Inside TV Exclusive TV News and Scoop

Tag: True Detective (1-10 of 18)

Is 'True Detective' worthy? 'Modern Family,' again? The critics react to 2014's Emmy nods

Emmy-noms.jpg

MELISSA MAERZ: Jeff,

When the Emmy nominations were announced this morning, I was sitting at my desk, shouting, “Hodor! Hodor! Hodor!” Game of Thrones dominated with 19 nominations! Hot pie for everyone! I’d quibble with the fact that Noah Hawley’s fantastic update of Fargo didn’t get a best drama nod, especially since it was the runner-up with 18 nominations, and The Good Wife was unjustly ignored in that category, coming off its best season ever—it might be the only network drama that I truly loved—but the rest of the list was pretty solid. Among the smartest choices made in the best drama category: refusing to forget that Breaking Bad was and will always be one of the best TV shows of all time; leaving that mess of a Homeland season off that list (somewhere, Dana Brody is furrowing her brow); recognizing that House of Cards just keeps getting better and better as Frank Underwood gets worse and worse; and picking the right underdog, PBS, to fight in the battle against cable with Downton Abbey.

Here is my only real complaint, and I know I’m in the minority here: I was really, deeply disappointed by True Detective and don’t think it deserves a best drama nod. Don’t get me wrong: I was totally captivated by the first four episodes, and Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey both deserve their acting nods. Plus, the show deserves some kind of diamond-encrusted, deer-antler trophy for that spectacular six-minute tracking shot alone. But am I the only one who thought the story completely fell apart in the second half? The unreliable narrator device—which could’ve made for real suspense and second-guessing about who these two detectives really are and what their motives might be—ultimately  lead nowhere beyond one police cover-up. The central mystery was solved in a way that felt random. Too many Easter eggs ended up being MacGuffins. And I know people are really going to throw tomatoes at me here, but that final speech about the lying there and gazing up at the stars? So corny. Leave the cosmos-pondering to Neil deGrasse Tyson, guys.

What did you think of the drama nominations?

READ FULL STORY

Sarah Jessica Parker may star in a drama from the producers of 'True Detective'

Sarah Jessica Parker may be returning to the city—but this time, there could be less sex and more crime.

Sydney Kimmel Entertainment has acquired the rights to Wendy Ruderman and Barbara Laker’s non-fiction crime thriller Busted: A Tale of Corruption And Betrayal In The City of Brotherly Love, and Deadline reports that Sex and the City‘s Sarah Jessica Parker is expected to appear in one of the two main roles. SKE will produce the show with Anonymous Content, the producers of HBO’s True Detective.

Busted tells the story of two investigative journalists, Wendy Ruderman and Barbara Laker, whose investigative reporting helped bring to light one of the biggest police corruption scandals in Philadelphia’s history. Their reporting earned them a Pulitzer Prize.

“Wendy and Barbara have written an amazing true story, and we’re thrilled for it to be SKE’s first television project,” said SKE President of Production Carla Hacken and SKE President Jim Tauber in a statement. “Sarah Jessica Parker’s coming on board, along with David Frankel and Don Roos is simply a perfect combination that we couldn’t be happier about.”

David Frankel, the director of The Devil Wears Prada, is expected to direct and executive produce the pilot, and Don Roos, husband of Scandal‘s David Bucatinsky, will write it.

Since Sex and the City ended its groundbreaking run in 2004, Parker has guest-starred on FOX’s Glee and has appeared in several feature films. If picked up, this series would mark Parker’s first full-time return to television since the HBO comedy ended.

Before 'Crossbones,' 'CSI' was the only series John Malkovich considered -- LISTEN

John Malkovich has done TV movies and miniseries, but the May 30 premiere of NBC’s Crossbones marks his first role as a series regular. As Malkovich, who stars as the pirate Blackbeard in the drama from Luther creator Neil Cross, tells Entertainment Weekly Radio, he’d only ever been approached about starring in one other show: CSI, when William Peterson left the CBS procedural. “I had a conversation with Billy. I had a conversation with Gary Sinise, who’s also an old friend and does the other CSI. Sort of about what that was, what it meant, what the life was, etc.,” he says.

In the end, he couldn’t imagine losing his freedom to do other projects for nine months of the year. “I really had to think about it because I was doing two operas, I still direct plays all the time, doing other little films that interested me — I mean, that, okay, nobody saw and you don’t get paid for and blah, blah, blah, but that interested me. I didn’t know if I could see myself doing that. And both Billy and Gary thought they could not see me doing that, but go ahead if you want,” he adds with a laugh. READ FULL STORY

TCA nominations: 'True Detective' starts awards season fight

true-detective-02.jpg

The Television Critics Association announced its list of annual award nominees Tuesday, honoring repeat contenders like AMC’s Breaking Bad, HBO’s Game of Thrones and CBS’s The Good Wife.

Yet it’s the inclusion of HBO’s True Detective that’s the major headline-making presence here. Everybody expects the acclaimed, noir-soaked drama series to swamp awards season, and these nominations are the first indication the show could do just that. True Detective is nominated for outstanding actor (Matthew McConaughey), miniseries (though the show submitted in the drama category for the Emmys), outstanding new program, and the TCA Awards’ top category, Program of the Year (which Breaking Bad won last year). Basically, True Detective got nominated for every category for which it’s eligible.

Some other newcomers include Fox’s Cosmos for outstanding reality program, and other new program category noms: Fox’s Brooklyn Nine-Nine, FX’s Fargo, Netflix’s Orange Is the New Black and Fox’s Sleepy Hollow.

For the Heritage Award, which honors one long-standing program that has had a major cultural or social impact, the following classics are nominated: ABC’s Lost, NBC’s Saturday Night Live, Comedy Central’s South Park, NBC’s Star Trek and ABC’s Twin Peaks. That seems like a rather impossible choice to make. How do you compare SNL to Lost to 1966’s Star Trek?  Here’s the full list: READ FULL STORY

'True Detective' season 2 scoop: Trio of leads, California setting

True-Detective.jpg

Nic Pizzolatto is confirming some of the rumors about True Detective season 2 that have been quietly circulating in recent weeks. In an podcast with To the Best of Our Knowledge, the True Detective creator gave some scoop on the show, revealing that its second season — which still has not been officially announced — is probably going to have three leads. They’ll be all-new characters, “but I’m deeply in love with each of them,” he says. (We’re hearing, unconfirmed, the characters are two men and a woman.)

Pizzolatto also says the season will be set in California: “Not Los Angeles, but some of the much lesser-known venues of California. And we’re going to try to capture a certain psycho-sphere ambiance of the place, much like we did in season one.” (We’re hearing, unconfirmed, that it’s mainly set in the present day, and that Northern California plays a key role.) READ FULL STORY

'Unfair' HBO knocked for 'True Detective' Emmy bid

true-detective-matthew-mcconaughey.jpg

FX chief John Landgraf accused HBO, Showtime and Netflix of engaging in “unfair” Emmy submission practices by stretching the definitions of popular categories to score more award-season gold.

First Landgraf told reporters at his network’s upfront presentation to advertisers in New York on Wednesday that submitting True Detective as a drama was an “unfair” move, both because of the show’s stand-alone format and because networks are able to draw outsized A-list talent like Matthew McConaughey with the promise of single-season deals. “My own personal point of view is that a miniseries is a story that ends, a series is a story that continues,” Landgraf said. “To tell you the truth, I think it’s actually unfair for HBO to put True Detective in the drama series category because essentially you can get certain actors to do a closed-ended series — a la Billy Bob Thornton in Fargo or Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson in True Detective — who you can’t get to sign on for a seven-year [regular drama series] deal.”

The Wrap reported these initial comments, then Landgraf spoke to EW by phone to elaborate. The executive called the issue a “respectful debate” with his cable rivals. “It doesn’t make sense to put actors who signed on to do one year and perform the beginning, middle, and end of a character against those who are only showing one-fifth or one-sixth of that character’s journey in a season,” he said. “Matthew McConaughey is doing work every bit as good as [FX's Americans star] Matthew Rhys, but he’ll be competing against like one-sixth of the other actor’s performance. It doesn’t strike me as particularly fair. And I can see the entire series category eventually stacked with movie actors who signed on for one series of a show.” READ FULL STORY

Emmys: HBO's 'True Detective' will compete as a drama series

HBO’s critically acclaimed crime series True Detective will compete under the drama category, rather than miniseries, at this year’s Emmys, EW confirmed.

The eight-episode limited series, starring Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson, could have easily fit under the miniseries category, but will now be entering a more crowded contest, potentially competing against such hits as AMC’s Breaking Bad and Mad Men, Showtime’s Homeland, and HBO’s own Game of Thrones, among others.

The American Horror Story franchise made the opposite move in 2012 when it switched from drama to miniseries, which had positive results, garnering the series numerous nominations.

Earlier Tuesday, Showtime also made a shift announcing that its series Shameless would switch to the comedy  category after being submitted as a drama for the past three seasons.

'True Detective' deleted scene: Why Rust and Lori broke up -- VIDEO

True Detective fans certainly have no delusions that damaged philosopher Rust Cohle (Matthew McConaughey) was an easy man to live with; his repartee with partner Marty Hart (Woody Harrelson) was proof of that. But the only true glimpses viewers had of Rust’s brief attempt at a functioning relationship — with Hart family friend Lori (Elizabeth Reaser) — were in fragmented scenes that played like fading memories. (Spoilers ahead.)

Marty’s wife Maggie (Michelle Monaghan) introduced Rust to Lori after the detectives “solved” the grisly murder of Dora Lange. Beyond that, pretty much all we knew was that the relationship ended badly. But now that the season has ended, a new deleted scene sheds light on just how profoundly the death of Rust’s child impacted his ability to move forward in life. His inability to heal — or his desire not to — leads to one explosive, but not surprising, confrontation:

READ FULL STORY

HBO GO problems hit 'True Detective' finale

Have trouble watching the hotly anticipated True Detective finale tonight? You weren’t the only one. Fans of the series took to Twitter to protest technical issues that struck the HBO GO streaming platform. HBO GO’s official Twitter stream acknowledged the troubles, blaming the show’s literally overwhelming popularity: “Due to overwhelmingly popular demand for #TrueDetective, we’ve been made aware of an issue affecting some users. Please try again soon.” READ FULL STORY

'True Detective' ratings climb to best yet: Will HBO announce season 2?

True-Detective.jpg

This is so not surprising to anybody who’s watching HBO’s True Detective: The freshman drama’s ratings have climbed to a series high.

Sunday’s episode of Detective had a best-yet 2.6 million viewers for its first airing at 9 p.m., up 13 percent from its previous high, which was the crime  anthology’s Jan. 13 season premiere. Across three plays for the night, Detective racked up 3.6 million, also a new best. During the season to date, Detective has an average audience of 10.9 million viewers across all HBO plays and platforms.

While dramas on broadcast network often launch to high ratings, given their big platform and heavy publicity, and then ebb steadily downward, dramas that debut on cable networks like HBO often launch to modest numbers and then slowly gain viewers. At least, that’s what the successful ones do. READ FULL STORY

'True Detective' post-mortem: Unraveling the mysteries

“Certain experiences you can’t survive, and afterward, you don’t fully exist, even if you failed to die. Everything that happened…is still happening, only now it’s 20 years later, and what happened is just story.”—from the novel Galveston by Nic Pizzolatto

“Strange is the night where black stars rise.” – from The King In Yellow by Robert W. Chambers

True Detective is many things at once—an immersive character study, a gripping head-trippy murder mystery, a psychological profile of the anti-hero zeitgeist, a tour de force for Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey. But simply and deeply, it is a story about two men telling a story. Rust Cohle (McConaughey) is a flickering ghost of a man who works four days a week and spends the other three drinking himself numb. Martin Hart (Harrelson) is a healthy-living P.I. whose good-old-boy humility, Bible Belt faith, and family man virtue belies so much hypocrisy. Both were detectives once—and for seven years, partners—and the tale they tell concerns a journey into some seriously noir woods, literally and metaphorically, that wrecked them and haunts them still. The more they talk, the more we see who they are, even as we wonder how much of what they’re saying is really true. READ FULL STORY

'True Detective' EP on anthology possibilities

The first season of HBO’s True Detective hasn’t premiered yet but executive producer Nic Pizzolatto already has a few ideas for what could come next for the anthology series.

“There could be a season that’s much more of a wide-spread conspiracy thriller, a season that’s a small town murder mystery, a season where nobody is murdered and it’s a master criminal versus a master detective,” Pizzolatto said. “Even the title True Detective is meant to be, of course, purposefully somewhat generic. There are deeper indications, the word true can also mean honorable….as long as there is some crime in there.”

It was not made clear if — like FX’s American Horror Story — the anthology would retain a few faces from season to season. For his part, Matthew McConaughey, who stars alongside Woody Harrelson, made clear that this season’s story was “contained,” but Pizzolatto was hesitant to agree with the actor when he claimed, “That’s it.” “We’ll talk later,” said Pizzolatto. READ FULL STORY

'True Detective' co-stars Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson on their dream buddy comedy

True-Detective-tralier.jpg

Starting Sunday, Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey will join forces on the small screen in the highly anticipated new HBO series True Detective. The eight-episode show is pure gritty drama, a twisty tale about two mismatched cops — a family man with some hidden secrets (Harrelson) and a darkly pessimistic loner (McConaughey) — who are pursuing a mysterious serial killer in the Louisiana backwoods. But despite the grim subject matter, when EW interviewed McConaughey and Harrelson together for our Winter TV Preview issue (on stands now), the two — who’ve been friends for nearly 20 years — were all laughs, to the point that we had to ask: Why haven’t you guys ever made a buddy comedy together?

The idea has certainly come up before, McConaughey says. “People get around us for five minutes and they go, ‘We’ve got to get these two in something where they can play off each other.’ Because that’s what Woody and I do comedically very well.” Harrelson is just waiting for the right idea to come along. “I’d love to do a buddy comedy with Matthew — he’s about the funniest guy I know,” he says. “It’ll happen. But, you know, it’s just got to be something great. It can’t be something silly.”

If you ask McConaughey, though, all the two really need to get a buddy comedy going is someone to operate the camera and point them in a general direction, and they can take care of the rest: “We’ll handle all the dialogue,” he says. “All you’ve got to do is just tell us, ‘OK, here are your characters: There’s a secret bowling ball in a house in Malibu, and it may be David Geffen’s house, and he’s there having a bar mitzvah. Go!’ Don’t rehearse it. Don’t let Geffen and them know we’re going to be filming. Let us work our way past the guards. Just make sure you’ve got a large mag in the camera and record.”

A guerrilla-style Harrelson-McConaughey bowling-ball-heist comedy set during a bar mitzvah at David Geffen’s house — who wouldn’t want to see that movie? Get on it, Hollywood!

Advertisement

Latest Videos in TV

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP