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Tag: James Gandolfini (1-10 of 16)

John Turturro replaces Robert De Niro in HBO's 'Criminal Justice'

John Turturro has replaced Robert De Niro as the star of Criminal Justice, the seven-hour HBO miniseries that was once conceived as a James Gandolfini vehicle. Based on a 2008 BBC drama of the same name, Justice was slated to be The Sopranos‘ star’s high-profile return to an HBO series, and he had filmed the pilot before he died last June. HBO recruited De Niro in September to assume the lead role, but as the Hollywood Reporter initially wrote, he’s now out, as is his Tribeca Films production company.

Turturro will play Jack Stone, an unscrupulous New York City lawyer who defends a Pakistani man (Riz Ahmed) accused of murder. Bill Camp, Peyman Moaadi (A Separation), and Poorna Jagannathan also star. Steve Zaillian (All the King’s Men) will direct a script written by novelist Richard Price (The Wire).

 

HBO plans to air James Gandolfini tribute

The network that cemented James Gandolfini’s iconic-star-status will air a tribute to the late actor this Sunday.

Gandolfini died on June 19 at the age of 51 from a heart attack. Best known for portraying Tony Soprano on HBO’s The Sopranos from 1999-2007, it was a role that scored him a Golden Globe and three Emmys.

HBO will air James Gandolfini: Tribute to a Friend on Dec. 22, from 8:30-9:05 p.m. ET/PT, according to a press release. The actor’s friends and colleagues will honor his memory in the 35-minute-long program. Clips of Gandolfini’s work and behind-the-scenes footage will also be shown.

HBO greenlights 'Criminal Justice' miniseries, Robert De Niro in for James Gandolfini

After months of will-they-or-won’t-they speculation about HBO’s seven-part miniseries Criminal Justice, HBO has decided to move forward with the project. EW has confirmed that the mini-series, which was given the greenlight back in May when James Gandolfini was set to star, is moving forward once again, now with Robert De Niro in the lead role.

Based on the 2008 BBC series by Peter Moffat, Criminal Justice is set in New York City, where an attorney (De Niro) is a bit too ambitious in taking on the case of a Pakistani being accused of murder. Riz Ahmed, Bill Camp, Payman Maadi, and Poorna Jagannathan will also star.

Gandolfini remains an executive producer on the project posthumously, with Steven Zaillian set to direct the first hour.

Emmys to feature special 'In Memoriam' tributes to Cory Monteith, James Gandolfini, more

In addition to the traditional “In Memoriam” segment of the Emmys, this year’s broadcast will feature a special tribute for “five individuals who warrant special recognition,” according to a press release.

During the ceremony, Edie Falco will pay tribute to her Sopranos co-star James Gandolfini, Michael J. Fox will honor his Family Ties producer Gary David Goldberg, Jane Lynch will speak about Glee co-star Cory Monteith, Rob Reiner will take the stage to talk about his All in the Family co-star Jean Stapleton, and Robin Williams will pay tribute to his mentor Jonathan Winters.

The Emmys air Sunday at 8 p.m. on CBS.

HBO: It's unimaginable that Gandolfini pilot will air

An HBO executive says it’s unimaginable that a drama pilot featuring one of James Gandolfini’s final performances will air.

Gandolfini shot a pilot for Criminal Justice, an adaptation of the 2008 BBC series. Gandolfini played a low-rent New York City attorney.

The 51-year-old star of The Sopranos died of a heart attack in June. READ FULL STORY

James Gandolfini tribute: HBO offers 'Sopranos' on demand, will reair Iraq war documentary

In honor of the late James Gandolfini, HBO announced plans Monday to offer every season of The Sopranos on HBO On Demand for one month each, starting with season 1 in July and season 2 in August. HBO will also replay Alive Day Memories: Home From Iraq, the 2007 documentary executive-produced by Gandolfini, on the Fourth of July.

Gandolfini, who died June 19 of a heart attack at age 51, was laid to rest last week at a Manhattan funeral attended by Alec Baldwin, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and nearly every actor who appeared on The Sopranos over its six-season run. Sopranos creator David Chase delivered a eulogy at the service.
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On the scene: Family, friends, and fans remember James Gandolfini at Manhattan funeral

They came in suits and shorts, heels and flip-flops, somber dresses, casual T-shirts — and at least one black tank top embellished with a message hand-written in alternating red, white, and green paint: “Riposa in Pace, Capo.”

“I have to show my respect,” the tank top’s designer — Assunta, a silver-haired woman from Yonkers — said, gesturing to her handiwork. “You can read it, if you like: ‘Rest in peace, Boss.’ That’s what he is. He was the boss.”

Assunta had gathered with what seemed like all of New York City’s Italian-American community — not to mention Mario Batali, Alec Baldwin, Steve Buscemi, Chris Christie, a gaggle of Sopranos cast members, and fans of countless other ethnic backgrounds — to say goodbye to James Gandolfini, who died suddenly of a heart attack June 19.

The funeral was held at the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine, which stands just south of Columbia University. (“It’s by Meadow [Soprano]!” Assunta explained.) Saint John also happens to be the fourth-largest church in the world, making it one of the only sites in New York capable of holding hordes of Gandolfini’s mourners.
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David Chase's eulogy for James Gandolfini -- FULL TEXT

Earlier this morning, friends, family, and hundreds of fans gathered to pay their respects to James Gandolfini at Manhattan’s Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine. Four mourners — Gandolfini’s wife, Deborah Lin Gandolfini; his assistant, Thomas Richardson; his acting coach, Susan Aston; and his old boss, Sopranos creator David Chase — delivered eulogies at the service.

A transcript of Chase’s speech, which he structured as a letter to his late friend, is reprinted below.

Dear Jim,

Your family asked me to speak at this service. I am so honored and touched. I’m also really scared, and I say that because you, of all people, understand this. I would like to run away and then call you four days from now from the beauty parlor. [Ed. note: That’s a reference to a 2002 incident in which Gandolfini disappeared from the set of The Sopranos, eventually calling the show’s production office four days later from a beauty salon in Brooklyn.]

I want to do a good job because I love you, and because you always did a good job.

I think the deal is, I’m supposed to speak about the actor, the artist, the work part of your life. Others will have spoken beautifully about the other beautiful and magnificent parts of you — father, brother, friend. That’s what I was told. I’m supposed to also speak for your cast mates, who you loved; for your crew that you loved so much; the people at HBO; and Journey. I hope I can speak for all of them and pay credit to them and to you.

Experts told me to start with a joke, recite a funny anecdote. Ha ha ha. But as you yourself so often said, “I’m not feelin’ it.” I’m too sad and full of despair. I’m running too partly because I would like to have had your advice, because I remember how you did speeches. I saw you do a lot of them at awards shows and stuff, and invariably, I think you would scratch two or three thoughts on a sheet of paper and put it in your pocket, and then not really refer to it. And consequently, a lot of your speeches didn’t make sense.

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James Gandolfini funeral to be held Thursday

The funeral for James Gandolfini has been scheduled for Thursday in Manhattan, HBO confirmed Sunday on behalf of his family. The service will be held at the Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine in Manhattan at 10 a.m.

The 51-year-old actor, who won three Emmys for his portrayal of crime boss Tony Soprano on The Sopranos, died of a heart attack Wednesday in Rome. Gandolfini’s remains are expected to be repatriated to the U.S. as early as Monday.

Read more:
James Gandolfini dead at 51
David Chase on James Gandolfini: ‘He was a genius’
Celebrities react to James Gandolfini’s death
James Gandolfini: 10 movie roles

Friend: James Gandolfini's body may return to U.S. on Monday

A family spokesman says James Gandolfini’s body may be repatriated as soon as Monday.

Michael Kobold told reporters Sunday that the “provisional plan” is to depart Rome on Monday afternoon for the United States, several days earlier than anticipated. He did not specify which U.S. airport.

Kobold thanked Italian and U.S. authorities, including U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, his predecessor Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton for helping with arrangements.
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James Gandolfini was 'the glue that kept us together,' says lifelong friend Karen Duffy

Jimmy and I grew up together. We were friends since seventh grade and we went to a small high school in New Jersey. It was impossible not to love this kid. He was voted Best Looking and Class Flirt. Girls loved him because he was beautiful, inside and out. He was a great athlete and we did the plays together. Jimmy was quiet in person but explosive on stage. In my yearbook, he kind of wrote something like, “Duff, I’ll see you on Broadway.”

Fairly quickly out of college, he was working in the city and immediately started getting acting work. That was kind of just when I started modeling, and I was on MTV when he was on Broadway in A Streetcar Named Desire. Serendipitously, Jimmy and I ended up living next door to each other in the Village, so we never have not been in touch. We’ve shared experiences and milestones in our lives, so I remember him sitting on his stoop having coffee and telling me he was going to be a father for the first time.

What was so great was that he always felt connected and responsible and deeply loyal to the people he grew up with. If you were a friend of Jim’s, he remained not just friendly, but an actively engaged friend. He made an art of friendship. When I was going through my illness, he was incredible supportive. Always the first thing that he said when we saw each other was, “How you feeling? How’s your kid?” He remembered your kid. He remembered your family.

I remember going with him to the first ever Sopranos premiere at John’s Pizza, and Jimmy invited all of his buddies from high school. He was like that. He would never say, “No” to a friend. A lot of the crew on The Sopranos were friends from high school. When he first had some success, I remember him saying to the fellas, the buddies he was hanging around with, he was like, “We’re good now.” It was always him taking it for the team. READ FULL STORY

Vincent Pastore on James Gandolfini: 'He had the biggest heart, the biggest heart ever'

James Gandolfini’s Sopranos co-star Vincent Pastore joined EW’s Melissa Maerz on Sirius XM Thursday to talk about the legacy of Tony Soprano and working with Gandolfini. Pastore, who starred in the HBO show’s first two seasons as Salvatore “Big Pussy” Bonpensiero and appeared in cameos over the following years of the series, describes Gandolfini as a generous soul who was always looking out for his castmates and friends. Clearly emotional after learning of Gandolfini’s sudden death, Pastore talks with Maerz about Gandolfini’s family — both TV and real life — and about the last time they saw each other, at the 12-12-12 Hurricane Sandy relief event. A selection of their conversation is below and you can listen to clips of the interview via Soundcloud.
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In wake of James Gandolfini's death, 'Sopranos' sales are up

Further proof that TV lovers won’t fuhgeddabout the late James Gandolfini anytime soon: Since the three-time Emmy winner’s untimely demise, sales of The Sopranos on DVD and digital download have risen dramatically on Amazon and iTunes, two of the only venues through which the show — off the air since 2007 — can be viewed today. (A&E began airing edited versions of Sopranos episodes in 2007, but the show no longer appears on the cable net’s schedule. Though the show is also available via HBO Go, HBO declines to share numbers for its streaming service.)

A $124.99, 30-disc set that contains the award-winning HBO series in its entirety has shot to the top of Amazon’s Movies & TV Best Sellers list, ranking only behind an instantly watchable version of the latest episode of Mad Men. The Sopranos: The Complete Series also tops Amazon’s DVD Best Sellers list, while The Sopranos: The Complete First Season ranks seventh and The Sopranos: Season 6, Part 2 (the series’ last set of episodes) ranks 10th. Season 6: Part 1 appears on the chart as well, at No. 14.
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