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Disney XD sets premiere for 'Lost'-themed 'Phineas and Ferb' episode

Phineas and Ferb are getting Lost.

Disney XD has set a premiere date for the upcoming Lost-themed episode, which features a story from Damon Lindelof and guest-star Terry O’Quinn, who played John Locke on the ABC drama.

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Another 'Lost' alum to guest on 'Hawaii Five-0'

Another Lost vet is set to pop up on Hawaii Five-0: William Mapother, who played creepy island resident Ethan Rom, will guest-star in an episode of the CBS police drama, EW has learned. READ FULL STORY

Listen: Patrick J. Adams reveals why he really guest starred on 'Pretty Little Liars'

Suits star Patrick J. Adams visited EW Radio (SiriusXM 105) on Monday, and while he started The Editor’s Hour off right by singing along to Foreigner’s “I Want to Know What Love Is”—he has a lovely falsetto—his performance during our “You Said It!” game is what you really need to hear. How it works: We read lines from some of his previous TV credits, and he tries to identify the show and provide an interesting anecdote about shooting the role.

Listen to highlights below, which include Adams sharing how he guested on Pretty Little Liars in 2010 to win back series star Troian Bellisario, who’d broken up with him (it worked, they’re engaged), failed to play it cool alongside Lost‘s Terry O’Quinn, and almost got his own Ghost Whisperer spin-off. And psst, Orphan Black fans: He also describes how Helena’s hair really feels. READ FULL STORY

InsideTV Podcast: Terry O'Quinn reflects on Locke, 'Lost', and THAT ending

He played one of the most charismatic characters in TV history, so when Terry O’Quinn popped by Entertainment Weekly Radio (SiriusXM, channel 105) to talk about his new Fox drama Gang Related (which debuts May 22), we knew we also had to chat with him about his Emmy winning turn as John Locke on Lost. Apparently, we are not alone, as O’Quinn told us that people still stop him on the street hoping to crack the code on that character and the show in general. “That’s what people generally stop me for and talk to me about now is Lost,” says O’Quinn. “And sometimes they call me John and that’s fine. And I don’t mind it. I understand what Lost was and I count my blessings. I’m usually happy to talk to people. I don’t think I’ve ever had anybody say anything negative to me about it except ‘I didn’t get the ending. What the hell was that all about?’ And I’m like talk to Damon Lindelof!” READ FULL STORY

'Lost' exec producer Carlton Cuse looks back at plotting the finale -- and picks TV's best goodbye

The finale of a TV show can provoke all sorts of feelings — from devastation to elation, from closure to closed-fist anger — and Lost‘s last episode has drawn the full spectrum from different factions of its deeply passionate fan base. Four years after its airing, the epic and polarizing farewell installment of ABC’s obsessed-over mystery drama about a group of plane-crash survivors on a bizarro island still has people talking/debating/clogging message boards. (Should you need a refresher and/or guidance, may we suggest (re)reading Doc Jensen’s insightful recap.) As this is the time of year when veteran series often ascend into the afterlife  — How I Met Your Mother signed off with a fair share of controversy a few weeks ago —  we decided to explore the finale phenomenon with a story in EW‘s April 11 issue titled “The Art of Saying Goodbye.” The creators and showrunners of 10 iconic shows shared with us the challenges of trying to satisfyingly wrap up years of story in a single episode. In the bonus Q&A that follows, Lost exec producer Carlton Cuse — who wrote “The End” with co-creator/exec producer Damon Lindelof —  discusses how they plotted the final beats of the Lost saga, why they opted for a spiritual resolution instead of answering questions, and how the overwhelming pressure placed on a show’s last episode can “only lead to disappointment.” READ FULL STORY

Damon Lindelof reveals details about his new HBO drama 'The Leftovers'

Damon Lindelof returns to the world of television this summer with a novel concept —  literally and figuratively. The Lost co-creator is adapting Tom Perrotta’s 2011 bestseller The Leftovers into an HBO drama series (starring Justin Theroux, Liv Tyler, and Amy Brenneman, among others) that follows the residents of New York town three years after a rapture-like event whisked away 140 million people across the globe. Pick up a copy of EW’s 2014 Preview Issue to steal a glance at a script page from the first episode, which is directed by Peter Berg (who is also an executive producer on the show). Below, Lindelof reveals more to EW about this highly anticipated disappearing act.

On his decision to make another TV show and what attracted him to The Leftovers
“When Lost was ending, the two questions were: ‘What are your feelings about the ending of Lost?’ And ‘What’s next?’ The way I was answering the ‘What’s next?’ question was, ‘I don’t really want to think about it right now — I just want to enjoy this process,’ but the truth was ‘I don’t know if I can ever do another television show again because I’m so terrified that it’ll be just so much less than Lost,’ and I didn’t quite know any classy way of articulating that idea…. I went off into movie-ville with no real strong feelings about whether or not I was going to do TV again. I’m fairly monogamous when it comes to whatever project I’m working on, so I spent a year working on Prometheus and nothing else and then I spent a year working on Star Trek: Into Darkness. And then I was reading The New York Times Book Review – which is the way that I pretend to read books; I read the reviews of the books and then I can articulately pretend like I’ve read them — and Stephen King wrote a review of The Leftovers, which he described as the best episode of The Twilight Zone that had never been shot. I was a Perotta fan. I read Little Children and The Abstinence Teacher and just on the premise alone [of The Leftovers]. I was completely and totally engaged by this idea. I ran and got the book immediately and I got maybe 50 pages in before I decided: This should be a television show and I need to collaborate with Tom [Perrotta, who is an exec producer and co-wrote the pilot with Lindelof] on that show. It took a year for things to sort themselves out but there was never any doubt as to like, ‘Should this be my next project?’ It was love at first sight.”
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PaleyFest full lineup announced: 'Lost' reunion, 'How I Met Your Mother,' and more

We already told you Veronica Mars would kick off PaleyFest 2014, the Paley Center for Media’s TV fan festival. Now, the whole schedule has been released — and if you’re still not over Lost, you’re going to want to book some tickets to Los Angeles, stat.

In addition to a 10-year reunion panel for the iconic drama, the festival will also feature panels from How I Met Your Mother, The Vampire Diaries, and Parks and Recreation (a group that is, no surprise, always hilarious at the festival).

“With this amazing mix of new shows, returning favorites, and two high-profile cast reunions, PaleyFest 2014 will be a must-attend event for TV fans who attend every year from all over the world,” said Pat Mitchell, the president and CEO of The Paley Center for Media, in a release. “The caliber of talent participating in PaleyFest this year is absolutely unrivaled in the industry and we hope fans will not only have a great time interacting with the casts and creators, but will also learn about how their favorite shows get made.”

The full schedule is below: READ FULL STORY

Josh Holloway on his new CBS drama 'Intelligence' and the 'Lost' castmate he'd recruit for a crossover episode

Josh Holloway was Lost for many years, and now he’s found his way back to your TV set. He stars in the CBS drama Intelligence (tonight, 9 p.m.) as Gabriel Vaughn, a former Delta Force who gets a computer chip in his brain courtesy of U.S. Cyber Command, which turns him into an intel-stuffed super agent. You can read our interrogation of Holloway in the Midseason TV preview issue of EW, but in the meantime, check out this bonus Q&A with him. READ FULL STORY

'The Mentalist': How the 'Red John' mystery captured the imagination, then lost it

It was Rebecca that made me pay attention to The Mentalist. I had never seen the CBS crime drama starring Simon Baker until the eighth episode of season 2. “His Red Right Hand” was the one where a secretary in the Sacramento offices of the California Bureau of Investigation shot Sam Bosco (Terry Kinney) and two other agents on behalf of a serial killer — Red John, a brilliant phantom with a blood-drawn smiley face insignia, powerful influence and connections, and a scores of similarly brain-sick and unnervingly gleeful devotees.

In the last act, an assassin — presumably Red John himself; we never saw his mug — silenced Rebecca by deftly applying poison on her wrists. When Rebecca saw him, she recognized him, and her eyes lit up happily, and she smiled the smile of a fawning fangirl. It was all so eerie, and well played by the actress, Shauna Bloom. In the aftermath, the head of the CBI office, Virgil Minelli, played by Gregory Itzin, aka The Despicable Nixonian President on 24, abruptly resigned to take early retirement. Now that was suspect. I was instantly convinced Virgil was Red John. C’mon! Despicable Nixonian President on 24! And then, Bosco, on his death bed, told the show’s hero, con man-turned-trickster detective Patrick Jane, that if the carny Sherlock should ever catch Red John, he shouldn’t arrest him, he should kill him. He whispered something into Patrick’s ear and died. What did he say? WHAT DID HE SAY?!

My imagination was captured. I knew I’d be sticking with the show to watch Patrick solve the mystery: Who was Red John?
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'The Good Wife' and the problem of too much good TV

The moment I finally became a fan of The Good Wife occurred just about three weeks ago. It came in the current season’s widely praised fifth episode, “Hitting The Fan.” This was the one where Will (Josh Charles) and Diane (Christine Baranski) fired Alicia (Julianna Margulies) and Cary (Matt Czuchry) for plotting to start their own firm. As Will progressed from betrayal (his reaction, a symphonically-performed shock-face culminating in a downbeat “what?!”, was priceless) to “commando mode” (rallying emergency quorums; hustling clients to keep them from bolting), and as Alicia progressed from resolute yet regretful to full-on “Oh, it’s so on!” (countering Will’s counter-attacks; wooing Chum Hum; an adrenaline rush quickie with Governor Hubby), it was thrilling to watch them find new energy and purpose in their lives amid the crisis, if slightly heartbreaking to watch the former lovers, now former colleagues, become enemies. It was impossible to take a side; I wanted both to win. In a story full of such grand drama and significant developments, it was a smaller, funnier exchange between Alicia and Will that grabbed me. As a contentious phone conversation came to a close (“Go to hell!” “No, you go to hell!”), Will remembered something very important. “Oh, your daughter called,” he said, suddenly civil. “She needs you to call her school to let her go on a field trip.” “Oh. When was this?” Alicia asked, equally pleasant. “About 40 minutes ago.”  “Thank you.” “You’re welcome.” Click. And then war resumed.

Not a terribly ingenious scene, I grant you. It hewed to a familiar screwball comedic structure. The whiplash tonal shift; two rivals abruptly making nice or banal in a way that almost feels out of character. Except here, the moment felt true to the characters, at least as I understand them so far. It was an effective way to dramatize that their relationship was more complex than their current conflict, to show that neither of them should be defined by the crisis/concerns consuming them at present; and it was a moment that was representative of all of everything else in the show that was converting me to rabid Good Wife fandom. READ FULL STORY

'Hawaii Five-0' stages 'Lost' reunion with Jorge Garcia guest spot -- EXCLUSIVE

Hawaii Five-0 sure loves its Lost alums!

The latest to join Daniel Dae Kim on the CBS drama? Jorge Garcia, who EW can exclusively report is set to appear in an episode early next season. He will play a brilliant conspiracy theorist and reportedly share scenes with former Lost co-star Kim.

Five-0, which will move to Fridays in the fall, has a history of staging Lost reunions. Terry O’Quinn, Tania Raymonde and Reiko Aylesworth have all previously had guest roles.

The upcoming fourth season of the series does not yet have a fall premiere date. But you can see the full fall schedule here.

Related:
‘How I Met Your Mother’ cast going to Comic-Con for first time
‘Big Bang Theory’ and HBO are big winners at Critics’ Choice Television Awards

CBS' Fall Schedule: A Snap Judgment

Who says CBS doesn’t make bold programming moves? Oh, that’s right: Everyone. But everyone would be slightly wrong! At yesterday’s upfront presentation, the nation’s most-watched — if least-interesting — broadcast television network surprised reporters by revealing that it was not green-lighting two high-profile potential series: A small screen revival of Beverly Hills Cop from executive producer Shawn Ryan (The Shield) starring Brandon T. Jackson as the son of Axel Foley and a recurring Eddie Murphy; and NCIS: Red, starring John Corbett and Kim Raver. Beverly Hills Cop might find a home elsewhere, while NCIS: Red was deemed unworthy of the franchise’s creative standards. (Why are you giggling?)

CBS also made news with some bold scheduling swaps and shifts. Mike & Molly is being held for midseason (but received a full order of 22 episodes); Hawaii 5-0 is sailing to Friday; and Person of Interest is relocating to Tuesday, joining NCIS and NCIS: Los Angeles to form a blockbuster night of brawny drama. Thursday now has two hours of comedy, a mirror to its Monday night block of powerhouse yukkers. With few holes to fill and (quoting network president Nina Tassler) “limited shelf space,” CBS ordered just eight new shows, five of which will premiere this fall. Here, CBS was true to form: All have potential to be watched by a broad audience, and very few seem all that creatively daring. To be fair, it’s hard to glean meaningful insight from the preview videos released by the network, comprised of select scenes, behind the scenes footage, and rah-rah interviews with actors and producers. And while CBS may not have leveraged its position of great strength to take a chance on innovation, I found something commendable about each of its new offerings. READ FULL STORY

EP Carlton Cuse: 'Bates Motel' 'is one part 'Friday Night Lights,' one part 'Lost' and one part 'Twin Peaks"

A&E

A&E

Tonight at 10pm, A&E debuts their highly anticipated Psycho prequel/reboot Bates Motel starring Vera Farmiga (Up in the Air) and Freddie Highmore (Finding Neverland) as Norma and Norman Bates, respectively. The show is a complete modern day re-imagining of the Psycho world, so fans should be prepared for a new vision of the Bates universe. EW talked to executive producers Carlton Cuse (Lost) and Kerry Ehrin (Friday Night Lights) about what’s in store for the first season. READ FULL STORY

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