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Will McAvoy threatens to quit in latest 'Newsroom' teaser

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The central question of The Newsroom‘s final season, it seems, is about a whistleblower. At least, that’s the primary focus of the latest teaser for the season, which shows a photocopier printing out what seems to be the final scripts for the series.

In the scripts, Will is concerned about the whistleblower when Reese declares, “He’s gonna be sent to jail.” On the page, Will utters the words, “Well … I think it’s time for me to quit.”

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Valerie Cherish wants another take in new 'The Comeback' teaser

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After nine years off the air, The Comeback is coming back to town.

HBO released a brief teaser lauding the series return of the 2005 comedy about aging Hollywood D-lister Valerie Cherish (Lisa Kudrow) and her aim for a return to glory.

While it seems that Cherish gained a modicum of reality-television-derived fame in the first season, the teaser implies that Cherish is still pushing for resonance in a swarm of paparazzi to the chants of “Give her another take!” It is yet another piece of meta commentary on the fact that HBO decided to give the critically acclaimed show another “take” nearly a decade after its cancellation.

The Comeback is set to return in November with a six-episode limited series.

Watch the teaser below:

What I'm Watching Now: HBO's 'Captivated' reveals why we love vilifying pretty girls

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If you’ve already binge-watched every critically acclaimed show out there and are wondering what to do next, TV critic Melissa Maerz has a few suggestions. Her column, “What I’m Watching Now,” is devoted to the best underhyped series on television (or Amazon, or Netflix, or whatever iDevice you’re using), whether they’re just premiering or have been lingering on your friends’ season pass queues for years.

Why do we love to watch pretty girls suffer?

I thought about that question a lot while watching Captivated: The Trials of Pamela Smart, a fascinating documentary that airs August 18 on HBO. Now, upon hearing the name “Pamela Smart,” your brain probably sorted through its file cabinet and plucked out this photo, recalling the 24-year-old blonde and her 1991 murder trial. I thought I knew all the details myself. Smart was a high school teacher who slept with her teenage student, Billy Flynn, right? She seduced Flynn with bikini- and lingerie-clad photos of herself, then told him she’d never sleep with him again unless he killed her husband, right? And Flynn and his friends did kill the husband, but Smart was the one who became infamous: Helen Hunt played her in a TV movie called Murder in New Hampshire, and then Nicole Kidman played her in Gus Van Sant’s 1995 film, To Die For. And now everyone knows the story by heart. Right?

Not so much. After watching Captivated, the only thing I knew for certain was that I didn’t know anything. And I’m not the only one: Even people involved in the case sometimes get the details wrong. As the first trial ever broadcast on television, Smart’s case sparked a media frenzy, making it difficult to separate the facts from the more salacious spin offered by the tabloid-driven talk shows whose popularity was peaking at the time. (Geraldo Rivera once asked, “Isn’t this trial by television?”) It turns out that Smart wasn’t Flynn’s teacher. He was a student at the same high school where she worked as an administrator. Those photos? They weren’t taken for Flynn’s benefit. Smart’s girlfriends snapped them, hoping to create a modeling portfolio for her. And the murder? Twenty-three years later, Smart still insists that Flynn acted on his own.

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Carla Gugino joins HBO's 'The Brink'

Carla Gugino will play a high-powered D.C. lawyer and wife to Tim Robbins’ Secretary of State character in a multi-episode arc on HBO’s The Brink. EW confirmed the news, as first reported by Deadline.

The dark half-hour comedy from Ocean’s Eleven producer Jerry Weintraub focuses on three men in the midst of a geopolitical crisis: the Secretary of State (Robbins), a Foreign Service officer (Jack Black) and a Navy fighter pilot (Pablo Schreiber). They must team up to try to prevent World War III. Thor‘s Jamie Alexander also stars.

The Brink does not have a scheduled premiere date yet, but Gugino can also be seen on Fox’s Wayward Pines, from M. Night Shyamalan, which will air in 2015 as a mid-season replacement.

'Girls' enlists 'Obvious Child' star Jake Lacy

Jake Lacy has landed a recurring role on Girls’ upcoming fourth season, EW has learned exclusively.

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Martin Scorsese's doc 'The 50 Year Argument' gets premiere date on HBO

Martin Scorsese’s latest documentary, The 50 Year Argument, is set to premiere on HBO Sept. 29 at 9 p.m. ET.

The documentary, directed by Scorsese and David Tedeschi, looks at The New York Review of Books and its founding editor Robert Silvers. “I have learned so much over the years from The New York Review of Books—it’s given me so much that I jumped at the chance to make this film,” Scorsese said in a press release. “And [Tedeschi] and I both welcomed the challenge of making a film that reflected what is so unique about the Review, really, a film about the adventure of thought, and, as Colm Toibin puts it, the sensuality of ideas.”

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Here's why Arya is the best character on 'Game of Thrones'

Okay, okay, we get it: You love Tyrion.

And with good reason. We love Tyrion, too! And Brienne, and Jaime, and Sansa, and everybody else who has a continuing story on Game of Thrones. Any one of them conceivably could have appeared on our list of the 25 Best Characters on TV Right Now. (Fine, that’s an overstatement; nobody’s voting for Ramsay Bolton, right?)

So naturally, when it came time for EW‘s TV staff to decide which of these fascinating creations is currently the show’s best, things got a little contentious. (See more about the list’s criteria here, where you can also vote for your favorite TV character.) In a tiebreaker vote, though, the choice became clear: Arya beat Tyrion, and by a fairly wide margin. READ FULL STORY

Netflix passes HBO in subscriber revenue

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Which team are you on: Netflix or HBO? No, it’s not so much a direct competition—but that doesn’t make it any less impressive that Netflix, which was founded in 1997, just passed HBO, founded in 1972, in subscriber revenue in the last quarter.

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings took to Facebook to share what he called the “minor milestone.” According to Hastings, Netflix earned $1.146 billion in subscriber revenue in the last quarter, where HBO only took in $1.141 billion. As Hastings put it, “They still kick our ass in profits and Emmys, but we are making progress. HBO rocks, and we are honored to be in the same league.”

Netflix, of course, is home to hit original shows Orange Is the New Black and House of Cards, while HBO houses more shows, including Game of Thrones, Girls, True Detective, and Silicon Valley, which even Hastings admits to loving. But with more original programming in the works, including Daredevil, it seems safe to say that Netflix won’t go away anytime soon.

'Hunger Games,' 'Raising Hope' actors join HBO's 'Westworld'

HBO’s Westworld is filling out its cast. The sci-fi drama series from producers J.J. Abrams and Jerry Weintraub has enlisted actors from The Hunger Games saga, Fox’s Raising Hope, and The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 2, among others.

The six new hires join previously cast stars Anthony Hopkins and Evan Rachel Wood. The pilot is based on Michael Crichton’s 1973 film set in a futuristic theme park where androids fulfill dark human desires. Below are the actors and their official role descriptions from producer Warner Bros., which provide more description about the show than what’s been released previously. One of the parts, filled by Rodrigo Santoro, seems to be HBO’s version of Yul Brynner‘s iconic killer cowboy character from the original film.  READ FULL STORY

'Game of Thrones' viewership grows to nearly 20 million

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HBO’s unsullied army has grown big enough to invade Westeros. And if you actually understand that opener, it’s probably because you’re one of the nearly 20 million people who are caught up on Game of Thrones.

As part of Time Warner’s quarterly earnings report Tuesday, the company noted that Thrones viewership has swelled to a record-high of 19 million viewers. That massive number includes all the different ways the show is consumed—original airings, repeats, DVR playback and streaming. It also represents a major gain on the next-day numbers that are usually reported, which tend to be around 7 million. READ FULL STORY

Oscar Isaac, Catherine Keener to star in HBO miniseries from 'Wire' creator David Simon

Film stars Oscar Isaac and Catherine Keener are getting in on the miniseries game, and they’re doing it with The Wire creator David Simon.

The duo are set to star in Simon and William F. Zorzi’s upcoming HBO miniseries Show Me a Hero, based on Lisa Belkin’s 1999 non-fiction book about the fight for housing desegregation in the late ‘80s.

Directed by Paul Haggis, the six-hour series follows the struggles of a young mayor ordered by the federal court to build low-income housing units in the city’s white neighborhoods—an effort that tears apart the city, the government, and ultimately the mayor himself. The series will explore the ideas of home, race, and community through its portrayal of ordinary citizens, elected officials, bureaucrats, and activists.

Isaac will star as Nick Wasicsko, described as “the youngest big-city mayor in the nation.” Keener will play Mary Dorman, “an East Yonkers homeowner who comes to a remarkable realization during the battle over where to build low-income housing.”

Simon has had a long history of success with HBO, most famously for his seminal crime saga The Wire, which aired on the network from 2002-2008. He is also responsible for the HBO miniseries Generation Kill and co-created the New Orleans drama Treme, which spanned four seasons.

Simon, Zorzi, and Haggis will executive produce Show Me a Hero, along with Nina Noble and Gail Mutrux.

Enough, already: Why I'm quitting 'The Leftovers'

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That’s it. I quit. No more.

For weeks, I’ve stuck it out with The Leftovers, which many critics (including me) have described as one of the bleakest, most brutal, most depressing dramas on television. But it wasn’t until Sunday’s episode, “Gladys,” that I decided I’d had enough. I refuse to watch another minute of this show.

It wasn’t just that a woman (the Gladys of the title, played by Marceline Hugot) got stoned to death in the episode. I’ve seen worse on my all-time favorite show, Breaking Bad. What I objected to wasn’t the violence. It was the unnecessarily aggressive way the scene played out.

Gladys doesn’t just get hit with a rock. She gets hit thirteen times. First, you see her get hit in the face, ripping a gash on her cheek. Then the camera angle changes, and you see her head backlit by flashlights, illuminating the blood that sprays upward from her soft, grey-blonde hair. Then you see her in profile, as the stone smacks into her forehead and her neck snaps back like a crash-test dummy’s. There’s another whiplash shot. More face-smashing. More blood-spurting. Until her mouth bends into a sad-clown grimace. Her head hangs limp. You can actually hear bones and cartilage getting pulverized. The hard thwack of the first hit slowly gives way to a sickeningly soft thunk. There’s the unmistakable sound of blood dripping onto the ground. Then it’s gushing. Then it’s pouring down.

That’s when she gets hit again.

Now she’s bleeding from the hair. The nose. The mouth. Thunk. Her glasses are crushed. Thunk. Her mouth hangs agape. Thunk. Finally, Gladys, who has taken a vow of silence, starts begging. “Don’t.” she says. “Please. Don’t. Please don’t. Please. Please don’t. Don’t. Please. Stop. Please.” (Or something like that. It’s hard to understand her with all of that blood in her mouth.) Thunk.

And then it’s over. But it’s not really over. It’s not enough that Gladys is dead. Later in the episode, we’re treated to a close-up view of the corpse, still tied to that tree. Then a flashback replays the murder as it’s imagined by Laurie (Amy Brenneman), who is Gladys’s vigilance partner in a cult called The Guilty Remnant. The closing scene even revisits Gladys’s dead body, as it’s being cremated. There’s a close-up of her caved-in face as it disappears into the fire. READ FULL STORY

George R.R. Martin won't write a 'Game of Thrones' episode next season

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The fifth season of HBO’s Game of Thrones is not going to have its best-known writer. Thrones author George R.R. Martin won’t pen an installment of the hit fantasy series next year, breaking a tradition that has spanned the first four seasons.

Before you get too upset, however, here’s the author’s reason: He wants to focus on writing the eagerly awaited sixth novel in his Song of Ice and Fire saga, The Winds of Winter. As fans are very much aware, Thrones is quickly catching up to the author’s storyline, with season 5 mining material from his fourth and fifth novels in the saga.

Check out the video interview from Comic-Con below. EW sat down with Martin and a few cast members to talk a bit about where each of their characters left off and what they’re looking forward to. READ FULL STORY

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