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'Unfair' HBO knocked for 'True Detective' Emmy bid

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FX chief John Landgraf accused HBO, Showtime and Netflix of engaging in “unfair” Emmy submission practices by stretching the definitions of popular categories to score more award-season gold.

First Landgraf told reporters at his network’s upfront presentation to advertisers in New York on Wednesday that submitting True Detective as a drama was an “unfair” move, both because of the show’s stand-alone format and because networks are able to draw outsized A-list talent like Matthew McConaughey with the promise of single-season deals. “My own personal point of view is that a miniseries is a story that ends, a series is a story that continues,” Landgraf said. “To tell you the truth, I think it’s actually unfair for HBO to put True Detective in the drama series category because essentially you can get certain actors to do a closed-ended series — a la Billy Bob Thornton in Fargo or Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson in True Detective — who you can’t get to sign on for a seven-year [regular drama series] deal.”

The Wrap reported these initial comments, then Landgraf spoke to EW by phone to elaborate. The executive called the issue a “respectful debate” with his cable rivals. “It doesn’t make sense to put actors who signed on to do one year and perform the beginning, middle, and end of a character against those who are only showing one-fifth or one-sixth of that character’s journey in a season,” he said. “Matthew McConaughey is doing work every bit as good as [FX's Americans star] Matthew Rhys, but he’ll be competing against like one-sixth of the other actor’s performance. It doesn’t strike me as particularly fair. And I can see the entire series category eventually stacked with movie actors who signed on for one series of a show.” READ FULL STORY

Emmys: HBO's 'True Detective' will compete as a drama series

HBO’s critically acclaimed crime series True Detective will compete under the drama category, rather than miniseries, at this year’s Emmys, EW confirmed.

The eight-episode limited series, starring Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson, could have easily fit under the miniseries category, but will now be entering a more crowded contest, potentially competing against such hits as AMC’s Breaking Bad and Mad Men, Showtime’s Homeland, and HBO’s own Game of Thrones, among others.

The American Horror Story franchise made the opposite move in 2012 when it switched from drama to miniseries, which had positive results, garnering the series numerous nominations.

Earlier Tuesday, Showtime also made a shift announcing that its series Shameless would switch to the comedy  category after being submitted as a drama for the past three seasons.

'True Detective' deleted scene: Why Rust and Lori broke up -- VIDEO

True Detective fans certainly have no delusions that damaged philosopher Rust Cohle (Matthew McConaughey) was an easy man to live with; his repartee with partner Marty Hart (Woody Harrelson) was proof of that. But the only true glimpses viewers had of Rust’s brief attempt at a functioning relationship — with Hart family friend Lori (Elizabeth Reaser) — were in fragmented scenes that played like fading memories. (Spoilers ahead.)

Marty’s wife Maggie (Michelle Monaghan) introduced Rust to Lori after the detectives “solved” the grisly murder of Dora Lange. Beyond that, pretty much all we knew was that the relationship ended badly. But now that the season has ended, a new deleted scene sheds light on just how profoundly the death of Rust’s child impacted his ability to move forward in life. His inability to heal — or his desire not to — leads to one explosive, but not surprising, confrontation:

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HBO GO problems hit 'True Detective' finale

Have trouble watching the hotly anticipated True Detective finale tonight? You weren’t the only one. Fans of the series took to Twitter to protest technical issues that struck the HBO GO streaming platform. HBO GO’s official Twitter stream acknowledged the troubles, blaming the show’s literally overwhelming popularity: “Due to overwhelmingly popular demand for #TrueDetective, we’ve been made aware of an issue affecting some users. Please try again soon.” READ FULL STORY

'True Detective' ratings climb to best yet: Will HBO announce season 2?

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This is so not surprising to anybody who’s watching HBO’s True Detective: The freshman drama’s ratings have climbed to a series high.

Sunday’s episode of Detective had a best-yet 2.6 million viewers for its first airing at 9 p.m., up 13 percent from its previous high, which was the crime  anthology’s Jan. 13 season premiere. Across three plays for the night, Detective racked up 3.6 million, also a new best. During the season to date, Detective has an average audience of 10.9 million viewers across all HBO plays and platforms.

While dramas on broadcast network often launch to high ratings, given their big platform and heavy publicity, and then ebb steadily downward, dramas that debut on cable networks like HBO often launch to modest numbers and then slowly gain viewers. At least, that’s what the successful ones do. READ FULL STORY

'True Detective' post-mortem: Unraveling the mysteries

“Certain experiences you can’t survive, and afterward, you don’t fully exist, even if you failed to die. Everything that happened…is still happening, only now it’s 20 years later, and what happened is just story.”—from the novel Galveston by Nic Pizzolatto

“Strange is the night where black stars rise.” – from The King In Yellow by Robert W. Chambers

True Detective is many things at once—an immersive character study, a gripping head-trippy murder mystery, a psychological profile of the anti-hero zeitgeist, a tour de force for Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey. But simply and deeply, it is a story about two men telling a story. Rust Cohle (McConaughey) is a flickering ghost of a man who works four days a week and spends the other three drinking himself numb. Martin Hart (Harrelson) is a healthy-living P.I. whose good-old-boy humility, Bible Belt faith, and family man virtue belies so much hypocrisy. Both were detectives once—and for seven years, partners—and the tale they tell concerns a journey into some seriously noir woods, literally and metaphorically, that wrecked them and haunts them still. The more they talk, the more we see who they are, even as we wonder how much of what they’re saying is really true. READ FULL STORY

'True Detective' EP on anthology possibilities

The first season of HBO’s True Detective hasn’t premiered yet but executive producer Nic Pizzolatto already has a few ideas for what could come next for the anthology series.

“There could be a season that’s much more of a wide-spread conspiracy thriller, a season that’s a small town murder mystery, a season where nobody is murdered and it’s a master criminal versus a master detective,” Pizzolatto said. “Even the title True Detective is meant to be, of course, purposefully somewhat generic. There are deeper indications, the word true can also mean honorable….as long as there is some crime in there.”

It was not made clear if — like FX’s American Horror Story — the anthology would retain a few faces from season to season. For his part, Matthew McConaughey, who stars alongside Woody Harrelson, made clear that this season’s story was “contained,” but Pizzolatto was hesitant to agree with the actor when he claimed, “That’s it.” “We’ll talk later,” said Pizzolatto. READ FULL STORY

'True Detective' co-stars Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson on their dream buddy comedy

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Starting Sunday, Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey will join forces on the small screen in the highly anticipated new HBO series True Detective. The eight-episode show is pure gritty drama, a twisty tale about two mismatched cops — a family man with some hidden secrets (Harrelson) and a darkly pessimistic loner (McConaughey) — who are pursuing a mysterious serial killer in the Louisiana backwoods. But despite the grim subject matter, when EW interviewed McConaughey and Harrelson together for our Winter TV Preview issue (on stands now), the two — who’ve been friends for nearly 20 years — were all laughs, to the point that we had to ask: Why haven’t you guys ever made a buddy comedy together?

The idea has certainly come up before, McConaughey says. “People get around us for five minutes and they go, ‘We’ve got to get these two in something where they can play off each other.’ Because that’s what Woody and I do comedically very well.” Harrelson is just waiting for the right idea to come along. “I’d love to do a buddy comedy with Matthew — he’s about the funniest guy I know,” he says. “It’ll happen. But, you know, it’s just got to be something great. It can’t be something silly.”

If you ask McConaughey, though, all the two really need to get a buddy comedy going is someone to operate the camera and point them in a general direction, and they can take care of the rest: “We’ll handle all the dialogue,” he says. “All you’ve got to do is just tell us, ‘OK, here are your characters: There’s a secret bowling ball in a house in Malibu, and it may be David Geffen’s house, and he’s there having a bar mitzvah. Go!’ Don’t rehearse it. Don’t let Geffen and them know we’re going to be filming. Let us work our way past the guards. Just make sure you’ve got a large mag in the camera and record.”

A guerrilla-style Harrelson-McConaughey bowling-ball-heist comedy set during a bar mitzvah at David Geffen’s house — who wouldn’t want to see that movie? Get on it, Hollywood!

Get to know HBO's 'True Detectives,' a.k.a. Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey -- VIDEO

Who, exactly, are the men at the center of HBO’s upcoming crime drama True Detective? That’d be Rust Cohle (Matthew McConaughey) and Martin Hart (Woody Harrelson), a pair of vets with opposing personalities.

See, Marty was once a good man, according to his wife Maggie (Michelle Monaghan) — but his “f—ing job, it confused him and it tested him… brought out the worst in him,” she explains over footage of Harrelson slowly lowering a gun and drinking heavily. “Marty’s single big problem is that he never really knew himself,” she continues.

Rust, on the other hand, has the opposite problem: “Rust knew exactly who he was, and there was no talking him out of it. Rust was maybe the least confused person I’ve ever met,” she says, as we watch McConaughey violently confront someone in an interrogation room. So… bad cop/worse cop, then?

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Watch the new trailer for HBO mystery series 'True Detective' -- VIDEO

HBO released a new trailer for its mystery drama True Detective.  Starring Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson, the series centers around two detectives on a hunt to close a case involving a serial killer in Louisiana on the loose for over seventeen years.

Watch the trailer below: READ FULL STORY

New 'True Detective' trailer: Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey revisit the past -- VIDEO

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HBO has just released a gritty trailer for their upcoming serial narrative drama True Detective, which stars Woody Harrelson (The Hunger Games: Catching Fire) and Matthew McConaughey (Mud) as two detectives brought in to revisit a homicide case they worked on in 1995 involving a serial killer in Louisiana.

The show floats back and forth between their questioning of the crime in the present day and the events that happened while they were investigating the homicide in 1995.

The dark trailer showcases both detectives struggling with the effects of having investigated such a twisted homicide case for the course of 17 years.

Watch the new trailer below:
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The 'Girls' are back in town: HBO sets January premiere

Your next Girls fix is within reach, and it’s not on Saturday Night Live this time. HBO is debuting a new Sunday night lineup in January, including network favorite Girls and two new series.

True Detective, the hour-long drama starring Matthew McConaughey, Woody Harrelson, and Michelle Monaghan, is set to make its series debut Sunday, Jan. 12, at 9 p.m. ET/PT. Girls will return for its third season immediately following True Detective, with two back-to-back episodes premiering at 10 p.m ET/PT.

Following Girls, HBO announced the premiere of another new series a week later, Looking, debuting Sunday, Jan. 19 at 10:30 p.m. ET/PT. Looking follows three friends — Jonathan Groff, Frankie J. Alvarez, and Murray Bartlett — who “explore the fun and sometimes overwhelming options available to a new generation of gay men.”

Woody Harrelson, Matthew McConaughey are bad men in HBO 'True Detective' trailer -- VIDEO

Something deep and dark is afoot in the first trailer for True Detective, HBO’s upcoming mystery series starring Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey. The pair play detectives whose lives intersect on the hunt for a serial killer in Louisiana — a case that’s been open for 17 years.

In the trailer below, which premiered ahead of Sunday’s Boardwalk Empire season premiere, we see flashbacks to each of their past lives, loves, and early work on the investigation, which began in 1995. Towards the end, a more recent version of McConaughey’s character is revealed.

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