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Tag: TV Pilots (27-39 of 249)

NBC nabs CIA drama starring Katherine Heigl

NBC has ordered a pilot that will star Katherine Heigl as a CIA analyst who communicates directly with the president about world crises.

The project has been described as a procedural by Alexi Hawley (The Following). Heigl has been working on it with feature producer Robert Simonds (This Means War) and a team of senior CIA suits. It generated quick interest at both the broadcast and cable nets.

The project — if it goes the distance — should not see the light of day until fall 2014.

NBC will pay a significant penalty if the pilot doesn’t air, which means the project has a good chance at a pickup — and Heigl will get her TV comeback.

'Walking Dead's' governor cast in new AMC project

David Morrissey — aka the Governor on The Walking Dead — has been cast in a new drama pilot for AMC, which may fuel speculation that his character will finally meet his maker in season four.

But don’t despair, Dead-heads: The cable network insists that Morrissey will do double duty on the zombie drama and Line of Sight, which will focus on a National Transportation Safety Board investigator (Morrissey) who survives a mysterious plane crash. AMC told Deadline that both  are produced in Atlanta, which will make it possible for the actor to work two jobs. Line Of Sight is from Blake Masters (2 Guns) and director Jonathan Demme.

Morrissey appeared alongside other cast members at Dead’s Comic-Con panel last month in San Diego. His character wasn’t featured in the trailer, though. Hmm…

The fourth season of The Walking Dead begins on Oct. 13.

Michael J. Fox: Parkinson's is frustrating and funny

There’s nothing horrifying about having Parkinson’s, insists Michael J. Fox — no “gothic nastiness” to his affliction that is the basis for many jokes in his new eponymous sitcom debuting this fall on NBC.

“A lot of times when you have a disability, the one thing you deal with is rejection of your experience, or fear they have about it,” Fox told reporters Saturday at the Television Critics Tour. ” They’re not seeing the experience you are having. But there’s nothing horrifying about it. There is no gothic nastiness. The reality of Parkinson’s is that sometimes it’s frustrating and sometimes it’s funny,” he continued. “I need to look at that way.”

Fox said that he and Executive Producers Will Gluck and Sam Laybourne mined the actor’s life for comedy gold. (The series focuses on a former news anchor with Parkinson’s who returns to work — much to the happiness of his family). Most of the jokes that are told in the pilot episode — like how Fox’s character takes too long to serve food, which prompts his wife (Betsy Brandt)  to criticize his need for a “personal victory” — came from Fox’s personal experiences.

“We sat down and I said here’s the kind of stuff I deal with on daily basis,” said Fox, who also invited his real life wife Tracy Pollan to appear in the series’ third episode.

“We’re honoring” Mike’s family, added Gluck, who described Fox’s home life as “wildly funnier.”

The producers also teased how they’ll use Anne Heche, the newest cast member. “She’s the newest nemesis for Mike,” Laybourne said. “Let’s just say there was a disputed incident 20 years ago in the Everglades and she used Mike to help her career. As an anchor, they’ll butt heads.”

Here’s the trailer for The Michael J. Fox Show, which will debut at 9 p.m. on Sept. 26 for a one-hour launch, and then shifts into its regular 9:30 p.m. slot. READ FULL STORY

'Beverly Hills Cop' TV series fails to find a home -- but it might be a movie instead

The Beverly Hills Cop TV spin-off planned for CBS seemed to be a foregone conclusion, with a star in place (Brandon T. Jackson), a TV vet as the new police chief (Christine Lahti), and even the promise of occasional visits from original star Eddie Murphy as Detective Axel Foley. But in May, it was announced that CBS had passed on the hour-long drama, leaving the pilot’s future up in the air.

Showrunner Shawn Ryan had hoped another network would save the show, but he tweeted Friday that they couldn’t find a new home. All hope is not lost, however: Ryan also revealed that there there’s now interest in a movie sequel instead.

Read what Ryan had to say below:
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Liv Tyler joins Damon Lindelof's 'The Leftovers' pilot

Liv Tyler has joined the cast of The Leftovers, Damon Lindelof’s HBO pilot based on Tom Perrotta’s book of the same name. The Lord of the Rings actress will star alongside Justin Theroux, EW has confirmed.

In the post-apocalyptic story, Tyler plays Meg, who is recruited to join a cult following the Rapture, while Theroux is Kevin, a chief of police.
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'Ray Donovan' pilot: Watch it online here

If the boss isn’t looking, you can sit at your desk and watch the entire first episode of Showtime’s upcoming drama series Ray Donovan right here. Liev Schreiber stars as a guy who makes the problems of L.A.’s elite disappear, while Jon Voight plays his devious recently paroled father (Voight introduces the video below and says Showtime’s “Brace Yourself” slogan with just slightly more enthusiasm than if he was at gunpoint). Also: This online version is edited for content, so expect blurred boobies. Ray Donovan premieres after the final season debut of Dexter on June 30:
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John Hurt joins Guillermo del Toro's 'The Strain' pilot

John Hurt has joined the cast of The Strain, the upcoming FX pilot based on the vampire novel trilogy by Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan. The 73-year-old British actor, who previously worked with del Toro on 2004′s Hellboy, will play holocaust survivor and professor Abraham Setrakian.

“I am incredibly happy to be reunited with John, who is one of the greatest actors in the world and one of my favorite people ever,” del Toro, who is set to direct and co-write the pilot, said in a statement. “Chuck and I always visualized him while writing The Strain novels and he is absolutely perfect for the part!”
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Amazon picks up 'Alpha House' with John Goodman, 'Betas,' 3 children's shows

It’s all Greek to Amazon — at least when it comes to the retail site’s first original series for adults.

The company announced today that it has chosen five of the 14 pilots it posted online in April to become full-blown series: Alpha House, a political comedy created by Doonesbury‘s Garry Trudeau that stars John Goodman (and features a cameo by Bill Murray); Betas, a Silicon Valley-set comedy starring Ed Begley Jr.; and Annebots, Creative Galaxy, and Tumbleaf, three series aimed at kids.

Each show proved popular with Amazon customers, whose feedback was taken into account during the selection process. Amazon says that full series of all five will air exclusively on Prime Instant Video late this year and in early 2014, though no specific premiere dates have been set yet. READ FULL STORY

FX developing comedy with Billy Crystal

FX has greenlit a single-camera pilot called The Comedians that will star Billy Crystal as a veteran joke teller who is paired with a younger and edgier performer for a late-night sketch show.

The pilot, which will begin shooting this summer, is based on a Swedish format of the same name from Stockholm-based Efti AB. Larry Charles (Seinfeld) will direct and executive produce the pilot. Other EPS are Matt Nix (Burn Notice), Ben Wexler (Community, Arrested Development) and Crystal.

“It truly is an honor to be in business with Billy Crystal and Larry Charles, two of the all-time greats in comedy,” said FX Topper John Landgraf in a statement. “We have also wanted for some time to be in business with Matt Nix, who has done such an amazing job creating and running Burn Notice.  They, along with Ben Wexler, are an unbeatable team and we’re incredibly excited about this project.”

'Zombieland' pilot dead at Amazon, fans 'hated it out of existence'

It’s a sad day in Zombieland-land: Franchise creator Rhett Reese — who co-wrote both the 2009 movie and the Amazon pilot that that movie has become with Paul Wernick — tweeted that the series “will not be moving forward on Amazon. Sad for everyone involved.”

The pilot has been available online for a month. Our Chris Nashawaty said, “There are a few yuks and also a pleasantly high body count. [But] the actors feel like bargain-basement knockoffs of Harrelson, et al. … You feel like you’re watching a smudged Xerox of what was a pretty hilarious movie.”

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The CW's Fall Schedule: A Snap Judgment

the-originals-02.jpg

You know the space at your local Barnes and Noble where the graphic-novel section bleeds into the young-adult section? This is the place where The CW lives. I like to imagine that the network has installed surveillance cameras in the spines of all those unsellable copies of Chris Ware’s Building Stories so its execs can spy on their target audience, see what their buying, and develop accordingly. The geeky, young, female-skewing weblet announced today that it will add three new dramas and reorganize its schedule to use existing successful franchises like Arrow and Supernatural to build hits and stronger nights.

The CW knows its brand and knows its audience and is committed to giving them more of what they like. Hence, despite lots of attitude, fresh faces, and cosmetic weirdness, The CW’s picks feel as risk-averse and unsurprising as those of its half-sibling, CBS. While the new shows technically belong to different genres, there is such a sameness to all of them. It’s like every show on The CW is actually a different subplot of the same swoony-romantic dark-fantasy soap opera that’s on every night, every hour — a sigh-fi Cloud Atlas. Which sounds kinda cool, actually.

THE ORIGINALS

A spin-off of The Vampire Diaries, The Originals follows bloodsucker/werewolf hybrid Klaus (Joseph Morgan) as he moves from Mystic Falls to New Orleans, where underworld power games — and a not-yet born child, conceived with Hayley (Phoebe Tonkin) — await. Joining him are siblings Elijah (Claire Gillies) and Rebekah (Claire Holt). For the record, I have never seen an episode of True Blood Lite The Vampire Diaries. I am open to considering the possibility that I’ve been missing out on something decent: Morgan’s Klaus seems pretty damn compelling in this clip.

THE TOMORROW PEOPLE

From Greg Berlanti, who developed Arrow for the network, comes another superheroish epic starring an Amell (Robbie, cousin to Stephen), this one loosely based on a cult-classic British show from the 1970s. (Dig the trippy credits sequence.) The more likely comparison for The CW’s target audience will be to X-Men, Heroes, I Am Number Four, etc.: Kids everywhere start developing extraordinary abilities; various secret agencies, sinister or otherwise, take an obsessive interest in them. I am hoping the show can be as cool as its title and offbeat/imaginative as the original from whence it derived, and not just Generic Show About Super-Powered PYTs. The clip suggests a healthy special-effects budget and that Mark Pellegrino will be a compelling bad guy. I’m not sure it suggests much more than that.

 REIGN

Talented up-and-comer Adelaide Kane plays Mary, Queen of Scots in The CW’s most unusual new offering, an attempt at historical fiction. Call it: Tiny Tudors. The clip kinda lays there until the dude with the beard gets all spooky-intense. Meh.

THE 100 (midseason)

Newsflash! In the near future, we’re going to raze civilization with nuclear weapons, and about 100 years after that, the surviving members of humanity — living on space stations parked in deep space — will send about 100 juvenile delinquents, young adults and assorted others back to Earth to see it can be recolonized. The clip tries to capture your imagination with that moment in which the kids land, open the doors, and behold a planet that has been reclaimed by nature. But can they trust what looks like paradise? Dunno. Just like I don’t know if I can trust this new gloss on the post-apocalyptic genre to be any good.

STAR-CROSSED (midseason)

An alien race known as the Atrians comes to Earth and spends the next decade interned in a camp. A smalltown high school becomes ground zero for a fraught attempt to integrate the ETs into human society. All of them are extremely attractive young people with interesting looking tattoos on their faces. Naturally, they are irrationally, ridiculously hated. But a Romeo and Juliet-style romance between an Atrian named Roman (Matt Lanter) and a human named Emery (Aimee Teegarden) blooms. Blah blah highly metaphorical cornball blah blah blah. Watch it work. Only on Sigh-Fi!

Twitter: @EWDocJensen

Read more:
CBS fall schedule: Snap Judgment
CW’s ‘Wonder Woman’ prequel lives

CBS' Fall Schedule: A Snap Judgment

Who says CBS doesn’t make bold programming moves? Oh, that’s right: Everyone. But everyone would be slightly wrong! At yesterday’s upfront presentation, the nation’s most-watched — if least-interesting — broadcast television network surprised reporters by revealing that it was not green-lighting two high-profile potential series: A small screen revival of Beverly Hills Cop from executive producer Shawn Ryan (The Shield) starring Brandon T. Jackson as the son of Axel Foley and a recurring Eddie Murphy; and NCIS: Red, starring John Corbett and Kim Raver. Beverly Hills Cop might find a home elsewhere, while NCIS: Red was deemed unworthy of the franchise’s creative standards. (Why are you giggling?)

CBS also made news with some bold scheduling swaps and shifts. Mike & Molly is being held for midseason (but received a full order of 22 episodes); Hawaii 5-0 is sailing to Friday; and Person of Interest is relocating to Tuesday, joining NCIS and NCIS: Los Angeles to form a blockbuster night of brawny drama. Thursday now has two hours of comedy, a mirror to its Monday night block of powerhouse yukkers. With few holes to fill and (quoting network president Nina Tassler) “limited shelf space,” CBS ordered just eight new shows, five of which will premiere this fall. Here, CBS was true to form: All have potential to be watched by a broad audience, and very few seem all that creatively daring. To be fair, it’s hard to glean meaningful insight from the preview videos released by the network, comprised of select scenes, behind the scenes footage, and rah-rah interviews with actors and producers. And while CBS may not have leveraged its position of great strength to take a chance on innovation, I found something commendable about each of its new offerings. READ FULL STORY

NBC orders 'Ironside' reboot

Blair Underwood is returning to NBC to help revive a classic TV show.

NBC has ordered to series a remake of Ironside, the ’60s drama that starred Raymond Burr as a wheelchair-bound detective.

Underwood will play the title role in the new version from Michael Caleo, David Semel, Teri Weinberg, John Davis and Jon Fox. Here’s the network description: “A tough, sexy but acerbic police detective relegated to a wheelchair after a shooting is hardly limited by his disability as he pushes and prods his hand-picked team to solve the most difficult cases in the city.”

The original series, which is owned by the Peacock’s parent company, ran on NBC from 1967 to 1975.

In 2010, Underwood played the president in NBC’s shortlived actioner The Event.

NBC will announce its complete fall schedule to advertisers on Monday in New York.

More:

Fall TV pilots 2013 series orders
‘Whitney,’ ‘Up All Night,’ more cancelled by NBC
‘Parks and Recreation’ renewed

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