX with 45. READ FULL STORY

The 50 Best TV Scenes of the Past Year

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Now that the TV season is over, awards season is about to begin. We’ve watched every minute of every episode of the finest shows from the past year to determine the most impressive scene from each series. It was a task as daunting as it was time-consuming (you try to pick just one “best” scene from Breaking Bad, or Game of Thrones), but we came away with our list, and we’re ready for you to disagree with the majority of it.

The clips, and our explanations, are below. Emmy voters, you’ll want to take notes.

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Emmy Watch: 'Sleepy Hollow' EP Alex Kurtzman on the epic reveal

Spoiler alert! If you intend to marathon Sleepy Hollow‘s first season before its fall return, stop reading now. Seriously. The finale’s closing nine minutes, which revealed one of the TV season’s most shocking twists, also made Entertainment Weekly‘s list of the season’s 50 Best Scenes, which can be found in the issue on stands now. We spoke to exec producer Alex Kurtzman about the brilliance of John Noble and hiding a major reveal in plain sight. READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: Maggie Siff talks Tara's park confrontation on 'Sons of Anarchy'

We said it in our recap of Sons of Anarchy‘s season 6 finale, and now we’ll say it again: Every year, EW advocates for Maggie Siff to get an Emmy nomination. We hope this past season’s scene in the park — when Tara is convinced Jax (Charlie Hunnam) is going to kill her, but instead, he decides to set her and their boys free — will finally cinch her one. Here, Siff — a new mom who imagines she’ll “start sniffing around again in the fall” for her next role — talks about that scene, which was named one of the TV season’s 50 Best in the issue of Entertainment Weekly on stands now. READ FULL STORY

HBO: Why 'Game of Thrones' gets robbed at Emmys

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When it comes to the industry’s biggest awards, Game of Thrones is almost always the bridesmaid. The HBO fantasy hit has racked up a hugely impressive 42 prime-time Emmy and Golden Globe nominations across its first three seasons. It’s also won 11 of those awards, mainly for categories like visual effects, make-up, costumes and sound effects. Yet in the major categories — best series, acting, writing and directing — Thrones has taken home just two statues (a Globe and Emmy for Peter Dinklage as best supporting actor).

What gives?

We asked HBO’s programming president Michael Lombardo about this topic during a Thrones interview, and he suggested the show’s fantasy setting and high production values might distract from the talent on display. READ FULL STORY

'Unfair' HBO knocked for 'True Detective' Emmy bid

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FX chief John Landgraf accused HBO, Showtime and Netflix of engaging in “unfair” Emmy submission practices by stretching the definitions of popular categories to score more award-season gold.

First Landgraf told reporters at his network’s upfront presentation to advertisers in New York on Wednesday that submitting True Detective as a drama was an “unfair” move, both because of the show’s stand-alone format and because networks are able to draw outsized A-list talent like Matthew McConaughey with the promise of single-season deals. “My own personal point of view is that a miniseries is a story that ends, a series is a story that continues,” Landgraf said. “To tell you the truth, I think it’s actually unfair for HBO to put True Detective in the drama series category because essentially you can get certain actors to do a closed-ended series — a la Billy Bob Thornton in Fargo or Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson in True Detective — who you can’t get to sign on for a seven-year [regular drama series] deal.”

The Wrap reported these initial comments, then Landgraf spoke to EW by phone to elaborate. The executive called the issue a “respectful debate” with his cable rivals. “It doesn’t make sense to put actors who signed on to do one year and perform the beginning, middle, and end of a character against those who are only showing one-fifth or one-sixth of that character’s journey in a season,” he said. “Matthew McConaughey is doing work every bit as good as [FX's Americans star] Matthew Rhys, but he’ll be competing against like one-sixth of the other actor’s performance. It doesn’t strike me as particularly fair. And I can see the entire series category eventually stacked with movie actors who signed on for one series of a show.” READ FULL STORY

Emmys: HBO's 'True Detective' will compete as a drama series

HBO’s critically acclaimed crime series True Detective will compete under the drama category, rather than miniseries, at this year’s Emmys, EW confirmed.

The eight-episode limited series, starring Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson, could have easily fit under the miniseries category, but will now be entering a more crowded contest, potentially competing against such hits as AMC’s Breaking Bad and Mad Men, Showtime’s Homeland, and HBO’s own Game of Thrones, among others.

The American Horror Story franchise made the opposite move in 2012 when it switched from drama to miniseries, which had positive results, garnering the series numerous nominations.

Earlier Tuesday, Showtime also made a shift announcing that its series Shameless would switch to the comedy  category after being submitted as a drama for the past three seasons.

'Shameless' switches Emmy categories: It's a comedy now

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Shameless is changing teams. The Showtime series will compete as a comedy in this year’s Emmy Awards after being submitted as a drama the past three seasons.

Shameless has typically been described as a dramedy and has received three Emmy noms for actors on the show (though not for its star, William H. Macy). The move follows a similar decision made by Netflix, which originally intended to submit the freshman season of Orange is the New Black as a drama series, then last fall decided to submit it as a comedy instead.

Last year the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences nominated ABC’s Modern Family — which won — along with FX’s Louie, HBO’s Girls, CBS’ Big Bang Theory, NBC’s 30 Rock and HBO’s Veep. Of those, 30 Rock is not eligible this year having concluded last season. That potentially opens up at least one slot, though Fox freshman comedy and Golden Globe winner Brooklyn Nine-Nine could also be a contender.

While on the drama side, competition is fierce. The final seasons of AMC’s Breaking Bad (whose final eight episodes from last summer are eligible) and Mad Men (whose upcoming first half of its final season is eligible) are going to be tough to beat, plus there’s HBO’s chronic bridesmaid Game of Thrones, along with Showtime’s Homeland and others to worry about.

Shameless fans, you decide: Is this show a comedy or a drama?

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