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'Mad Men': Neve Campbell on her plane ride with Don Draper

In season 5 of Mad Men, Gilmore Girls‘s Alexis Bledel played a sad suburban housewife that Pete Campbell couldn’t resist. Last season, Don Draper had an affair with his neighbor’s wife, played by Freaks and Geeks star Linda Cardellini. So it made some sense that last night, during the season premiere of Mad Men, the mysterious beauty who shared a red-eye flight with Don was played by none other than Neve Campbell — also known as the star of Party of Five. If Don Draper doesn’t have a specific type, Matthew Weiner does. READ FULL STORY

'Mad Men' teaser: Time for a 'Breakdown'? -- VIDEO

Not everything about Mad Men is retro in the latest teaser for the first part of season 7. The clip shows the Mad crew slo-moing through an airport in an era where air-travel still represented a certain amount of luxury — but the accompanying song comes from British soul singer Alice Russell, who hadn’t even been born when Don and Roger were still ogling stewardesses flight attendants. The song, “Let Go (Breakdown),” is hardly a year old. (Will it irk Matthew Weiner that Russell’s tune was already co-opted by The Blacklist? Yes. Yes it will.)

Still, “Let Go” does capture a certain vibe that suits AMC’s drama, and its cryptic lyrics evoke possible themes as the show enters a crucial season of change: “I’m familiar Jenny / Missed them signs / I bare my positions / Flip over time.”

Watch it below, and make of it what you will. READ FULL STORY

'Mad Men' season 7 photo: Groovy at 30,000 feet -- EXCLUSIVE

Another day, another peek at season 7 of Mad Men. Like the first images we saw of Don Draper stepping off a plane, or the subsequent shots thoroughly analyzed by EW’s Darren Franich, this photo keeps with the aviation theme. It also indicates that as the ’60s are closing out, the gang is getting into the groovy, and they appear to be taking their show on the road. (To Los Angeles, home of their satellite office?)

Enough speculating. Behold Stan (Jay R. Ferguson) in his fringe jacket! Michael (Ben Feldman) in a bolo tie, which accessorizes nicely with his ‘stache! Peggy (Elisabeth Moss) giving us the white-glove treatment! Harry Crane (Rich Sommer) putting the ass in ascot! And Ken (Aaron Staton) with seemingly functional eyes and limbs! It’s all happening! READ FULL STORY

'Mad Men' season 7 teaser: Don Draper leaves us wanting more -- VIDEO

In typical Mad Men fashion, this just-released first-look teaser of the Madison Avenue drama’s upcoming seventh season is purposefully, extremely vague.

The clip — which lasts a mere 15 seconds — shows Don Draper (Jon Hamm), looking his usual dapper self in suit and hat, disembarking a TWA jet in slow-mo, while Wax Tailor’s jazzy version of “Que Sera” plays in the background.

Inevitably, we’re still left with questions. Where has Don landed? Where did he come from? Has he returned to Sterling Cooper & Partners after being ousted in the season finale? Where’s Megan?

We’ll have to speculate until Mad Men returns April 13 on AMC. READ FULL STORY

'New Girl': Linda Cardellini to guest as Jess' sister

Linda Cardellini is going to play a bad girl on New Girl. The Freaks and Geeks vet — who received an Emmy nomination for her role last season on Mad Men — has taken a recurring role as Abby, the out-of-control sister of Jess (Zooey Deschanel), Fox has confirmed. READ FULL STORY

SAG Award TV nominations: Snubs and surprises

During an awards season that’s dominated by talk of movies — all a gradual buildup to the biggest awards show of them all — it’s easy to forget that some winter prize distributors recognize TV shows as well. And once you remember that TV shows are also being lauded, your thoughts naturally turn to which nominations seem like a surprise, pleasant or otherwise — as well as the deserving series that have been overlooked.

And for today’s SAG Award nominations, each of these qualifies for one of those categories:

Snub: Mad Men
Matthew Weiner’s seminal series was passed over completely, even though it’s won two SAG ensemble awards before. What will it take to get Jon Hamm some individual recognition at an awards show? (After playing Don Draper for six seasons, he’s won a grand total of one TCA Award and one Golden Globe for the role, not counting the SAG Awards he shared with the show’s cast. That ain’t right.)
READ FULL STORY

'The Good Wife' and the problem of too much good TV

The moment I finally became a fan of The Good Wife occurred just about three weeks ago. It came in the current season’s widely praised fifth episode, “Hitting The Fan.” This was the one where Will (Josh Charles) and Diane (Christine Baranski) fired Alicia (Julianna Margulies) and Cary (Matt Czuchry) for plotting to start their own firm. As Will progressed from betrayal (his reaction, a symphonically-performed shock-face culminating in a downbeat “what?!”, was priceless) to “commando mode” (rallying emergency quorums; hustling clients to keep them from bolting), and as Alicia progressed from resolute yet regretful to full-on “Oh, it’s so on!” (countering Will’s counter-attacks; wooing Chum Hum; an adrenaline rush quickie with Governor Hubby), it was thrilling to watch them find new energy and purpose in their lives amid the crisis, if slightly heartbreaking to watch the former lovers, now former colleagues, become enemies. It was impossible to take a side; I wanted both to win. In a story full of such grand drama and significant developments, it was a smaller, funnier exchange between Alicia and Will that grabbed me. As a contentious phone conversation came to a close (“Go to hell!” “No, you go to hell!”), Will remembered something very important. “Oh, your daughter called,” he said, suddenly civil. “She needs you to call her school to let her go on a field trip.” “Oh. When was this?” Alicia asked, equally pleasant. “About 40 minutes ago.”  “Thank you.” “You’re welcome.” Click. And then war resumed.

Not a terribly ingenious scene, I grant you. It hewed to a familiar screwball comedic structure. The whiplash tonal shift; two rivals abruptly making nice or banal in a way that almost feels out of character. Except here, the moment felt true to the characters, at least as I understand them so far. It was an effective way to dramatize that their relationship was more complex than their current conflict, to show that neither of them should be defined by the crisis/concerns consuming them at present; and it was a moment that was representative of all of everything else in the show that was converting me to rabid Good Wife fandom. READ FULL STORY

Elisabeth Moss on her 'Simpsons' guest spot -- and the final season of 'Mad Men'

Before Elisabeth Moss returns to Manhattan, she’s making a pit stop in Springfield: The actress who stars as Peggy Olson on Mad Men is lending her voice to Sunday’s episode of The Simpsons (Fox, Nov. 17, 8 p.m.). Moss will play a pregnant woman named Gretchen whose baby Homer winds up delivering in an elevator. (Spoiler: It’s not Pete’s.) But when she names the baby Homer Jr. to recognize his good deed, Homer gets a little too attached to the little tyke. EW asked this unabashed Simpsons fan all about her big guest spot — and tossed in few Mad Men questions as well.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Is this your animated debut?
ELISABETH MOSS:
I have done a few things, but when I was really young. There was a Batman show. And I did a Hanna-Barbera film called Once Upon a Forest.

Was this something that you’d been hoping they’d ask you to do for awhile? How would you assess your level of Simpsons fandom?
I’m 31. It’s been on for 25 years. It’s been on for most of my life. It’s so a part of my world that I don’t remember a time when The Simpsons wasn’t on television. For my generation, it’s a huge part of our upbringing. It’s just a staple. [Being asked to guest-star] is not even something I would necessarily even dream of. Obviously that’s something you’d love to do but you think, “Oh, that’s really cool and important. Nobody’s ever going to ask you to do it.” I couldn’t have been more excited. You would have thought I had won an award or something. It really was such a honor, honestly, and it was one of those moments in your career, like being on Saturday Night Live and those things that aren’t technically a part of your day job that are such a stamp of approval, you know? It’s just one of those legendary things that I’ll be able to show to my kids. READ FULL STORY

Final season of 'Mad Men' to be split in half, air in 2014 and 2015

The final season of Mad Men will be expanded to 14 episodes, but you’ll only get half of it next year. AMC announced today that it will split the seventh season of the Madison Avenue-in-the-’60s drama into two parts, with the first half airing in spring 2014 and the second half debuting in spring 2015. READ FULL STORY

Linda Cardellini, 'Mad Men' superfan, talks secrets and her Emmy nod

Mad Men is a series that traffics in secrets, both onscreen (Don Draper’s increasingly less obscured past) and behind the scenes (creator Matt Weiner’s famous reluctance to reveal any information about what’s coming next). But though the show’s sixth season featured plenty of unanticipated shocks, its two biggest both involved one top-secret new character: Linda Cardellini’s Sylvia Rosen, a bored housewife who a) had an affair with Jon Hamm’s Don (gasp!) which led to b) Sally Draper (Kiernan Shipka) discovering her father cheating on his wife (double gasp!!).

It was an undeniably juicy guest role — which is why the Emmy Awards honored Cardellini with her very first nomination this morning. The actress, best known previously for her work on Freaks and Geeks, is understandably over the moon: “It feels amazing!” she gushed to EW today. “When I started the part, I didn’t know what it was I would be doing. And so having it unfold the way it did was amazing. And the idea that she is sort of a catalyst for all these things that happen in Don’s life — it became such a great role. So that happening, and now this on top of all that, it’s really a dream.”
READ FULL STORY

Elisabeth Moss marvels at her Emmy 'double down': 'It sounds so crazy!'

Emmy nominations are nothing new for Elisabeth Moss. She’s been racking up nods for her role on Mad Men every year since 2009, once in the Supporting Actress category and thrice in the Lead Actress category — so today’s fifth citation can’t have been much of a surprise.

She was, however, pleasantly shocked to discover that she’ll also be competing for Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie alongside heavy hitters Jessica Lange, Laura Linney, Helen Mirren, and Sigourney Weaver. No wonder she calls her competitors “ridiculously intimidating” — Moss, cited for her work in the BBC Two/UKTV/Sundance miniseries Top of the Lake, is the only nominee in the category who hasn’t also been nominated for multiple Oscars.

“It sounds so crazy to hear you say that!” she said with a laugh after EW congratulated her for getting two nominations. Moss’ mother apparently reacted to her news in much the same way: “I called my mom and woke her up, and she promptly responded that she was going to jump out a window,” she said, “which I thought was an appropriate response. I talked her down from the ledge.”
READ FULL STORY

Emmy Watch: Elisabeth Moss has blood on her hands in 'Top of the Lake'

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to submit nomination ballots, EW.com will feature interviews with some of the actors and actresses whose names we hope to hear when nominations are announced on July 18.

Increasingly there’s the sense that Elisabeth Moss can do anything. After six seasons of playing such a marvelous character like Peggy Olson on Mad Men, some actresses would have a hard time ever sliding out of such a comfortable wheelhouse. But this spring Moss, 30, reinvented herself in Jane Campion’s dark and moody miniseries masterpiece Top of the Lake.

As detective Robin Griffin, driven wild to solve the mystery of a missing pregnant 12-year-old girl, Moss was a churning ball of opposing forces. She was brittle (“You can be very hard,” Robin’s mother warned her at one point, “and what I don’t like is, you think it’s strength.”) and vulnerable and deeply wounded and weary and magnificently capable and a total mess. She was at once the youngest and oldest person in the room. She seemed always dangerous of both cracking open and throwing down, a tricky combination she nailed in a blistering scene in episode 4 when she attacks her childhood rapist in a bar. She is magnificent, boiling with feeling, and it’s pleasure to talk about a performance outside of her Mad Men‘s walls that’s worthy of Emmy consideration. READ FULL STORY

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