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Tag: Season Finale Awards (1-5 of 5)

Season Finale Awards: 'Big Bang Theory' EP talks show's serious win

Seven seasons in, The Big Bang Theory has scored its most-watched finale and its first award for being “not funny.” Or so joked exec producer Steve Molaro, who phoned Entertainment Weekly Radio to accept our reader-voted Season Finale Award for Best Serious Moment in a Comedy for the train station scene.

The goal of the finale, as Molaro puts it, was to “chip away at Sheldon and break him down to the point where he just needed to leave to process everything.” The university wouldn’t let him change his field of study. Newly-engaged Leonard wanted to talk about new living arrangements (as did Amy). And the comic book store burned down. Leonard and Penny found an overwhelmed Sheldon at the train station and decided they needed to let him go. With the writers not yet back to work, Molaro won’t say how much the experience will change Sheldon, only that it will affect him.

Watching Penny kiss Sheldon’s cheek goodbye got Molaro choked up. But the half hour also packed enough laughs for readers to vote it Funniest Finale. Molaro shares his favorite joke in the interview below. READ FULL STORY

Season Finale Awards: 'Arrow' stunt team vows to somehow do it even better

When Arrow star Stephen Amell teased the show’s second season finale to EW, he said, “If we can’t win the stunt Emmy for this episode, then the system is broken, for sure. I’m starting a campaign, because it’s movie s— that we do in this finale.” Well, it’s working. The show’s stunt coordination was voted Most Likely to Earn Someone an Emmy in our 5th Annual Season Finale Awards.

Stunt coordinator J.J. Makaro and fight coordinator James Bamford phoned in to Entertainment Weekly Radio to accept the honor and chat about the blowout tunnel battle and the dual showdown between Oliver and Slade. “Both fights actually became more of a practical, on-the-day kind of situation,” Makaro says. “We really, really strongly rehearsed the final fight where we had to figure out where the editing points were gonna be [between past and present], but [the tunnel] was more a logistical planning situation where we just put James in a room and he just sat there and he planned. He sat for hours staring at the tunnel [thinking] where he was gonna put his people, where the camera was gonna move.”

Makaro is quick to point out that his team succeeds because of the respect the show’s other departments have for what they do. He also says he and Bamford are used to hearing the question we asked them: How in the world do you top this?

“We have that question asked of us every episode,” Makaro says. “We’ve got the most incredible writers. They come up with terrific ideas, they use them to fuel our imaginations and leave us open to take that and make it even bigger. So they keep pushing the bar higher and higher and higher for us. And that’s the fun and thrill of doing the show…. ‘Try to top this, try to top this.’ Greg Berlanti, our producer, has a mantra that says, ‘Never leave anything behind.’ Don’t save anything for tomorrow. Give it your best, give it your all, and then figure out tomorrow how to do it better.”

Listen to the interview below (at one point we lose Bamford, who was kind enough to call from Italy). Then watch those epic fight scenes again. READ FULL STORY

Season Finale Awards: 'Once Upon a Time' creators on Regina's misfortune, casting Elsa, and that Hook-Emma hook-up

One of the big winners of EW.com’s fifth annual Season Finale Awards (voted on by readers like you!) was Once Upon a Time, ABC’s fantasy fairy tale which took home five awards* including Best Romantic Cliffhanger, Funniest Moment in a Drama, and Biggest Regret That I Didn’t See It, I Just Heard or Read About It.

To accept the awards, show creators Edward Kitsis and Adam Horowitz called in to Entertainment Weekly Radio on Sirius XM 105, where we quizzed them about all things season finale — including that steamy kiss between Hook and Emma, the misfortune of Regina, and what’s coming next in season four.

On Hook being jealous of Hook (Funniest Moment in a Drama): “I think all of us inside have jealousy and sometimes that even includes ourselves in past lives. For us, we kind of look at Captain Hook as our Han Solo. We say he’s Han Solo with guyliner.”

On the Robin-Regina-Marian triangle (Best Romantic Cliffhanger): “[Lana Parilla, who plays Regina] was like, ‘Oh, I’m really enjoying this, I’m falling in love,’ and we said, ‘Great, enjoy it, because we are going to destroy you.'”

On surprising fan love for Regina: “What’s amazing for us is that this is a woman who started the show trying to kill all the lead characters, and now everyone’s mad at us for ripping away her boyfriend.”

On whether Elsa, whose arrival was teased in the final moment of the finale, is more Frozen or fairy tale (Biggest Regret That I Didn’t See It…): “For us, I think this is Elsa from Frozen. That was kind of the inspiration… Will there be our own elements put to it? Yes. Like all things like we do with Snow White or Peter Pan or Captain Hook, we take our own kind of twist on it but remaining faithful to the actual essence of the character.”

Listen to the interview below: READ FULL STORY

Season Finale Awards: 'Revenge' EP talks winning cliffhanger, most disturbing image

Spoiler alert! That’s something we forgot to say to Revenge EP Sunil Nayar when he phoned in to Entertainment Weekly Radio today to accept his show’s Season Finale Award for Best Non-Romantic Cliffhanger and heard the list of nominees. Lucky for you, the clip below is all about his decision to have David Clarke be alive (and to stab Conrad Grayson), as well as the show’s second win in our fifth annual reader-voted awards, Most Disturbing Image. That, of course, would be Victoria’s “gift” to Emily — Aiden’s dead body sitting and waiting for her in front of the fireplace.

“To the credit of Barry [Sloane], who played the part, and to Ken Fink, who directed [the finale], and just the makeup department, it was so much more wonderfully creepy than I even thought it was gonna be,” Nayar says. “Even on the day we shot it, Barry just sitting there and the mouth kinda vaguely open, and how he managed to just stay committed to the moment while being dead was really remarkable. I love the image, and I thought Emily [VanCamp's] performance just seeing it was so tremendous. Her screams, and Victoria turning — it all turned out almost more wonderful and terrifying than we thought it could have been.”

The Revenge writers returned to work May 27, with David’s return and Emily’s reaction to Aiden’s death (she had Victoria, who’d figured out she’s Amanda Clarke, committed!), and more fun lies ahead. “One of the ideas was to reboot [the show], and one of the ideas was to really just kind of boot it in the ass, and I think we did both things really well,” Nayar says. READ FULL STORY

Season Finale Awards: 'Vampire Diaries' director takes us inside Damon's goodbye and that final shot

The winners of EW.com’s fifth annual reader-voted Season Finale Awards were announced today (see them here), and The Vampire Diaries earned five prizes: Most Rewound Moment, Most Unforgettable Line, and Best Use of Music for Damon’s goodbye to Elena; and Best (Presumed) Death or Exit and Best Final Shot for Damon’s mysterious disappearance with Bonnie.

Episode director Chris Grismer called into Entertainment Weekly Radio to accept Best Final Shot for that fade to white as the Other Side crumbled, and frenemies Damon (Ian Somerhalder) and Bonnie (Kat Graham) held hands to accept their unknown fate. In the end, he took a low-tech approach. “We just sort of over-exposed it, just old-school, and used smoke, and then I just had them grab the cameras and shake them,” he says, with a laugh. “The weird thing about it was the actors couldn’t hear each other because we had fans going and it was just pure chaos. So they kinda had to guess when it was their turn to talk, and then we dubbed their voices afterward.”

Damon’s emotional farewell to Elena (Nina Dobrev) had its own challenges. Somerhalder could look at Dobrev for his close-ups — but since Elena wasn’t supposed to be able to see dead Damon, Dobrev had to spend more time acting without Somerhalder in the frame. “To have her hair move [as though Damon was touching it], I had to have a green rod come in in the middle of the scene and move her hair, and she had to just keep in the moment, even though we were throwing all these curveballs at her,” Grismer says. “She did a great job.”

And for those wondering, he believes Somerhalder did improvise the “baby.”

Listen to the clip below. READ FULL STORY

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