Inside TV Exclusive TV News and Scoop

Tag: Interview (1-10 of 20)

'Once Upon a Time' postmortem: Showrunners talk chilly villainess and the future of Storybrooke

EW was desperate for more information about Sunday night’s Once Upon a Time season closer — and happily, showrunners Eddy Kitsis and Adam Horowitz didn’t give us the cold shoulder. Read on to learn all about why things shook out as they did — and how the pair decided to bring in the show’s newest Big Bad. (Or, to be more accurate, its new Big Misunderstood. Caution: Spoilers ahead!)

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Take me through the decision to add Elsa to Once.
Eddy Kitsis: We saw the movie, and collectively, the whole entire writers’ room just loved it. It was our favorite film. What we loved so much about Elsa was she was perceived to be a villain, but of course we understood she was misunderstood. And the only one who understood that was her sister. That was a very thematic thing for us, which is a misunderstood character who everyone perceives to be bad. READ FULL STORY

Allison Williams on why HBO's 'Girls' are still friends -- and what's in store for season 3's finale

When we first met Lena Dunham’s Girls, each one had a clear role to play: Hannah (Lena Dunham) was our neurotic protagonist. Shoshannah (Zosia Mamet) was the naive one. Jessa (Jemima Kirke) was the selfish free spirit. And Marnie — played with pretty, uptight perfection by Allison Williams — was the only member of the group who really seemed to have her life figured out.

That was then. Since its pilot, Girls has systematically stripped away everything that helped Marnie maintain her carefully constructed facade — her long-term boyfriend, her job, even her friendships with the other girls. But even though her character started out season 3 having truly hit rock bottom — before digging even deeper — Williams is convinced that things really are looking up for Marnie as the dramedy heads into its third finale. (Even the hate-sex she’s been having with Shosh’s ex-boyfriend Ray is a net positive!) Why? See her reasoning below — as well as her thoughts on embarrassing music videos, offscreen curveballs, and why these four are still friends, despite all evidence that they shouldn’t be.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: I want to start out by asking point blank if you, personally, like Marnie.
ALLISON WILLIAMS:
[Laughs] I do! I would probably be friends with her — I’m sure she would drive me crazy, but I would employ a very straightforward method of communicating with her. I think she’s someone who benefits from that — I think she really is drawn to people who are somewhat direct, if not slightly mean to her. READ FULL STORY

'American Horror Story': Stevie Nicks on her 'Coven' cameo: 'Don't you know? I have powers now!'

The White Witch has arrived! As promised, tonight’s new American Horror Story: Coven will feature a special guest turn from rock legend Stevie Nicks. It’s shaping up to be an exciting episode for Fleetwod Mac fans and Lily Rabes everywhere: Nicks will not only cross paths with her biggest fan, the supernatural swampstress Misty Day (Rabe), but she’ll also perform a certain witchy Fleetwood Mac classic.

Plus, she’s bringing a new course to Miss Robichaux’s Academy: Shawl Twirling 101 (which you can catch a sneak peak of in the video below). EW talked to Nicks about her AHS: Coven debut, meeting Rabe and the gang, and the presents she brought to the set. And if you’re worried about those old rumors about her being an actual real-life witch resurfacing, don’t be: “Don’t you know? I have powers now!” she says.

EW: Ryan Murphy had told us that when he first pitched you to be on the show, you were hesitant. What ultimately made you decide to do it?

STEVIE NICKS: When they called and asked me if they could use my music, they just explained it a little bit: there’s a character, and you’re a muse because she listens only to you — and she lives out in the swamp. And that was good enough for me! I’m like, sure you can! So whether it was a Fleetwood Mac song or Stevie Nicks song, they were going to choose a song that fit into their story. I thought, fantastic — as a songwriter, you could not ask for anything more. And I’m pretty close to them because of Glee, of course. So I said, sure, take my music — absolutely.

READ FULL STORY

'Sleepy Hollow': Tom Mison on becoming Ichabod Crane and season 1's hair-raising finale

What’s the secret to Sleepy Hollow‘s success? It’s easy to point to any number of factors — breakneck pacing, sharp writing, a supernatural premise that takes itself just seriously enough. Ask a Sleepyhead to answer that question, though, and chances are they’ll respond with just two words: Tom Mison, a.k.a. the English stage actor who stars as moody, arch, utterly captivating man out of time Ichabod Crane.

Nobody’s more surprised by how well the show has hit than Mison himself. “We’re [shooting] in some dark corner of deepest North Carolina — [so] we’re kind of in a bit of a bubble,” he tells EW. “We weren’t aware of how many billboards there were all over New York, for example, or how much it was promoted on telly.” Now, though, the word is out — and the humble Brit is having a blast both filming the show and keeping up with the fervent fanbase it’s already produced. “They’re very clever people watching,” he says, “which is a dream. It’s so nice to be part of something that inspires people.”

Before the series returns from a baseball-induced hiatus with an all-new episode tonight, read on to learn how Mison snagged the role of a lifetime — as well as his thoughts on Ichabod’s never-changing outfit, Sleepy‘s twisted version of American history, and Crane’s future with Detective Abbie Mills (Nicole Beharie), the Scully to Ichabod’s Mulder.

READ FULL STORY

'Orange Is the New Black': Matt McGorry on playing cute guard Bennett and being a piece of meat

Matt McGorry did not go directly to jail. Instead, he started performing at just 11 years old, when a flair for card tricks and making little foam balls disappear led to a brief stint as a street magician. (“It’s funny — it didn’t seem weird at the time,” he told EW during a recent office visit. “But in retrospect, my parents really had a lot of trust in me.”)

From there, McGorry moved on to bigger and better things — New York City’s famous LaGuardia performing arts high school, Emerson College, and an acting career both enhanced and stymied by his second gig as a competitive bodybuilder. (At his peak, the NY native could deadlift 576 pounds.) Even though McGorry was finding steady-ish work in funny web videos — a friend at College Humor told him “that they’re always looking for buff dudes and hot girls, because those are, I guess, rarities in the comedy community” — he realized eventually that his impressive stature would mean a future of typecasting.

So McGorry put down the weights, renewed his focus on acting — and nabbed the role of John Bennett on Orange Is the New Black, Netflix’s buzzy series about a women’s prison. Just like that, the guy who was once relegated to playing “Frat Friend” and “EMT #1″ found himself getting increasingly juicier material and acting for guest director Jodie Foster. (“When I saw Jodie Foster [written on a script], I went to IMDB,” he remembered. “I was like, ‘Is there another Jodie Foster? With like, a Q at the end?'”). Once the series premiered to rave reviews, McGorry also found himself becoming a bona-fide heartthrob — complete with a fawning Buzzfeed tribute that’s been viewed almost 200,000 times.

How does McGorry feel about his sudden-onset success, his character’s arc — and a possible Bennett/Pornstache spinoff? You won’t have to travel directly to Litchfield to find out.
READ FULL STORY

'SNL': Veteran Kenan Thompson on the show's big cast exodus -- and its future

The times are a’changin’ at Saturday Night Live. Jason Sudeikis recently confirmed his exit from the show — joining fellow vets Fred Armisen and Bill Hader, both of whom said their goodbyes during May’s season finale. And that’s not the last of it: When Seth Meyers jumps ship in 2014 to prepare to take over NBC‘s Late Night, SNL will lose not only a longtime cast member (and Weekend Update anchor), but also its head writer since 2006.

It’s a lot for one show to handle all at once — especially coming just a year after cast MVP Kristen Wiig and Digital Short mastermind Andy Samberg (along with the rest of his Lonely Island crew) stepped away from SNL as well.

After the dust settles and Meyers finally says his last goodbye, SNL‘s cast will only boast one person who’s been around since before the Bush administration’s final days: Kenan Thompson, a former child star who joined the show in 2003. Add on the five years he spent performing on Nickelodeon’s All That, and Thompson has been doing televised sketch comedy even longer than Darrell Hammond — who stuck around Studio 8H for 14 seasons, making him the longest-tenured cast member in Saturday Night Live history.

READ FULL STORY

'Covert Affairs' creators talk season premiere bombshells (and where we go from here)

SPOILER ALERT! If you haven’t watched tonight’s Covert Affairs season premiere, stop reading now. Creators Matt Corman and Chris Ord take us through the big twists and tease what’s next.
READ FULL STORY

'Anna Nicole' a 'new kind' of Lifetime movie, 'American Psycho' director Mary Harron says

It’s no longer shocking when established film directors turn to TV — after all, Martin Scorsese, Jane Campion, and David Fincher have all done it recently to great acclaim.

Still, you may be surprised to learn that Lifetime’s upcoming Anna Nicole Smith biopic was directed by none other than Mary Harron — a filmmaker best known for her wicked work on controversial cult favorites like I Shot Andy Warhol and American Psycho. Thanks in part to Harron’s pedigree, the movie also managed to attract an unusually accomplished cast, including Oscar winner Martin Landau (as Anna Nicole’s wealthy husband J. Howard Marshall), Oscar nominee Virginia Madsen (as Anna’s mother, Virgie), indie stalwart Adam Goldberg (as Anna’s lawyer and companion, Howard K. Stern), and Princess Bride star-turned-character actor Cary Elwes (as J. Howard’s scheming son E. Pierce Marshall).

So how did a movie maverick find herself on the set of a made-for-TV flick about a notorious celebrity train wreck? Easy — the film’s producers, Craig Zadan and Neil Maron, simply called her up and asked if she wanted the job. (Zadan and Maron must have a thing for Marilyn Monroe; their canceled series Smash revolved around a Marilyn musical, while Anna Nicole is peppered with references to Monroe being Smith’s idol.)

“They said they wanted to do a director-driven movie, and that was very interesting,” Harron explained in a phone interview. “And I thought it was interesting to try and do a TV movie that was like a movie-movie, in a way.”

What is it that separates Anna Nicole from a garden-variety Lifetime movie — and why does Harron think we’re still fascinated with Smith’s story, even six years after her death? The answer lies in Anna Nicole‘s unique approach to its subject, according to the director — and the enduring allure of the “beauty queen” story.
READ FULL STORY

Rob Lowe on his crazy transformation for Liberace biopic 'Behind the Candelabra'

Steven Soderbergh’s HBO film Behind the Candelabra is full of WTF moments, but Rob Lowe’s physical transformation as Liberace’s plastic surgeon Dr. Startz might be the most jaw-dropping. Read on for Lowe’s take on his disturbing yet fascinating makeover, the similarities between Dr. Startz and Lowe’s Parks and Recreation character, and what it was like to see “Gordon Gekko banging Jason Bourne.” READ FULL STORY

'Once Upon a Time': Michael Raymond-James talks this week's finale and Baelfire's fate

Of all the characters introduced or highlighted for the first time during Once Upon a Time‘s second season — including Captain Hook, Mulan, Princess Aurora, Lancelot, and even Dr. Victor Frankenstein — none is as pivotal to the show’s master plot as Neal Cassady, a.k.a. Rumpelstiltskin’s prodigal son Baelfire. Rumpel engineered the dark curse that created the town of Storybrooke purely so that he could find his long-lost child, meaning that Once itself wouldn’t exist if not for Bae. He spent a significant amount of time in Never Land, giving Once‘s writers an opportunity to introduce an entirely new world in season 2 (and beyond). And coincidentally, Bae also had an intense relationship with Emma Swan, daughter of Snow White and Prince Charming — one that resulted in the birth of Henry Mills, a.k.a. the fulcrum of the series (for better or worse).

As of now, Bae’s fate is uncertain: when last we saw the guy, he was suffering from a mortal bullet wound and falling through a portal to an unknown other land. But though Bae’s in no position to speak for himself, the actor who portrays him — Michael Raymond-James, late of True Blood and FX’s gone-too-soon Terriers — was happy to chat with EW before Once‘s finale this Sunday, May 12. Read on for more about Bae’s journey — as well as whether Raymond-James believes that his character and Jennifer Morrison’s Emma are meant to be.

First things first: Are we going to see Bae again before the end of the season?
I don’t know how to answer that! Are you asking, do I die?

READ FULL STORY

'Million Second Quiz': An NBC exec explains the net's Orwellian reality experiment

NBC.jpg

When word broke last week that NBC had ordered a new reality game show featuring 24/7 competition, a possible $10 million dollar cash prize, and — oh yeah — live broadcasts for 12 consecutive days from “a gigantic hourglass shaped structure in the heart of Manhattan,” where the game’s champions will also live for the duration of the contest, the news was greeted with a collective “Huh?” The Million Second Quiz, frankly, sounded more like a ludicrous, Truman Show-inspired reality show parody than an actual event that will air on network TV this fall.

But according to Paul Telegdy, NBC’s president of alternative and late night programming, the show is actually “mind-blowingly simple when you really lay it out.” And perhaps more importantly, Telegdy swears that The Million Second Quiz will feel more current than the vast majority of today’s popular reality shows — nearly all of which were created before online video and social media had come into wide use. (The exception to that rule? The Voice, “which, lucky enough, is on NBC.”)

READ FULL STORY

'Vikings' season finale: Mysterious beauty tempts Ragnar -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO AND INTERVIEW

Season 1 of History’s first-ever scripted series, Vikings, comes to a close this Sunday, and EW has your exclusive first look at a mysterious new character introduced in the episode – one who could spell trouble for Viking hero Ragnar Lothbrok’s (Travis Fimmel) marriage to Lagertha (Katheryn Winnick).

Last week on Vikings, all was not well in the formerly blissful union of Ragnar and Lagertha. Seeking answers from the gods in the death of his unborn son during the clan’s traditional pilgrimage to Uppsalla, Ragnar also began to wonder who would be the mother of the many sons the gods promised him if it wasn’t his wife.

Enter Princess Aslaug, played by Alyssa Sutherland. We meet Aslaug when Ragnar’s men, journeying from Kattegat to Gotaland (modern day Sweden) to resolve a land dispute, stumble across her bathing naked in a stream. She demands an apology from Ragnar, and the chemistry between the pair is immediate and undeniable.

Who is this woman? Will Ragnar remain faithful to his wife Lagertha through their troubles? We asked Sutherland to weight in on her character and what to expect from the episode. Check out what she had to say, as well as two exclusive clips from the Vikings season 1 finale, below.

READ FULL STORY

'Mad Men': Linda Cardellini on her top-secret, watercooler-worthy debut

SPOILER ALERT! This post contains information about key plot points in the season premiere of Mad Men. If you haven’t watched Sunday’s episode,  continue at your own risk.
READ FULL STORY

Advertisement

Latest Videos in TV

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP