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Tag: Emmys (53-65 of 81)

Emmy Watch: Maggie Siff talks Tara's park confrontation on 'Sons of Anarchy'

We said it in our recap of Sons of Anarchy‘s season 6 finale, and now we’ll say it again: Every year, EW advocates for Maggie Siff to get an Emmy nomination. We hope this past season’s scene in the park — when Tara is convinced Jax (Charlie Hunnam) is going to kill her, but instead, he decides to set her and their boys free — will finally cinch her one. Here, Siff — a new mom who imagines she’ll “start sniffing around again in the fall” for her next role — talks about that scene, which was named one of the TV season’s 50 Best in the issue of Entertainment Weekly on stands now. READ FULL STORY

HBO: Why 'Game of Thrones' gets robbed at Emmys

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When it comes to the industry’s biggest awards, Game of Thrones is almost always the bridesmaid. The HBO fantasy hit has racked up a hugely impressive 42 prime-time Emmy and Golden Globe nominations across its first three seasons. It’s also won 11 of those awards, mainly for categories like visual effects, make-up, costumes and sound effects. Yet in the major categories — best series, acting, writing and directing — Thrones has taken home just two statues (a Globe and Emmy for Peter Dinklage as best supporting actor).

What gives?

We asked HBO’s programming president Michael Lombardo about this topic during a Thrones interview, and he suggested the show’s fantasy setting and high production values might distract from the talent on display. READ FULL STORY

'Unfair' HBO knocked for 'True Detective' Emmy bid

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FX chief John Landgraf accused HBO, Showtime and Netflix of engaging in “unfair” Emmy submission practices by stretching the definitions of popular categories to score more award-season gold.

First Landgraf told reporters at his network’s upfront presentation to advertisers in New York on Wednesday that submitting True Detective as a drama was an “unfair” move, both because of the show’s stand-alone format and because networks are able to draw outsized A-list talent like Matthew McConaughey with the promise of single-season deals. “My own personal point of view is that a miniseries is a story that ends, a series is a story that continues,” Landgraf said. “To tell you the truth, I think it’s actually unfair for HBO to put True Detective in the drama series category because essentially you can get certain actors to do a closed-ended series — a la Billy Bob Thornton in Fargo or Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson in True Detective — who you can’t get to sign on for a seven-year [regular drama series] deal.”

The Wrap reported these initial comments, then Landgraf spoke to EW by phone to elaborate. The executive called the issue a “respectful debate” with his cable rivals. “It doesn’t make sense to put actors who signed on to do one year and perform the beginning, middle, and end of a character against those who are only showing one-fifth or one-sixth of that character’s journey in a season,” he said. “Matthew McConaughey is doing work every bit as good as [FX’s Americans star] Matthew Rhys, but he’ll be competing against like one-sixth of the other actor’s performance. It doesn’t strike me as particularly fair. And I can see the entire series category eventually stacked with movie actors who signed on for one series of a show.” READ FULL STORY

Emmys: HBO's 'True Detective' will compete as a drama series

HBO’s critically acclaimed crime series True Detective will compete under the drama category, rather than miniseries, at this year’s Emmys, EW confirmed.

The eight-episode limited series, starring Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson, could have easily fit under the miniseries category, but will now be entering a more crowded contest, potentially competing against such hits as AMC’s Breaking Bad and Mad Men, Showtime’s Homeland, and HBO’s own Game of Thrones, among others.

The American Horror Story franchise made the opposite move in 2012 when it switched from drama to miniseries, which had positive results, garnering the series numerous nominations.

Earlier Tuesday, Showtime also made a shift announcing that its series Shameless would switch to the comedy  category after being submitted as a drama for the past three seasons.

'Shameless' switches Emmy categories: It's a comedy now

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Shameless is changing teams. The Showtime series will compete as a comedy in this year’s Emmy Awards after being submitted as a drama the past three seasons.

Shameless has typically been described as a dramedy and has received three Emmy noms for actors on the show (though not for its star, William H. Macy). The move follows a similar decision made by Netflix, which originally intended to submit the freshman season of Orange is the New Black as a drama series, then last fall decided to submit it as a comedy instead.

Last year the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences nominated ABC’s Modern Family — which won — along with FX’s Louie, HBO’s Girls, CBS’ Big Bang Theory, NBC’s 30 Rock and HBO’s Veep. Of those, 30 Rock is not eligible this year having concluded last season. That potentially opens up at least one slot, though Fox freshman comedy and Golden Globe winner Brooklyn Nine-Nine could also be a contender.

While on the drama side, competition is fierce. The final seasons of AMC’s Breaking Bad (whose final eight episodes from last summer are eligible) and Mad Men (whose upcoming first half of its final season is eligible) are going to be tough to beat, plus there’s HBO’s chronic bridesmaid Game of Thrones, along with Showtime’s Homeland and others to worry about.

Shameless fans, you decide: Is this show a comedy or a drama?

READ FULL STORY

Emmys to split some awards categories, increase number of nominees for others

Even more changes are afoot for the Primetime Emmy Awards, especially in the Miniseries/Movie category. The Television Academy announced late Wednesday that several award categories have been altered “to ensure that the Primetime Emmy Awards accurately celebrates the excellence in our ever-evolving industry.” Among the shifts:

Outstanding Miniseries or Movie is getting split
In 2011, two formerly separate categories were combined “due to a general industry downtrend of the genre,” the TV Academy writes. But after an uptick in quality miniseries and movies, the Academy has decided to separate the categories once more this year — though only for the overall program award. All other miniseries/movies awards will remain combined between both formats.

Outstanding Reality Program is getting split
The Emmys previously named both an Outstanding Reality Competition and an Outstanding Reality Program. The latter category will now be split into Outstanding Structured Reality Program — for series with set formats, such as Antiques Roadshow or Mythbusters — and Outstanding Unstructured Reality Program, for more free-wheeling series such as Pawn Stars or Duck Dynasty.
READ FULL STORY

Emmys to be held a month earlier and on a MONDAY

The Emmys are moving to August.

Which is no surprise.

And the Emmys are moving to a Monday.

Which is a total surprise. That last time the Emmys aired on a Monday was in 1976. READ FULL STORY

'Modern Family' creator knocks death-obsessed Emmys

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Modern Family co-creator Steve Levitan said Sunday night’s Emmys were a buzz-kill due to producers over-stuffing the ceremony with tributes to fallen celebrities.

The telecast featured the usual “In Memoriam” slideshow, plus five break-out tributes scattered throughout the evening honoring talents such as James Gandolfini, Jonathan Winters and — most controversiallyGlee co-star Cory Monteith. Plus, there was a “power of television” segment touching on John F. Kennedy’s assassination. With all those black suits in the audience, one could have easily mistaken the Emmys for a funeral.

Levitan first made a reference to the ceremony being the “saddest Emmys of all time” while on stage to pick up his award for Modern Family winning best comedy series. Later he told EW the endless tributes dragged down the emotional flow of the show — particularly for host Neil Patrick Harris.

“Listen, nobody is more respectful of those who have come and gone and made a mark in this business, but I believe the Emmys should be a celebration about all that is exciting and wonderful about television,” Levitan said. “All those people are very deserving, and other people are deserving too. I thought it was too sad. Poor Neil Patrick Harris, who was so brilliant, had to keep digging himself out of the holes dug by these sad moments, time and time again. It was very difficult.” — Reporting by Tanner Stransky.

'Breaking Bad' wouldn't exist without Netflix, creator says after Emmy win

Fresh off their win for Best Drama on Sunday night, the Breaking Bad crew granted a reporter’s press room request to yell in unison: “Emmys, bitch!”

But creator Vince Gilligan remembers a time when the AMC drama wasn’t the belle of the ball. “Television has changed a lot in six years,” he said, surrounded by the show’s cast. “And I have to credit it, I’m no expert on the sociological elements of it, but I gotta think a big part of what has changed is streaming video on demand, specifically with operations like Netflix and iTunes and Amazon streaming and whatnot. I think Netflix kept us over here. Not only are we standing up here tonight and won for best show; I don’t think our show would have even lasted beyond season 2 if not for streaming video on demand, and also the social Internet component of it, where folks get to chat online with folks all around the world afterward really has helped. It’s a golden era of television, and we’ve been really fortunate that we’ve reaped the benefits of these two wonderful developments.”

Bryan Cranston, meanwhile, lost out for Lead Actor in a Drama to surprise victor Jeff Daniels, but he was ready to share the hardware with the rest of his cast and crew.
READ FULL STORY

Emmys 2013: The complete winners list

Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul were upset in their respective acting categories, but Breaking Bad won the night’s top prize, taking home its first Emmy for Best Drama. It was an unpredictable night in several major categories: In addition to The Newsroom‘s Jeff Daniels taking home the trophy for Best Actor in a Drama and Boardwalk Empire‘s Bobby Cannavale winning for Supporting Actor, Veep‘s Tony Hale and Nurse Jackie‘s Merritt Wever were surprise winners — Wever was so shocked that she practically ran off the stage without delivering an acceptance speech.

Not every category yielded a stunner, though. Modern Family was a repeat winner, taking home the Best Comedy Emmy for the fourth consecutive year, and Homeland‘s Claire Danes won Best Actress in a drama for the second year in a row. In the movie/miniseries categories, HBO’s Behind the Candelabra dominated, winning Best Movie, Best Director for Steven Soderbergh, and Best Actor for Michael Douglas.

Click below for the full list of winners from Sunday night’s 2013 Emmy Awards. READ FULL STORY

Emmys 2013: 'Modern Family' wins Best Comedy

Modern Family won the Emmy for Best Comedy Series. It’s the fourth straight win for the show — which means the ABC comedy, which is about to start it fifth season, has won for every year of eligibility. Creator Steven Levitan joked that this was a happy moment in the saddest Emmys ever, and ended his speech with a rather unique show of thanks. “None of us grew up feeling like winners. So thank you to the winners, to the bullies, to the popular kids, who rejected us and made fun of the way we ran. Without you, we never would have gone into comedy.”

Family defeated serious contenders like 30 Rock‘s final season, the ascendant HBO comedies Girls and Veep, and the critically-acclaimed Louie. Having one four times in a row, the show has now officially completed its journey from “scrappy newcomer” to “Frasier-in-1997.”

Now click here for the full list of winners at this year’s Emmys.

Emmys 2013: Claire Danes wins Emmy for 'Homeland'

Claire Danes just won the Best Actress in a Drama Emmy for Homeland. For the second straight year, the actress won for the role of unhinged superspy Carrie Mathison. She took the opportunity to say a few kind words about the late Henry Bromell, the Homeland executive producer and writer (who won a posthumous Emmy earlier in the ceremony.) She did not say “Holla!” to anyone, but maybe she’s saving that for 2014.

Now click here for the full list of winners at this year’s Emmys.

Emmys 2013: Jim Parsons wins Best Actor for 'The Big Bang Theory'

Jim Parsons has now scored a hat trick. The Big Bang Theory star won his third Best Actor Emmy for the role of Sheldon Cooper. He also took home a trophy for the CBS comedy in 2010 and 2011. “It’s so silly to be emotional,” he said.

Click here for the full list of winners.

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